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Plumbers? Need To Install Clothes Washer Drain....


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#16 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2013 - 01:53 PM

Thanks, that maybe the ticket then for dryer. I usually clean our current dryer vents every 6 months or so, I know how many house fires can be prevented by normall clean out, people just don't realize the issues involving dryer lint.



#17 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2013 - 05:39 PM

Here is how I did my wash machine lines and drain. As you can see, I ran 2" PVC as my main drain line, and then y'd off of that with 1 1/2" for the vent. My vent will be capped off at the top with a threaded studer valve, which uses the air in your stud wall cavity to vent. I however, will be cutting a 4" high x 12" wide hole in the wall, and covering it with a return air grille cover, just for the satisfaction of knowing the valve will be able to suck enough air in order to work properly. 

 

 

Miscellaneous 8 035.JPG Miscellaneous 8 036.JPG

 

 

This is my trap just below the floor joists, which is roughly 4' below my wash machine drain entry shown above. After the water runs through the trap, it will travel roughly 6' horizontally before running down vertically into the main 4" sewer line.

 

 

Miscellaneous 8 039.JPG Miscellaneous 8 040.JPG

 

 

And like you, I will be running my dryer vent down through the floor into a 90*, between the floor joist, and out through the side of the house. I bought 4" stove pipe to run my vent, but I'm thinking I might change to the 4" PVC. My only concern or question is, do you just dry fit the connections so that you can disassemble for clean out? Surely you don't glue the connections, do you?


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#18 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2013 - 08:10 PM

Thanks for pics!!!

I think that plug is supposed to be ground fault though, at least in my area, code is 6' within water must be GFI.

Yours looks a lot like mine will, really helps.

I don't know about gluing the PVC, guess on a dryer vent it shouldn't really matter as there is no pressure. Most time even with a dry fit, you can't hardly get them apart.


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#19 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2013 - 08:28 PM

"Can you use PVC for venting?"

Depends on the area. Local codes are different on this, it also depends on who is deciphering the phrase "flammable material". There is a development near us that is HUD approved and they used 4" plastic up 2 stories and out the roof with no flapper. Can't imagine how much cold air rolls down that in the winter.

Nuts and bolts, I would advise at least 2 sections of metal just because of Murphy's law. But Given the open situations I see here, I would use metal. You can order it in at least 2 & 5' lengths thru plumbing places, other sizes may be available. Also, use aluminum ducting tape on the seams, not duct tape. Duct tape dries out and falls apart.
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#20 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2013 - 09:30 PM

Thanks for pics!!!

I think that plug is supposed to be ground fault though, at least in my area, code is 6' within water must be GFI.

 

Shhh! You aren't supposed to see that! 

 

The outlet shown is only temporary. I will be using the ground fault after I have all of the drywall dust and painting completed.


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#21 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted October 17, 2013 - 07:39 AM

I've done some reading on dryer vents, since mine will only be maybe an 8-10' run, I will most likely use 6" round metal. some of the articles stated that a larger outlet on a dryer cuts down dry time which saved $$$ , even though you are only coming out of dryer with 4"...volume of air or somethng like that :smilewink: I've got the room under there and can use a 6" range vent outside vent with cover/flap.

 

I used to get flack about using PVC when I made a cold air intake on my Astro Van....everyone kept warning me about melting. Guess they don't realize it had outside air temp coming through it on regualr basis, but I degress...... Dryer air would be much hotter so I will stick with metal.  


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#22 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted October 22, 2013 - 03:24 PM

Hey Johndeerelefman, thanks for info on the Studor valve, I did not know that existed.

I want to add, while researching that valve, knowing what I know about plumbing, and looking at your pics you posted, I think I am seeing a critical error on your venting. 

A vent is there to prevent a negative pressure from building up in between the trap and outlet/main sewer pipe which then prevents a suction, it is normally placed between trap and main trunk. If that suction was there, it would drain the trap causing sewer gas to escape basically removing the trap function from the system. Looking at your pics, while you put vent in to add extra air in you system, it's appears to be on the wrong side of the trap so I'm afraid you have a great possiblility of creating that vacuum and draining your trap.

