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Hunters Ethics


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#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 09:06 AM

I have heard many stories of Hunters that were less than flattering so thought I would share one completely different. 

My son Bailey is a very active hunter, fisheman and trapper. He won awards from the North American Trappers Association lat year for the #1 Badger and #1 Muskrat pelts from the central region..

 

Due to the heavy rain Saturday and Sunday Morning he was not able to drive into a section he traps, So had to walk in.

He said he was about a mile into a  Double section( Sections are 1 square mile) he traps.

He said he found the largest coon he has seen in several years about 40lbs+.

Bailey uses dog safe traps, and they could be hard to see if one were hunting at night.

 

It had been shot, and had a can of Budwiser wired to one paw and a tin of coppenhagen wired to the other and a note that read

" Sorry Dude I shot your coon. I did not realize he was in your trap"  Signed a Fellow Coon Hunter.


Edited by JD DANNELS, November 18, 2013 - 09:10 AM.

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#2 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 10:22 AM

HMMMMM...... Not quite sure to make from this. I can see leaving a note saying he was sorry but using the beer can and chew can! I've walked in the woods and came across animals in a trap. Alive and dead. I would no more think about shooting the live animals as I would at taking the dead ones from the trap. Trapping is a honest, ethical, fun and physically demanding, and here is where I will get some dissention from some,( sport and profession). My Uncle was a trapper in the 40s and 50s and that is how he made his living for him and my aunt. I still have a trap that he used which is unique in itself. I also had a friend who has passed now that was atrapper after a very succesul teaching career. Niether of these gentlemen would of thought of trying to steal or harm or deface anothers catch or kill.  

Congratulations to Bailey for his love of the sport and time and effort to keep it going in America today. Congratulations to him for winning the awards and tell him to keep it up and if there is someone around who wants to learn trapping , he sounds like he would be a good mentor for them.    Roger.


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#3 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 11:55 AM

HMMMMM...... Not quite sure to make from this. I can see leaving a note saying he was sorry but using the beer can and chew can! I've walked in the woods and came across animals in a trap. Alive and dead. I would no more think about shooting the live animals as I would at taking the dead ones from the trap. Trapping is a honest, ethical, fun and physically demanding, and here is where I will get some dissention from some,( sport and profession). My Uncle was a trapper in the 40s and 50s and that is how he made his living for him and my aunt. I still have a trap that he used which is unique in itself. I also had a friend who has passed now that was atrapper after a very succesul teaching career. Niether of these gentlemen would of thought of trying to steal or harm or deface anothers catch or kill.  

Congratulations to Bailey for his love of the sport and time and effort to keep it going in America today. Congratulations to him for winning the awards and tell him to keep it up and if there is someone around who wants to learn trapping , he sounds like he would be a good mentor for them.    Roger.

Roger I think a full can of beer and a tin of chew was his idea of a peace offering?

As for mentoring, that's in the works too.  Chad, the guy who runs the archery shop Bailey goes to has started making the dog safe traps and Bailey is mentoring him in trapping skills, since this is his first year trapping.


Edited by JD DANNELS, November 18, 2013 - 11:59 AM.

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#4 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 12:07 PM

That is what I was hoping but just wasn't sure. Glad to Bailey helping someone out and getting into the sport. Roger.



#5 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 03:44 PM

At least he left something!

 

I'd take his peace offering. 

 

My grandfather was big into trapping when I was a kid.  He would trap, and sell the pelts for a decent amount of money.  He used to bring home a lot of fox.  Seemed that way to me when I was a kid.  A guy up the road would pay a decent price for a fox pelt.


Edited by toomanytoys84, November 18, 2013 - 03:45 PM.

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#6 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 04:06 PM

At least it was still there and the hunter felt bad enough to leave a note and peace offering. I have heard of traps being emptied and nothing left. That just leaves a bad taste for the sport.


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#7 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 06:10 PM

What does a muskrat have to do to be the #1 pelt???  There are an awful lot of muskrats and they all look alike to me.


