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Diesel Question


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#1 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 01:34 PM

Now that winter is upon us (not enough to plow though), I have a question concerning diesel fuel.  At what temperature with diesel fuel begin to gel?  We've owned a diesel tractor since 1977 The Satoh that is my avatar at the moment) and have never had this happen so I don't know that it will even be an issue in my neck of the woods.  This year I will be relying on a diesel for the first time in many years so I need to know if I should treat the fuel to prevent this or not.  Chances are I'll wait till it warms up a little before plowing if I can but, given the fact I have no back up plow anymore and the neighbors rely on me, I figured I better ask the question.

 

I just got all 4 chains and the new plow on the Massey yesterday.  The plow just came in late last week.  That plow is a beast!  I gotta get me some weight on the back of that tractor.  Yes, I'll post a pic of it in its winter clothes as soon as I can get one.


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#2 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 01:44 PM

Thanks for the reminder! I need to get my diesels winterized.

 

I use this in my fuel and we have used it on the strip job for years and on days below 0 and have never had fuel problems.I use it in the fall when we start getting frost and until the frost leaves in the spring as it is cheap insurance against a freeze up.

 

You will probably be able to pick up some weight this Thanksgiving.

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 302677-20121005003207-power-service-diesel-fuel-supplement--cetane-boost.jpg

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#3 js5020 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 02:23 PM

Beings that you have no back up and you have others that depend on you I would use a fuel additive as "insurance".  I have depended on diesel for almost 30 yrs and I do not treat the fuel, but I do have only one place I get fuel from and I will not buy diesel from just anyplace, I have never had an issue in NE PA.


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#4 Dieselcubmike OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 02:50 PM

I would definitely look into getting some of that treatment fuel just to be on the safe side. Don't forget to check all your fluids and make sure everything is sturdy and topped off as well. 


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#5 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 03:13 PM

Adding 10% kerosene to the diesel fuel will also help cold starts.  Kerosene is more or less diesel fuel refined a bit further.  


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#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 03:39 PM

Like Username I am a believer in Power Service(since I worked in the truck stop 25 yrs ago) and add it to my fuel throughout the winter or in summer whenever I think my Ford is heavy on the black.  All Diesel pumps in Iowa have a sticker that says the fuel is blended below 34 degrees, so it may not be needed?

That said when I worked in the truckstop, I learned that the blending was based on the temp at the time the tanker was filled. So who could say if the temp dropped rapidly if it was blended right for the temperature?

 I have seen temps drop 10 degrees in an hour so it could be wrong by the time it was delivered?

 

So I add a little powerservice every time I fill my 5 gallon can in winter and never keep more than that on hand to prevent condensation in the can.  The Ford rarely burns a gallon per hour  and I never let it get below 1/2 a tank so that 5 gal is a lot of hours.


Edited by JD DANNELS, November 12, 2013 - 03:50 PM.

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#7 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 03:49 PM

I always treat my fuel, mostly because I don't use that much and it's sitting around for months some times. I use the JD fuel treatment. They make 2 versions for winter or summer. I also look at it as cheap insurance.


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#8 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 03:53 PM

The Ford rarely burns a gallon per hour  and I never let it get below 1/2 a tank so that 5 gal is a lot of hours.

That's the same as this Massey.  I'm finding it to be a real fuel sipper which is why I bought the one I bought.  I gotta tell ya, it's taken the wind out of my sails for old equipment.  I'm not sure where I will end up with that by winters end.


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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 04:18 PM

That's the same as this Massey.  I'm finding it to be a real fuel sipper which is why I bought the one I bought.  I gotta tell ya, it's taken the wind out of my sails for old equipment.  I'm not sure where I will end up with that by winters end.

 Yeah you have a sweet little guy in that Massey!!  The only time my Ford runs over 1700-1900 rpm is when I am running the tiller or brush cutter and I have to run 2500rpm to make 540 rpm at the pto so it burns less fuel than my 318. Pulling the blade, plow, rake etc I can run out of traction before I need more power/RPM.

Daniel is right about the Kerosene working just fine. The problem I have is there is only one place to buy kerosene in this town with a population  of 18,000. Where the Power Service is available in any place that sells fuel and the Farm Supply. I think I have bought two bottles of power service in the 14 month I have had the Ford.


Edited by JD DANNELS, November 12, 2013 - 04:20 PM.


#10 js5020 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 04:39 PM

Adding 10% kerosene to the diesel fuel will also help cold starts.  Kerosene is more or less diesel fuel refined a bit further.  

Now that you mention it I think this is what I have been doing kinda sorta,,, Ive even run Kero at much greater ratios in mine, the manufacturer states I can run #1 or #2.



#11 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 04:47 PM

As promised, some pics of winter Massey.

 

Massey blade 1.JPG

 

Massey blade 2.JPG



#12 js5020 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 05:15 PM

Nice ride!


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#13 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 05:49 PM

Adding 10% kerosene to the diesel fuel will also help cold starts.  Kerosene is more or less diesel fuel refined a bit further.  

 

 

Now that you mention it I think this is what I have been doing kinda sorta,,, Ive even run Kero at much greater ratios in mine, the manufacturer states I can run #1 or #2.

 

 

Actually 10% is just the minimum that would do much.  You can run straight kero in most all diesels.  Just it costs more.  We run at least 10% kero PLUS additives.



#14 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 07:33 PM

I had completely forgotten that I already picked up a bottle of Gumout diesel treatment that is supposed to prevent gelling.  Has anyone used this and is it any good?  Usually anything Gumout is good.


Edited by David Brown, November 12, 2013 - 07:34 PM.


#15 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted November 12, 2013 - 07:34 PM

I trust Gumout products! 






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