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Need Advice On Finishing Up Enclosing My Carport


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#1 sacsr OFFLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2013 - 10:36 PM

The concrete has a slow slope toward my carport. There is a section that was made that keeps the majority of the water from making it into my carport...but on a really heavy rain some does make it in. In closing off the front, most likely the water will reach the walls at some point. The span is 16 ft. I am going to frame out 4 ft on each side to leave an 8 ft wide opening for the doors. Under each side wall frame. I decided to put a pvc 1 x 4 down as a base then a 2 x4 pressure treated on top to attach my studs and sheathing to. I will drill holes in the concrete and bolt down the pvc board and pressure treated board together.. My thoughts are the pvc will not rot, so this set up should last for a long time......should I use silicon or something like liquid nails under it?? Is this idea crazy?? I am going to use a rubber garage floor bumper in the open space to keep the water from getting into the shed.

 

Here is a picture of what I plan on doing. The picture was taken in the dark so not the best shot......

IMG_3954.JPG


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#2 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2013 - 11:24 PM

I checked your profile, and it doesn't show your age, or how long

you plan on living, so it's a bit hard to answer your question. :smilewink:

For the price of a few dabs of silicone, I think you should do

it, just in case you live forever. :D


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#3 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2013 - 12:44 AM

Sounds like a good idea to me!


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#4 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2013 - 01:23 AM

How often will the water be above the 1" line? You might want to paint the 2x4 on the side x end x bottom with dry lock or something. Investigate it anyways, but I wouldn't do the top just to let it breathe.

#5 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2013 - 05:12 AM

I would try a heavier silicone under the pvc board and glue under the 2x4. The Quad is a thicker caulk for using in exterior. It won't let loose as quick.


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#6 sacsr OFFLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2013 - 06:24 AM

Water never gets much than a 1/4" high- it's just a trickle but it ends up inside the building. But it would slowly rot out even the pressure treated at some point.
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#7 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2013 - 11:45 AM

Make sure your concrete is very clean under the plate. Run three parallel beads of 100% silicone on the bottom & top of the PVC. When your done with the plate & before you cover the framing run a good heavy bead in the front corner of the PVC where it meets the concrete. Limit your anchors in this area also.


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#8 cityboy2977 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2013 - 08:07 PM

sill seal.

comes in 50'-100' rolls for 2x4 or 2x6. this is what is used between concrete foundations and (usually) 2x6 sill plate.

also used on walls that sit on a slab.

you could also go with a composit bottom plate instead of treated wood. use screws if ya do. it will never rot.


Edited by cityboy2977, November 05, 2013 - 08:16 PM.

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#9 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2013 - 07:04 AM

I'd go with the sill seal as well.  I think it's code here now, in fact.  I'd also suggest using screws as fasteners instead of nails.

 

If/when you go to insulate, I'd use extruded polystyrene for the bottom foot or so as well.  That way if it does get wet, it will dry instead of being destroyed like batt insulation.


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#10 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2013 - 09:56 PM

After rereading this and thinking a bit more, I think a heavy bead of glue would work really good. The pvc board is soft enough to flex with temperature change. It could pop a caulk bead. Using glue will hold it to concrete and seal also. 

 (At work we have the theory, glue is the framers friend. When in doubt, get the glue.) :D

 

Without the weight of a full wall, the sill seal might not compress enough to stop the water. I think it would be more of a moisture and vapor barrier than an actual water stop.


Edited by shorty, November 06, 2013 - 09:59 PM.

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#11 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2013 - 10:18 PM

The foam sill sealer in rolls is only to prevent air from entering.
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#12 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted November 07, 2013 - 07:56 AM

The foam sill sealer in rolls is only to prevent air from entering.

I was thinking of the rubber-like gasket used in slab on-grade construction.  Not sure the proper name, but it's purpose is to allow different rates of expansion and contraction between wood and concrete while providing a water and air-tight seal.



#13 cityboy2977 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 07, 2013 - 11:17 AM

The foam sill sealer in rolls is only to prevent air from entering.

 

sorry to say Sawdust, but that is partially incorrect. sill seal is to keep wood from contact with concrete. with a secondary use to fill imperfections in the concrete foundation.

insulation, vapor barrier, and Great stuff are used for air.

OP isnt trying to keep the water out. he cant with an 8' opening and doors. he just want to protect the wood from rotting.



#14 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted November 07, 2013 - 10:47 PM

sorry to say Sawdust, but that is partially incorrect. sill seal is to keep wood from contact with concrete. with a secondary use to fill imperfections in the concrete foundation.

insulation, vapor barrier, and Great stuff are used for air.

OP isnt trying to keep the water out. he cant with an 8' opening and doors. he just want to protect the wood from rotting.

 

sorry to say Sawdust, but that is partially incorrect. sill seal is to keep wood from contact with concrete. with a secondary use to fill imperfections in the concrete foundation.

insulation, vapor barrier, and Great stuff are used for air.

OP isnt trying to keep the water out. he cant with an 8' opening and doors. he just want to protect the wood from rotting.

Sorry cb I have to say my suggestion was based on the first part of the OP's opening post "The concrete has a slow slope toward my carport. There is a section that was made that keeps the majority of the water from making it into my carport...but on a really heavy rain some does make it in. In closing off the front, most likely the water will reach the walls at some point" That's his words not mine. This type of foam sill sealer like I mentioned is ONLY for air filtration & imperfections in the concrete beneath the sill plate. The manufacture may say it will resist water & will prevent moisture but not a down pour in his application where there is no sheathing passing the plate board to shed off water. I have been in the construction business for almost thirty five years & I have had my own business for over thirty years. This is a great product but not for his project.



#15 cityboy2977 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 08, 2013 - 12:56 AM

ONLY for air filtration and imperfections ? do you use this on inside partitions ? every home ive built on a slab, this is a requirement. inside and out.

no need to tell me how long you have been "in the construction business"....that doesnt mean a hill of beans to me.

"in the construction business" means a lot of different things to different people. 35 years ? then all your work should be done on phone and paper and the guys like me that bend the nails are out doing just that.

maybe next discussion we can compare whos trailer is bigger or whos saw kicks more amps.

 

all of my sarcasms aside, there is just no way to keep water out without raising the grade. this was only a suggestion to keep the lumber out of dampness. which is why i also suggested a composite lumber bottom plate.






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