Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Renovation Of A 105 Yr. Old House


  • Please log in to reply
36 replies to this topic

#16 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

toomanytoys84

    Aaron

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 45129
  • 8,239 Thanks
  • 5,077 posts
  • Location: Ohio

Posted November 18, 2013 - 02:41 PM

Old houses can be a major challenge to work on.  My last hour turned 115 this year.

 

The house I have now turned 90 this year.  My Dads just turned 100 this year.

 

I have found old houses are built much more stoutly.  My aunt has a newer home, so does my mother-in-law.  Both built in the same development.  10 year old houses, cracked drywall, sagging, squeaky floors, and all kinds of problems.  They are both in sad shape.

 

Good luck with your project.  Keep us posted.  I enjoy watching other people work on their homes.  Gives me ideas for mine!


  • Sawdust and MyBolens1053 have said thanks

#17 Sawdust OFFLINE  

Sawdust
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 36549
  • 4,521 Thanks
  • 2,829 posts
  • Location: Butler, Kentucky

Posted November 18, 2013 - 07:21 PM

Your doing fantastic work. I've been in the construction business a long time. I started out framing new homes to interior trim. About twenty five years ago I decided I enjoy remodeling the best. Your home looks well built. Don't get overwhelmed, prioritize & just divide things into projects one at a time. These houses can snow ball on you very quick from one thing to another. Thanks for sharing.


  • oldedeeres and MyBolens1053 have said thanks

#18 cityboy2977 OFFLINE  

cityboy2977

    ordinary average guy

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 6650
  • 117 Thanks
  • 179 posts
  • Location: Mancelona, Michigan

Posted November 18, 2013 - 08:40 PM

yep, old homes can be a joy and a pain. ive remodeled a couple that we totally gutted inside and out. ran into a few challenges to make things level & plumb. but patience is the key. and if you run into a situation that you cant figure out....always ask around for help. never ran into a person yet that knew everything...including myself.

 

lookin good to me. make sure you take lots of pics. for us and yourself in the future. always neat to look back on a project and remember how messed up it was before you bled and sweat to make it was it is today.

keep it up.


  • oldedeeres and MyBolens1053 have said thanks

#19 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

toomanytoys84

    Aaron

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 45129
  • 8,239 Thanks
  • 5,077 posts
  • Location: Ohio

Posted November 18, 2013 - 09:39 PM

Don't get overwhelmed, prioritize & just divide things into projects one at a time..


best advice. One room, one project and one thing at a time.
  • oldedeeres, Sawdust and MyBolens1053 have said thanks

#20 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

MyBolens1053
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 50025
  • 634 Thanks
  • 566 posts
  • Location: Martinsburg, WV (surrounded by Apple Orchards)

Posted November 18, 2013 - 11:20 PM

Looking good.i like that barn red. Are you going to top it off with a Mail Pouch Tobacco advert on one side?

I really ought to. Shouldn't I?  LOL.


  • oldedeeres said thank you

#21 oldedeeres ONLINE  

oldedeeres
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 14008
  • 5,848 Thanks
  • 3,191 posts
  • Location: Rivers End, Saskatchewan

Posted November 19, 2013 - 12:18 AM

That's a dandy old house. How many rooms? It's fun renovating a building that started with good lumber and a solid design, but it makes me angry when people break in and scavenge, no respect for other people's property. The last house we worked on was only about 20 years old, and I swear it was hand built by a one armed carpenter and his blind son, lol. Nothing was square, no even measurments, and had about three add-on  porches with uneven roof lines. However, as someone once said, it's a poor drywaller who can't correct a carpenters mistakes, lol. Thanks for the pics, we'll enjoy watching you bring the house back to life.


  • MyBolens1053 said thank you

#22 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

MyBolens1053
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 50025
  • 634 Thanks
  • 566 posts
  • Location: Martinsburg, WV (surrounded by Apple Orchards)

Posted November 19, 2013 - 01:31 AM

Thanks for all of the encouragement, everyone. I'll throw on some more pics of some of the progress.

Some of the newer pics are starting to show fuzziness. That is bacause the camera lense in my phone is getting all scratched up from items being in my pocket with the phone, Sorry everyone.

