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Power Steering Hydraulic Cylinder


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#1 artbuc OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2013 - 03:57 AM

Re my Gravely 18H (aka Ariens GT18): Over her almost 23 years, the life of the oring sealing the rod has steadily declined. When new, it would last 3-4 years. Now it only lasts 6-8 months before seeping a little oil. Ariens/Gravely no longer sells the rod, only the complete cylinder which is close to $500. I can have a new rod made up from chrome rod stock but I do not yet have a price. This seems like a better option than than re-chroming the old rod. Right now I am doing the old farmer technique of tieing a rag around the end of the cylinder until I get around to installing a new oring.

Ariens really cheaped out on this PS cylinder. Only one oring sealing the rod and no wiper. No wonder it does not last very long.

What have you folks done to upgrade/repair your PS hydraulic cylinders? Thanks.

#2 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2013 - 05:28 AM

Wow $500 bucks !   I'm guessing the rod is in pretty bad shape . if it wasn't maybe a quad ring would let the seepage livable .

 

 

http://www.theorings...x&cPath=367_111

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#3 artbuc OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2013 - 06:10 AM

Wow $500 bucks !   I'm guessing the rod is in pretty bad shape . if it wasn't maybe a quad ring would let the seepage livable .
 
 
http://www.theorings...x&cPath=367_111


Great suggestion! Thanks...I didn't know about these. Definitely worth a try.

#4 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2013 - 09:51 AM

Get the stuffing box fixed! It needs a wear ring in it to keep the rod from flopping around putting excess preasure on the o-ring making it wear and leak. Un less the rod is all scored up or pitted , replacing it won't fix this issue. :thumbs:


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#5 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2013 - 11:08 AM

I'm with Kieth on this. Look for the underlying cause of these failures and deal with that first. Maybe finding a better quality cylinder would be cheaper than having the rod fixed on the old one.



#6 artbuc OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2013 - 03:44 PM

Get the stuffing box fixed! It needs a wear ring in it to keep the rod from flopping around putting excess preasure on the o-ring making it wear and leak. Un less the rod is all scored up or pitted , replacing it won't fix this issue. :thumbs:


Thanks. How would I get this done? Drill/ream the stuffing box and press in a new wear ring?

#7 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 30, 2013 - 04:13 PM

It needs to be done in a lathe as the wear ring needs to be captured. While at it you could machine it for a quad seal/ packing. This would make it last at minimum another 23 years.

#8 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2013 - 05:33 AM

Keith , would this type of work something a small machine shop could do or do you have to find a hyd. shop that does cyl. ?



#9 artbuc OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2013 - 06:22 AM

It needs to be done in a lathe as the wear ring needs to be captured. While at it you could machine it for a quad seal/ packing. This would make it last at minimum another 23 years.


I like your idea but I am guessing the custom machine work would be close to the cost of a brand new cylinder.

Edited by artbuc, October 31, 2013 - 06:26 AM.


#10 artbuc OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2013 - 06:25 AM

Keith , would this type of work something a small machine shop could do or do you have to find a hyd. shop that does cyl. ?


I have the same question plus how would I go about specifying what wear ring I need to buy and the dimensions of the capture groove. Quadring has a great website with a lot of technical info. Maybe if I called them they could tell me?

#11 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2013 - 07:27 AM

This is a simple job , but reqires a lathe to do, any small machine shop could do it. Post a pic of the cylinder for me if you can? If it is a servicable unit, then this should be a cake walk for anyone who has a clue as a machinist. But you need to have the repair parts for them to measure up. :thumbs: 


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#12 artbuc OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 04:08 AM

This is a simple job , but reqires a lathe to do, any small machine shop could do it. Post a pic of the cylinder for me if you can? If it is a servicable unit, then this should be a cake walk for anyone who has a clue as a machinist. But you need to have the repair parts for them to measure up. :thumbs:

Yes, I will post pics when I get a chance. Right now I am busy with leaf removal so I need to keep her in service. I assume the rod cap is serviceable although I am not exactly sure what you mean by "serviceable". I believe the oring failure is due to compression set. I put in a new oring late last summer and ran her for a couple months with no leaks. Since we had no snow to throw, she sat in the garage unused all winter. When I took her out in the spring, the cylinder was leaking. Removed the oring and it had a flat spot. Looked like it was from the rod sitting on it all winter.

I was wondering if I could make an external wear ring using a shoulder oilite bearing which I could drill/tap and fix to the end of the rod cap. The external bearing would keep the rod centered in the rod cap. Can you visualize what I am suggesting?

Edit: Just checked out oilite shoulder bearings. OD of the flange will not be big enough to drill tap. Maybe I can bore the rod cap to accept a shoulder oilite bearing and make the bore enough deeper than the oilite bearing to create a groove for a second oring. I could also bore the oilite bearing so it will accept a wiper ring. I am beginning to see that there are many ways to improve the rod cap design.

Edited by artbuc, November 01, 2013 - 04:30 AM.


#13 artbuc OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 05:42 PM

Believe I have solved my problem. I can get a stock cylinder from Bailey for $100 which will be a substantial upgrade over OEM. No way I could modify existing rod cap and/or rod for that kind of money plus, once modified, it still will be inferior to a new one. The stock cylinder is the 3000psi Maxim with welded swivel ends. It has a wiper, wear ring and oring. Thanks to all for your helpful suggestions.
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#14 warren OFFLINE  

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Posted November 04, 2013 - 12:36 PM

You've got me interested in possibly replacing my steering cylinder so I checked out the bailey catalog and the maxim cylinders that I saw showed a 1 inch bore on the swivel ends?  I assume the Ariens cylinders have a 5/8" bore.  Yes/no???


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#15 artbuc OFFLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2013 - 11:42 AM

You've got me interested in possibly replacing my steering cylinder so I checked out the bailey catalog and the maxim cylinders that I saw showed a 1 inch bore on the swivel ends?  I assume the Ariens cylinders have a 5/8" bore.  Yes/no???


All of the GT's take the same PS cylinder and they have 5/8" bore on the swivel ends.




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