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Frost And Heat


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#1 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 07:35 AM

We finally got a killing frost last night. It was a few weeks late this year. On the other hand, the heating season has started a month early. I had to build a fire in the woodstove last night. We are having mostly cloudy days so, the solar heat doesn't gain much. Last year we only had about 12 clear sunny days in the heating season. Normally its 4 times that. I burned more wood and had to keep the house cooler to save energy.

 

Couple of little bits of info: 1. A cord of dry hardwood burned in a good woodstove will give about the same amount of heat as 200 gallons of heating oil in your oil furnace. 2. Setting your thermostat down by 3 degrees will save 10% on your energy useage. Example: Go from the 78 the wife wants to 68 and you will save about 33%. Good Luck, Rick


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#2 michael.kitko OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 08:12 AM

I wish I could get my wife to understand the heating thing. Every year it is the same discussion. Some things never change.

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#3 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 08:40 AM

Tried not to turn the heat on here until the 1st of November but this year that didn't happen. If you turn your thermostat down during the day and up at night and then down again at night you will use up to 10% more fuel. Leaving the T-Stat set at a set point will also save you energy. "....Stay warm my friends....."   Roger.


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#4 jms180 ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 08:43 AM

We had a big frost this morning 28 early this morning. Turned on the heat last night. We use a heat pump which saves some on the heat bill. It turned cold about 2 weeks earlier than usual.


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#5 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 08:51 AM

Thanks for the info....

We have programmable thermostats. That is also a big help conserving energy....Sitting here on the love-seat reading GTTalk is also conserving (my) energy!


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#6 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 09:23 AM

I started the wood stove this year for the first time in years. I am hoping to save a bit on heating costs. So far I am using up scraps from work and free wood.


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#7 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 09:29 AM

I started the wood stove this year for the first time in years. I am hoping to save a bit on heating costs. So far I am using up scraps from work and free wood.

It can save alot. Fire it up when you get home from work and keep it going until you go to bed. It will save a bunch and it feels more comfortable. Keep some wood incase there is a blizzard and the power goes out. Saving the pipes from freezing will save lots of expense and headaches. Good Luck, Rick


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#8 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 09:35 AM

 Keep some wood incase there is a blizzard and the power goes out. Saving the pipes from freezing will save lots of expense and headaches. Good Luck, Rick

That is my goal, to have a heat source that isn't depending on the grid. I also have a coal stove which uses electric for the combustion fan and circulating fan. Coal has more than doubled in price in the last few years around here.


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#9 HANKG OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 03:40 PM

WOOD IS BY FAR THE CHEAPEST FUEL TO HEAT A HOME, NATURAL GAS IS SECOND IN ONE WAY HURRICANE SANDY HELPED ME SINCE IM ON THE COAST IN NJ I WAS ABLE TO GATHER MORE THAN TEN CORDS OF FREE WOOD FOR SEASONS TO COME. I ALSO USE THE CEILING IN MY REC ROOM WHERE THE STOVE IS LOCATED AS A RETURN PLENNIM A FAN PULLS THE HEATED AIR FROM THE THIRTEEN FOOT CEILING WHERE THE HEAT IS TRAPED AND CIRCULATES IT BACK THRU AIR CONDITIONING VENTS ALSO LOCATED IN THE CEILING OF EACH ROOM WORKES VERY WELL.
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#10 Titus OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2013 - 04:18 PM

I started splitting wood in June, because I was so busy with work working 6 days a week, I knew this time of year I wouldn't want to be outside in the cold doing it. I believe I have roughly a cord or so ready for this winter. I also had two oak trees that needed to come down this year, I split a bunch of that, plenty left over for next year to chop & split.

 

Our boiler went over last winter. It was original to the house, so after a bunch of number crunching, we went with a new oil boiler. Natural gas isn't out by us, we have no on site propane tanks, but we do have the fire place.

 

This home sadly doesn't retain heat very well. I've tried to keep the heat off, but at night, after the fire place is done and it's around 75* when I wake up, it's roughly 55* in the living room.  