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 08-04-12_130748.jpg
  • 04-05-12_182314.jpg
  • 04-05-12_182345.jpg
  • 04-05-12_182405.jpg
  • 04-05-12_182424.jpg
  • 06-04-12_124933.jpg
  • 06-04-12_125004.jpg
  • 08-04-12_130522.jpg
  • 08-04-12_130545.jpg
  • 08-04-12_130606.jpg

  • oldedeeres said thank you

#23 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

MyBolens1053
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 50025
  • 634 Thanks
  • 566 posts
  • Location: Martinsburg, WV (surrounded by Apple Orchards)

Posted November 19, 2013 - 01:45 AM

That's a dandy old house. How many rooms? It's fun renovating a building that started with good lumber and a solid design, but it makes me angry when people break in and scavenge, no respect for other people's property. The last house we worked on was only about 20 years old, and I swear it was hand built by a one armed carpenter and his blind son, lol. Nothing was square, no even measurments, and had about three add-on  porches with uneven roof lines. However, as someone once said, it's a poor drywaller who can't correct a carpenters mistakes, lol. Thanks for the pics, we'll enjoy watching you bring the house back to life.

 

The layout of the place is (l to r and front to back):
1st Floor: Living Room, Dining Room (now Music Studio for teaching), Dining area and kitchen. Bath addition now occupies what was a porch off the kitchen and entry to the garage. Two bay garage with work space.

2nd Floor: Bedroom, Bedroom, Bath, Bedroom.

3rd Floor: Full walk-in attic.


  • oldedeeres said thank you

#24 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

MyBolens1053
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 50025
  • 634 Thanks
  • 566 posts
  • Location: Martinsburg, WV (surrounded by Apple Orchards)

Posted November 19, 2013 - 01:58 AM

The first thing I had to plan on was the bathroom for the first floor. The porch off the kitchen was a concrete slab and low ceiling. So the bath was started with the intent to raise the roof to the same level that the garage roof is now. That project will start Spring/Summer of 2014. Then the walls of the bath can be finished going upward and ceiling put in. Tile and paint and electric to be finished for that room, too.

Upgrading the electric panel and some wiring throughout the house right now. Ready to start the 2nd floor bath/laundry room and back bedroom. New wall layout, plumbing, electric and venting starts next week. I think I have enough pennies saved to floor the bath now. If not, the bank will see me for a request for more.


  • oldedeeres and TAHOE have said thanks

#25 TAHOE OFFLINE  

TAHOE
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 24522
  • 6,480 Thanks
  • 4,937 posts
  • Location: "Hamiltucky" Ohio

Posted November 19, 2013 - 10:16 AM

. About twenty five years ago I decided I enjoy remodeling the best. .

 

Well, when your done healing, get your butt up to hamiltucky, I can keep ya busy  HAHA


  • oldedeeres, Sawdust and MyBolens1053 have said thanks

#26 MyBolens1053 OFFLINE  

MyBolens1053
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 50025
  • 634 Thanks
  • 566 posts
  • Location: Martinsburg, WV (surrounded by Apple Orchards)

Posted November 20, 2013 - 08:58 PM

Spent a little time today in the basement/cellar insulating the water lines. You can see the pics above that I have installed PEX for my supply lines throughout the house. Getting started on the upstairs bath now and got to get the plumbing in before it gets too cold. Pics will be posted soon after.



#27 TAHOE OFFLINE  

TAHOE
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 24522
  • 6,480 Thanks
  • 4,937 posts
  • Location: "Hamiltucky" Ohio

Posted November 21, 2013 - 10:19 AM

What's the valve up on/in the wall for? Shut off valve or something?

I'm thinking of running PEX and using those same crimp type clamps for my next projects. I can get the crimper for about $35. The other style, those bands, wow, that tool is like $80


  • MyBolens1053 said thank you

#28 Sawdust OFFLINE  

Sawdust
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 36549
  • 4,521 Thanks
  • 2,829 posts
  • Location: Butler, Kentucky

Posted November 21, 2013 - 11:00 AM

What's the valve up on/in the wall for? Shut off valve or something?
I'm thinking of running PEX and using those same crimp type clamps for my next projects. I can get the crimper for about $35. The other style, those bands, wow, that tool is like $80


  • MyBolens1053 said thank you

#29 Sawdust OFFLINE  

Sawdust
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 36549
  • 4,521 Thanks
  • 2,829 posts
  • Location: Butler, Kentucky

Posted November 21, 2013 - 11:04 AM

That looks like his shower fixture without the cold water or the shower head head lines. I started to ask the same thing. The bands make a better connection vs the crimpers but like you said more $$.
  • MyBolens1053 said thank you

#30 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,447 Thanks
  • 6,612 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted November 21, 2013 - 11:37 AM

Could there be a chance that a screw or nail get poked into the supply lines running them so close to the wall ? Maybe not be in spot where that could happen anyway.


  • MyBolens1053 said thank you




Top