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#8 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 06:16 PM

What does a muskrat have to do to be the #1 pelt???  There are an awful lot of muskrats and they all look alike to me.

 

I doubt if muskrats will read this with pleasure.  That's like suggesting to a cow what to eat to make the steaks more tender.

 

Ben W.


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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 06:29 PM

What does a muskrat have to do to be the #1 pelt??? There are an awful lot of muskrats and they all look alike to me.

The award read that a panel of international buyers and judges selected the pelt as the best Muskrat pelt offered for sale at auction from the central region of North America. And as you say since muskrat are very common and are probably the most caught furbearer it would have to be outstanding in size, prime, stretched and cured very well to have buyers and judges take notice.
Like you I would not know one from another, but for those who make their living in the business to recognize one as outstanding seems quite a feat.

Edited by JD DANNELS, November 18, 2013 - 06:42 PM.

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#10 gopher OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 06:48 PM

Lets say it's a good out door activity for using mind skills and plenty of exorcise Just one thing do you really want your son in the woods with someone with a gun and evidently alcohol not very good mix. 


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#11 bolex OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 07:08 PM

i've seen worse peace offerings :thumbs:



#12 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2013 - 07:41 PM

Lets say it's a good out door activity for using mind skills and plenty of exorcise Just one thing do you really want your son in the woods with someone with a gun and evidently alcohol not very good mix.

There is always going to be risk in whatever a body does in life. Bailey is 35, about 5 ft 10, and weighs 260 lbs and has preferred heavy manual labor through his adult life He has been an outdoorsman all his life and can take care of himself.
I think he is safer than I probably am driving to the city to work everyday.

Edited by JD DANNELS, November 18, 2013 - 08:01 PM.

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#13 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2013 - 01:25 AM

I started trapping when I was ten, and leg hold traps and snares were what we used. If you came across a trap with something still alive in it you just killed it and left it for the other trapper as a matter of course--- nobody wanted to see a creature suffer or perhaps chew a leg off and get away. Now, with the Connibear traps and others like them, you just don't find live animals in them. Leghold traps are illegal here now, but you can use snares. The last fur block we trapped was 25 square miles of provincial bush, with  bear, wolves, coyotes, fox, fisher, martin, mink, squirrel, lynx, cougar, weasel, beaver, muskrat, otter, wolverine, badger, and racoon. Since I can't get around any more I sure miss being out in the bush, but I don't miss killing the creatures, it was a way of making ends meet when times were tough.


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#14 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2013 - 05:24 AM

Drinking and chewing is probably why the coon ended up in the trap!


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#15 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2013 - 05:12 PM

I started trapping when I was ten, and leg hold traps and snares were what we used. If you came across a trap with something still alive in it you just killed it and left it for the other trapper as a matter of course--- nobody wanted to see a creature suffer or perhaps chew a leg off and get away. Now, with the Connibear traps and others like them, you just don't find live animals in them. Leghold traps are illegal here now, but you can use snares. The last fur block we trapped was 25 square miles of provincial bush, with  bear, wolves, coyotes, fox, fisher, martin, mink, squirrel, lynx, cougar, weasel, beaver, muskrat, otter, wolverine, badger, and racoon. Since I can't get around any more I sure miss being out in the bush, but I don't miss killing the creatures, it was a way of making ends meet when times were tough.

You live in some mighty big country and a trapline of 25 square miles could take 2-3 days to cover, so it makes sense to make a clean kill to prevent loss to a fellow trapper. Iowa is laid out in a tradition Pennsylvania Dutch manner, with gravel or paved roads on all 4 sides of a section. Of course there are exceptions due to geographic obstacles and in recent years with the expansion of corporate farms(sometimes several generations of the original settlers family) So most trappers around here runn their traplines by car or truck and are rarely over a mile from the road. Iowa still allows leg hold traps but they are normally used for drowning sets.
Iowa also requires the traps be checked every 24 hours. Bailey normally runs less sets and works them in the morning before work and in the evening.






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