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Just A Reminder.

sweat shirt safety loose clothing

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#1 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2013 - 12:06 PM

Now that the cooler (cold) is upon us, most of us will be wearing more and bulky clothing.  I personally like the pull over hoodie sweat shirts.  The other day I was working in the shop using an angle grinder.  I happened to look down and saw the draw strings dangling precariously close to the angle grinder.

 

It made me stop and think that if they got caught in the grinder that would not be good!  So I thought it might be worth mentioning for all of us to be a bit more mind full of what you have on and tuck those draw stings inside the shirt out of the way. Make sure your sleeves aren't just hanging unbuttoned or you have anything loose that can get caught in either a moving object or get caught just moving around in the shop.

 

Also inspect that heater you have had stored for the summer. Make sure it is in good condition. 


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#2 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2013 - 12:16 PM

Good safety tips Bill! Just to expand on you heater comment. Never use an unvented heater of any kind in a closed space. Unvented heaters emit Carbon Monoxide abn water vapor. Carbon monoxide, as we know, will kill you. Heaters that say they have a O2 sensor and will shut off in case of O2 depletion will if in an closed area allow the buildup of CO to a concentration to make you ill. I have seen it and felt it. Likewise never run your small or large engines for an extended time in your garage or shop without ventilation. We nearly lost our Fire Chief that way several years ago. Secondly if you run an unvented heater in your work space you will cause any unprotected metal surfaces to draw moisture and rust. It will also make a film appear on your windows and walls, doors, equipment etc.. Just my 2cents worth on the subject. Stay safe and enjoy our hobby. Roger.


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#3 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2013 - 12:32 PM

A good tip Bill, thanks for posting it.

 

Dick


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#4 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2013 - 01:16 PM

Thanks Bill, And don't forget about those shirt tails hanging out. I wear a lot of long sleeve shirts as light jackets in the shop, but don't tuck in my shirt tail and it can get caught up in your work so be careful!!


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#5 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2013 - 01:19 PM

A very good point Roger.  Thanks for bringing that out.  What about electric heaters or the oil filled radiator type?


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#6 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2013 - 02:37 PM

If they ar electric they are good. just remember not to get any combustables near the filament that could start a fire. I have seen the oil filed electric heaters but have not seen them operate. Those should be good. Roger.


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#7 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2013 - 04:21 PM

Post reminds me of past experience.  I was sick of Cancer one time and got out of hospital kinda weak, yet tired of laying around. Went to garage and tinkered. Decided to mess with my "new" MM Z at the time, just got running earlier in year. SO, was running it in closed garage, got a little sick/light headed. Grabbed a lawn chair I use figuring maybe just too much action after treatments, and sat down. Was for several minutes I guess, I blacked out some. Later woke up and puked allover me and even crapped my pants big time! Finally was able to get up, shut off tractor, call on phone for help and made it to house to get into shower and wash myself off!  All this while being half out of it.  Sister came right away, insisted I go to Hospital for checking.  Sure enough they figured Carbon Monoxide poisoning and lucky to be alive. Not sure why I woke back up, but good thing I had.  My first and only experience with closed up garage and running engines.  Always open or outside now! 


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#8 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2013 - 04:44 PM

grumpy glad that you were ok after that. Also glad you beat the cancer. I too am a cancer survivor. I have gone on several calls for people overcome by CO when I was a Police Officer and a Firefighter / EMT.. Several were from accidental poisiong from vehicles and such running in a garage while working on them. Hope we can help someone out by telling a few of these stories. Stay safe. Roger.


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#9 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2013 - 05:57 PM

That make 3 survivors.  After reading your post earlier Roger, I was out in the shop and needed to move a hydro tractor. The cable for releasing the hydro is broken and I haven't repaired it yet so I decided to move it forward.  Keeping your post in mind I opened the side door and left it open.  Started the tractor and move if forward a few feet.  As I shut off the tractor I heard the wife drive up and went out side for a minute, when I walked back in I was shocked to how much fumes I could smell from just a short start like that.  From now on the big door is going open. 

 

Glad the both of you survived Cancer. Let's keep safety in mind at all times.


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#10 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2013 - 08:06 PM

yup same here My big compressor is down right now (starting capacitor I think, haven't had time to check)  5HP electric 220V powered...

I had furnace issues about a month ago (had to replace the elec control board to fix furnace)  In the process, I knew it was time to blow it all out, inside the furnace was all dusty from summer A/C usage.  My "backup" compressor is a 5 HP GAS,  L head B&S,  30 gallon on wheels.  It was gettin cold out, wife was bitchin about that and "on me" to get the furnace going.  I opened up the garage door and  wheeled the gas compressor just outside. I started the engine just long enough fo it to fill once and for the unloader to kick in/idle down then shut it off.  Used that tank of air and was almost done, just needed a couple more "shots" of air... I didn't want to leave the engine run any longer than needed because it was already dark out (neighbors, etc)  Since I didn't even need a full tank of air I fired up that 5HP Briggs in the garage after I shut the overhead door,  "just for a couple minutes"   The whole house quickly filled with fumes!  ended up having to open the windows and everything... The next morning (about 12 hours later) when I got up for work the house still smelt like fumes... it took a couple days for it to completely go away, I didn't un that compressor more than 3 mins maybe 4 mins , max.


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#11 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted November 19, 2013 - 08:40 PM

It is really surprising how fast those fumes accumulate and how long they linger.


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#12 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted November 27, 2013 - 03:07 PM

I used to know the ration for CO (carbon monoxide) poisioning in a human being while I was an EMT but have a foggy memory right now. I believe (again a guess right now) but somehow the number 20pm sticks in my mind. That's all the concentration it takes of CO to start affecting the human body. Now depending on device that is emitiing CO, temperature and size (length X width X height) of room the time of device running the concentration is multiplied by every minute. When I worked for my dads HVAC company an later in my last job I have seen and heard about people dying of CO poisioning in as little as 10 hours. Again the device used and room etc.. I hope we all remember this post as we enjoy this hobby. It also serves as a reminder that this can happen in the summer as well. Take care guys, have fun and enjoy our mutual hobby. Thanks. Roger.


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