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Trying To Determine What Gt To Buy


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#31 jeff_gt OFFLINE  

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Posted October 29, 2013 - 12:28 PM


The first problem I see is that a good lawn mower that will take care of your 'good' lawn is NOT suitable for what you describe as "weedy" areas.  Also, you won't be happy dragging the belly mower out from under it any time you want to do garden work.

Just my two cent.  Look forward to seeing what decisions you make.

Hi Howard,

     you have a good point about the mower deck. Do you think if it were all the way up, that it would get in the way if pulling a motorized tiller? I could see it smacking into the furrows.  :-)

     I guess John Deere doesn't have a drive over deck for nothing.



#32 Papasmirf OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 05:01 AM

I have had a New Holland TC 30, 30hp, 4x4, 9 spd. Manual trans. Tractor with FEl (model 7308), 62" tiller, bb, angle blade, post hole digger, grapple, forks, manure spreader for spreading compost on my garden, and a 3 point broadcast spreader. I went to 5 dealers and the NH dealer was the only one to let me test the tractor. I thought I needed a 40 hp, but after talking to me I tried the 30hp and have never not been very pleased. This is one tough tractor. I also have a brush hog. For the garden, the 3 point pto tiller makes great seed bed. I purchased the tractor new in 2007 and have had no problems at all. Good luck to you.
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#33 jeff_gt OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 06:46 AM

I have had a New Holland TC 30, 30hp, 4x4, 9 spd. Manual trans. Tractor with FEl (model 7308), 62" tiller, bb, angle blade, post hole digger, grapple, forks, manure spreader for spreading compost on my garden, and a 3 point broadcast spreader. I went to 5 dealers and the NH dealer was the only one to let me test the tractor. I thought I needed a 40 hp, but after talking to me I tried the 30hp and have never not been very pleased. This is one tough tractor. I also have a brush hog. For the garden, the 3 point pto tiller makes great seed bed. I purchased the tractor new in 2007 and have had no problems at all. Good luck to you.

How large an area do you garden? I'm also curious what the entire rig cost you. Just curious. It looks like you have all the goodies.

     This prior question posed by HowardsMF155 was a very good one for me being a newbie. It's probably such an obvious one to other folks that it was just a given. But, the mower deck issue helps support the two-machine suggestion. That is if you don't have an expensive John Deer with the easy drive on mower deck.

      But, I was poking around and ran into this video about BCS rotary plow and was amazed at how easily it appears to be breaking up solid ground.

      That is one situation I will have multiple times because I'll be starting with a small garden and probably enlarging it over time. So, if I had one of those I could pull it out and break up another 1/4 acre at will. What I wondered though is whether there was one of these rotary plows that can be attached to a tractor? I could only find one non-motorized old Gravely unit. Anyone know of a motorized or at least pto powered rotary plow?



#34 jeff_gt OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 07:29 AM

I really have to be missing some fundamental logic or piece of information. I see many folks who really like BCS, Grillo, Berta, rotary plows. They just love them. So, why in the world wouldn't there be a tractor capable version, old Gravely excepted? Could it be that the width of the two-wheel machines is so narrow making them somehow more useful ? Tractor tires go over the prior row ? If the unit were sort of straddled to one side of a tractor, that might work better than being directly behind or in front of the unit except that you'd have to go one direction only. So, get done with a row, and drive all the way back to the other side and go again. Am I nuts?



#35 Walkinman1 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 08:04 AM

There were several brands that had tillers powered by the tractor's engine by one means or another, MTD, case, Bolens, cub cadet, John Deere and wheel horse come to mind but I know I'm missing some in there... Never personally used one yet but I know many people who love them.

#36 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 08:54 AM

The rotary plow as used by Gravely was a way to allow the engine to put its power directly into turning over the soil.  It was an excellent solution for a lightweight power unit.  Four wheel tractors are generally larger and heavier than two-wheel units, plus you have the operators weight.  Easier and less complicated/expensive in that case to use a simple moldboard plow.  When used correctly, all plows can plow in a gradually widening circle, up one side and down the other of your garden.


