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How Many Watts Of Lights Can I Put On?


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#1 CMAC OFFLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 11:05 AM

I have a 1969 Ford 100 which has a stock K241 setup. I am looking to add some LED spotlights to the GT. Seeing as how the battery is not all that large it makes me wonder how much I can draw from the system before I start draining the battery even when blowing snow. The best bargain I can find is $28 for 834 lumens which covers 60 degrees for a cost of 18 watts. I was planning on buying two of these lights but don't know how much the starter / generator can put out and how much the tractor and stock lights eat up?

 

Anybody have any wisdom that they can impart?


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#2 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 12:05 PM

LED Lights are much easier on power than regular bulbs. An 18 watt bulb is only 1.5 amps. I would think there is enough extra output to support 2 of them which is only a 3 amp load. If you want to save some power try to switch out your tail lights for LED versions. You could probably save 2 amps of draw by doing that. A lot depends on the health of your existing charging system.


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#3 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 12:49 PM

Good question. I have a similar problem with lights and a cab heater. It will draw more than the generator can produce. It means that every so often I will have to shut off the lights and heater with the engine running to recharge the battery. The LED lights is a good idea. Good Luck, Rick 



#4 CMAC OFFLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 01:34 PM

I hear you Rick. Electrical heaters are always such a drain. I wonder if there would be a way of easily channeling heat away from the motor into the cab? That way it would just be the draw of a small fan rather than a heating element. I suppose a liquid cooled machine would have a rad that could suffice too.

 

clark


Edited by CMAC, October 23, 2013 - 01:36 PM.

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#5 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 03:24 PM

I put higher wattage bulbs on my PK. I wonder how much damage or wear it does to the sg trying to put out that kind of amps for such a long time ?
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#6 Moosetales OFFLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 04:03 PM

Hey Clark, here's some info I found helpful when I asked the same question in my thread for my '71 Case 444.

 

Follow these two links for some additional info the guys gave me when I was up against the same issue: http://gardentractor...actor/?p=269022 and http://gardentractor...actor/?p=269537.

 

Here's a snippet of what you'll find by following the above links.

 

"QUESTION: I don't run anything other then the headlights, they are upgraded bulbs. I don't know how much draw these tractors were designed to take before the charging system can't keep up any longer.

 

ANSWER: The formula for that is 12 watts=1amp at 12 volts take the amps of generator times 12 gives the watt output keep at least 50 watts free to charge battery .

 

QUESTION: Ok, so gopher, you're going to have to help me cause I'm slow on the uptake with all this electrical gibberish. If I have two 18.4 watt headlight bulbs and two 27 watt bulbs (one for my dash light and the other for m backup light) am I still within the 50 watt free zone to charge my battery? I don't run my reverse light all the time but if I did would I still be in the clear?

 

If my starter/generator puts out about 15 amps then multiplying that by 12 would bring me to 180 watts of output. Adding the wattage on my lights that brings me to an approximate total of 91 watts. This leaves me approximately 90 watts free to charge the battery. How did I do? Thanks.

 

ANSWER: That is correct I'm not sure how low you can have the charge watt I have 50 and know it works to keep battery charged.If you want to add more I would not go under 30 watts for keeping your battery charged. I'm assuming that would be like a 2 amp trickle charger."  


Edited by Moosetales, October 23, 2013 - 04:04 PM.

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#7 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 06:31 PM

Ohms Law & Watts Law relationship: Amps = Power/Voltage

 

36 watts, 12 volts.........36 / 12 = 3 Amps

 

This shouldn't overload your charging system at all!



#8 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 09:07 PM

I hear you Rick. Electrical heaters are always such a drain. I wonder if there would be a way of easily channeling heat away from the motor into the cab? That way it would just be the draw of a small fan rather than a heating element. I suppose a liquid cooled machine would have a rad that could suffice too.
 
clark


Way back, when I was learning the aircraft trade, I learned that small planes often use a manifold around the exhaust pipe to provide hot air. Fresh air passed in from the front and passed through the heat exchanger and then into the cabin.

It would take some fab on a tractor since the exhaust is so far away from the cab

#9 CMAC OFFLINE  

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Posted October 24, 2013 - 08:15 AM

If my starter/generator puts out about 15 amps then multiplying that by 12 would bring me to 180 watts of output.

 

It turns out that my starter/generator puts out the same 180 watts. So lights of 36 watts or so should be no problem. I will take the advice about replacing the stock lights with newer LED's as well. That should leave the engine and the battery with about 130 watts.

 

Does anyone know how much the engine takes to run?






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