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#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 05, 2013 - 09:21 AM

Have no wood on my property and don't burn wood.  While it is cool for those who do, I decided against it.

Did not think I could save any money doing so?

$40,000 for a 4X4 pickup, fuel for hauling, $200-400 for saws should have two or 3(extra Chains and fuel and time spent sharpening chains), $1000 for a splitter , Several weekends cutting hauling,splitting and stacking. You really have to like doing it to make worthwhile.. :wave:

I have done it in the past, but I like having the LP delivered to the door.

 

Our programable thermostat changes ery little anymore, We have a 7 month old Great Grandaughter in the house so have to keep the house a little warmer this year.


Edited by JD DANNELS, November 05, 2013 - 09:27 AM.

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#12 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2013 - 03:35 PM

I started splitting wood in June, because I was so busy with work working 6 days a week, I knew this time of year I wouldn't want to be outside in the cold doing it. I believe I have roughly a cord or so ready for this winter. I also had two oak trees that needed to come down this year, I split a bunch of that, plenty left over for next year to chop & split.

 

Our boiler went over last winter. It was original to the house, so after a bunch of number crunching, we went with a new oil boiler. Natural gas isn't out by us, we have no on site propane tanks, but we do have the fire place.

 

This home sadly doesn't retain heat very well. I've tried to keep the heat off, but at night, after the fire place is done and it's around 75* when I wake up, it's roughly 55* in the living room.  

Evaluate your insulation and windows. Plugging leaks and increasing your insulation on top can cut your heat loss. Most power companies have programs for evaluating your house and there are federal grants to help save energy. Our state is offering grants up to $25,000 to upgrade windows and insulation. I did it myself years before the programs. Good Luck, Rick


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#13 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2013 - 03:40 PM

Have no wood on my property and don't burn wood.  While it is cool for those who do, I decided against it.

Did not think I could save any money doing so?

$40,000 for a 4X4 pickup, fuel for hauling, $200-400 for saws should have two or 3(extra Chains and fuel and time spent sharpening chains), $1000 for a splitter , Several weekends cutting hauling,splitting and stacking. You really have to like doing it to make worthwhile.. :wave:

I have done it in the past, but I like having the LP delivered to the door.

 

Our programable thermostat changes ery little anymore, We have a 7 month old Great Grandaughter in the house so have to keep the house a little warmer this year.

That is a personnal decision. I have tried to point out that even paying $200 per cord will save money. It will replace $800 of oil and give heat even when the power is out. I am not familiar with LP. Can the LP work without electricity? Good Luck, Rick 


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#14 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted November 06, 2013 - 07:13 PM

Because of several reasons (insurance, no wood on this property, nebbie neighbors are a few) I do not have a wood stove here. We have one up at the farm and my parents have cut wood my entire life. Big savings, especially if you can use wood fuel as part of woodland stewardship.

Here, we have Nat Gas. Our house is small with short ceilings. Actually fairly easy to keep a reasonable temp and we only two nites ago turned on the furnace... Before that, it was one of those oil filled electric radiators keeping things warm enough.

I made a couple of modifications to our thermostat to save money. I think these upgrades are pretty much guaranteed to help some.
image.jpg
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#15 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted November 07, 2013 - 01:09 PM

Because of several reasons (insurance, no wood on this property, nebbie neighbors are a few) I do not have a wood stove here. We have one up at the farm and my parents have cut wood my entire life. Big savings, especially if you can use wood fuel as part of woodland stewardship.

Here, we have Nat Gas. Our house is small with short ceilings. Actually fairly easy to keep a reasonable temp and we only two nites ago turned on the furnace... Before that, it was one of those oil filled electric radiators keeping things warm enough.

I made a couple of modifications to our thermostat to save money. I think these upgrades are pretty much guaranteed to help some.
attachicon.gifimage.jpg

I like that!! We had a case in the office one time where one zone was cold all the time. It was discovered that one employee had rearranged her desk and had set her computer right below the thermostat. The heat the Computer generated fooled the themostat into thinking it was already too warm in that zone.


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