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#37 jeff_gt OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 12:26 PM

There were several brands that had tillers powered by the tractor's engine by one means or another, MTD, case, Bolens, cub cadet, John Deere and wheel horse come to mind but I know I'm missing some in there... Never personally used one yet but I know many people who love them.

Odd that I haven't seen hide nor hair of them...only Gravely. Also seems peculiar that with the good writeups from Gravely owners, that I can't find it as an option on a new unit. I was thinking of a BCS type of thing for the garden if I couldn't find one to attach to a tractor, then maybe a zero turn mower. But, it's my understanding that BCS is very expensive. I've only seen one price so far, but I think it was about $6k. No idea if that is for a low end, high end or what but it's pretty pricy.



#38 jeff_gt OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 12:29 PM

 Easier and less complicated/expensive in that case to use a simple moldboard plow. 

I've only seen photos of moldboard plows, but I read that they can be rather tricky to use. Would a stationary plow like that mince up the dirt as well as a rotary plow? I guess you follow up a plow with a tiller anyway? Sorry for my ignorance. Much learning needed.



#39 jeff_gt OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 12:35 PM

Here's some bcs prices. At least I have a better idea now, but I would need to figure out what size unit

would work for me. That is if I went this route at all. Maybe a moldboard plow might be a better option. I'll just keep reading.

http://www.earthtool...tor_prices.html

odd name by the way....moldboard. I'm sure there's some good or at least historically applicable reason it's got such an interesting name.  :-)



#40 Walkinman1 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 12:46 PM

Jeff, my understanding is that a moldboard works best for sod breaking as well as compacted soil, you can either follow it up with a disc or rototiller depending on your preference. A rototiller can break hard ground but sometimes takes multiple passes as well as more power than a moldboard requires to pull. There's about as many ways to prepare a seed bed as there are people who do it, just read everything you can get your hands on and start trying the ideas that intrigue you :D

#41 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 07:52 PM

I think you would want one close to the top of the line from BCS. I had heard that some models with the smaller tires had trouble getting hung up. From what you described so far, it sounds to me like you would be wanting something bigger than a walk behind in a year or two. I agree it sounds like you would be best off with a mower and then a separate tractor for your garden. What size you need for the garden will only decided by the what you will enjoy running the best and how much time you want to spend gardening. My grandma had a garden that was a good half acre, and she had a Troybilt horse and pony to work it.



#42 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 01, 2013 - 08:19 PM

here's my 2 cents!

get 2 tractors ,a new one dedicated to mowing, possibly a zero turn or a larger GT to handle a 60" deck. then get a decent used tractor ( maybe a scut )for all your gardening and maintenance needs. you can always trade up so get your feet wet first then decide which way you really want to go. Maybe in a couple of years you may want a bigger garden or maybe none at all. So do your homework !

 

Just one last thought ! Look at most farms , they have more than one tractor that each have dedicated jobs. I am not suggesting one for each task, just don't put all your eggs in one basket!!

Good luck 

Tom


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#43 jeff_gt OFFLINE  

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Posted November 17, 2013 - 06:27 AM

Latest update...  We're making an offer on a house/property wherein the guy has a tractor and will sell it separately from the house deal. I thought you all would probably like this new development. I wanted to get your opinions on the model and also ask how I can determine the health of the tractor. I'm guessing that I can hire a mechanic to come out to the place and give it an evaluation sort of like we do with cars?

It is a Massey Ferguson 2402WD Type 2773. Comes with a brush cutter or mower ran by the pto on the back. I don't have any pictures at the moment but it looks fairly clean. Do those tractors come with an hour gauge ?



#44 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted November 17, 2013 - 07:53 AM

Is that a 240  two wheel drive Massey?  If so, yes, it should have an hour meter. It is more than enough tractor for your non-lawn duties.






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