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Review Of My Homemade Disc


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#16 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2013 - 07:25 PM

AND.....Our Southern Indiana clay is tougher to work than other soils......Just saying....


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#17 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2013 - 08:35 PM

 I know that many of you really enjoy doing things with your garden tractors. anything I say here isn't meant to be critical of the things you enjoy doing.

But you have to remember, more passes equals more time with your tractor.

 

I am more of a rototilling type right now, but I am hoping to get other types of ground working tools. So I am learning quite a bit here with all your troubles and the suggestions for fixing.

 

Could you easily take a torch and notch the discs? Or are they hardened and torching mess up the temper?

 

Would your tractor handle any more weight on the disc? I think mine would be maxed out, it looks like yours might be a bit bigger.

I have a few problems with more passes.

 

For me, working with a 400+ hp 4WD tractor that can make whatever implement you are pulling do what you want with just a nudge of a lever is very satisfying. Driving a 50 hp tractor can be satisfying in some situations. Driving a little garden tractor, constantly pushing it to its limits and still not getting the results I want is frustrating.

 

A -Having to make multiple passes to end up with only mediocre results only adds to the frustration as well as adding needless wear on everything involved.

 

B - Multiple passes wastes gas and my time.

 

C - Multiple passes, especially with a disc, contributes greatly to compaction.

 

I got this tractor and am making implements to be able to increase the size of my garden without having to invest a lot more of my time. As I and others have said, I am going to have to do more experimenting to find what chores this little tractor can do without strain to save me time in the garden.

 

I had thought about making notched blades when I first bought the discs, but wanted to see how it performed before investing a lot of time. As it turns out, I'm glad I didn't take the time to do it. Notched blades are used on discs of all sizes for more aggressive cutting, but it has to have the weight to make them work. I kept adding weight on my disc until the tractor couldn't lift it. I believe notching the blades would help some, but it would still require multiple passes and that just isn't acceptable to me.

 

A plasma cutter would let you notch blades without excessive heat.

 

Sorry to hear it hasn't worked out. All DIY projects are experiments to some extent. Use this as a learning exercise and keep improving the design. Some thoughts. Making it narrower would increase the pressure/square inch. What if you had some sort of scarifier to help break the soil ahead of the disc.

 

I did mention in my first post that I may make a smaller disc to make more weight per blade. Since I will rarely be breaking new ground, a disc is not going to be one of my regular tillage tools, and a smaller disc would be narrower than my tractor which gets back to the multiple passes that I want to avoid, I'm not going to spend much time on something I'm rarely going to use.

 

Are you planing on doing a no-till like they do at the Rodale Farm ? But on a small scale ? I'm trying a mulched type garden with transplants in it. It's using more mulch then I I thought it would take , right now have 2 rows  about 85 feet long with the cover crop / mulch growing between

http://gardentractor...sses-for-mulch/

 

 

http://rodaleinstitu...rganic-no-till/

I had never heard of the Rodale Farm, so I read a little about them this evening. Their methods are interesting. I think I would need a bigger operation to be able to use their methods.

 

I do like the results of mulching to control weeds, but mulching my entire garden would be too labor intensive.

 

I feel the same way but I can't swing our 16'er and big tractor in my plot. I recently bought that double gang set and it didn't do what I hoped it would do. I'll be changing the cutting angle and adding weight in the spring. It should help. I too am as no till as possible.

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You pretty much summed up the plan for my garden; try to be as no-till as possible/practical.

 

AND.....Our Southern Indiana clay is tougher to work than other soils......Just saying....

I have had great success improving the clay soil I have by adding large amounts of sawdust.


Edited by freedhardwoods, October 16, 2013 - 08:56 PM.

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#18 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2013 - 10:01 PM

I hope you find an implement that will work as you hope.

As for the corn stocks, why are they left? I assume for compost. Maybe compost off the garden and bring it back a opulent years later?
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#19 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2013 - 05:49 AM

Just wondering how you were going to do the no-till ? Maybe start a new thread in the gardening section . I might want to use some of your ideas . I'm always up for trying something new



#20 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2013 - 07:14 AM

I hope you find an implement that will work as you hope.

As for the corn stocks, why are they left? I assume for compost. Maybe compost off the garden and bring it back a opulent years later?

 

 

Using my Troybilt tiller would usually take 3 passes to get cornstalks chopped up and even then my little push planter would have a hard time getting through. Because I always hill my corn, I cant mow it with my lawn mower first. This year I took the time to cut the stalks and stack them along the side.I then planted green beans and soybeans with the intentions of scattering the cornstalks on the bean foliage before I mow it this fall. It was somewhere in this process that I started thinking this is a lot of work and if I double the size of my garden, I don't have time for this.

 

I had several options in my head when I started my experimenting and since the disc won't do what I want, I am going to concentrate on making a min-till planter so I can use residue to my advantage and cut down on time invested and equipment wear. I also need to come up with a mower that will work in the hilled corn stalks.

 

I do appreciate all the input and am always looking for ideas that will help.


Edited by freedhardwoods, October 17, 2013 - 07:47 AM.

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#21 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2013 - 08:01 AM

Just wondering how you were going to do the no-till ? Maybe start a new thread in the gardening section . I might want to use some of your ideas . I'm always up for trying something new.

Sometimes I don't explain myself very well. Most of my garden will be min-till if I can get the planter to work like I want. I may mulch my staked plants. More experimenting to do before I have a set plan.


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#22 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2013 - 10:57 AM

Will you be planting a cover crop then kill it by crimpimg or cutting when it full grown but before flowering stage  ( might not be correct term ) then planting ? Just wondering how you will work around the weeds .



#23 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2013 - 11:11 AM

I'll start a thread on my no till method for you

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#24 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2013 - 12:23 PM

I'll start a thread on my no till method for you

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:thumbs:   Any info that will save me time and work is a good thing

Will you be planting a cover crop then kill it by crimpimg or cutting when it full grown but before flowering stage  ( might not be correct term ) then planting ? Just wondering how you will work around the weeds .

I used to only plant a cover crop of soybeans after corn. After harvesting the corn I would

A - Run the tiller through the standing stalks with the rows to knock down the hills and stalks, then crosswise to level and chop up the stalks more.

 

B - I would scatter soybeans and a little 6-24-24 by hand and lightly till them in.

 

C - In the fall I would mow the soybeans and till them in and I was done until spring.

 

Right now I don't have a plan set in concrete for the weeds other than cultivate and probably using a hoe in some places. Before it's done, I may be doing just what you said - working around the weeds.  :rolling: 

I hope it works out better than that though.



#25 BairleaFarm OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2013 - 12:28 PM

Its in the garden section

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