Unless I'm not seeing everything in your pics, I think you need to re-plumb and put the vent in between the trap and your main trunk line.

Someone else please confirm or deny what I'm seeing for JDE!!!!


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#23 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 22, 2013 - 06:50 PM

Someone else please confirm or deny what I'm seeing for JDE!!!! [/size]


Yep, you got it.
A negative pressure will not be solved before the trap is opened. The only other end around would be to seal the drain pipe into the stand pipe. All of the mfgs out there have stopped advising that so far as I know... So, if you brought the 1.5" thru the floor, and put the y just after the trap (downhill side) you should be OK.
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#24 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 09:06 PM

Aw, come on guys, don't make me change this! I checked with two local plumbing suppliers, and they both told me that I would be ok, since the drain tie-in isn't the last run of the sewer line. The washer drain connects to roughly the center of the entire run of the main sewer line. You can't imagine what I had to go through in order to get this washer drain in, and now you want me to re-route my vent pipe? Are you both 100% sure about your advice?



#25 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 23, 2013 - 09:11 PM

Troy, I would check with a plumber... Because I'm not one... But reason this with me.
If the water running down the main pipe causes a vacuum down stream from the washer, where is the vacuum break? That black cap is supposed to be a break for siphons... I looked at the pic the other day and didnt see it.. So blame TAHOE ( :D )

Seriously, I would check with a plumber with the pics. If you don't, every time you let the tub out, you may be smelling vapors in the laundry room...
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#26 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted October 24, 2013 - 08:46 AM

I'm not a licensed plumber, only what I've learned over the years and from the intraweb! I cannot say I am 100% correct, but...

I just don't see how that extra vent is doing anything in preventing a vacuum/siphon. I would think you would get enough air around the washer drain hose just stuck in the drain box to do the same thing as you have the vent in now. It's only my opinion, I would move it....especialy with that vertical drop you got, man the water sure can start pulling some vacuum with water dropping those few feet.

Even though you maybe in the middle of the main trunk as in pipe lengths, your washer drain will fill with water and that main trunk is not going to give any venting in that line.

Before you close it up, grab your garden hose, stick it in the drain and start it as a test or even somehow put a 5 gal bucket full of water above it with a valve/hose to similate the washer dumping. That maybe an easy test to determine if you have an issue. I would repeat several times. If you create a vacuum, you may hear some gurgling once you get to the end of the water dump.


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#27 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted December 05, 2013 - 10:50 AM

Ok, this is drawing near as I get ready for demo and reconstruction....

 

I had a thought, yea, they hit me every once in a while, can be scary too :rolling:

If I drain washer into a tub or in floor drain that does outside, I would not have a need for vents or even a trap....?

I was going to hook into the sewer system and drain it into septic tank, but It just occurred to me, actually my mother had the idea, to just drain it like the current washer does.....into the big drain tub which then goes into floor drain and that dumps down and out over in the ditch. Been draining washer liek that for 42 yrs. It would only be an extra 10' or so of PVC pipe.

I could just use 2" or larger pipe and dump into tub.



#28 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted December 05, 2013 - 07:47 PM

That would be your easiest solution. This was the typical way of draining a washer before the wall drain mounts became the norm. Make sure the drain is mounted good over the tub, they have a tendency of hoping out when the pump kicks on...I know this for sure :)

#29 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted December 05, 2013 - 08:10 PM

You will have to watch, some places forbid that altogether, some will allow grandfathering, it's generally frowned on.

Most places want it to go into the septic, but many will accept a "dry well" as an alternative. Our dry well was a plastic barrel cut in half lengthwise laid in the ground like a dome and lots of gravel under it. It was buried about 3 feet down.

Worked fine until city sewage came along. Had been there like it is for 20 years with only one clean out needed because of lint.

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Posted December 05, 2013 - 08:47 PM

Most any regs don't allow that these days Marty.  Mine had been like that all our lives, but I knew the time would come that someone would report it, so a few years ago I coupled mine to my sewer system.  I also knew my lateral lines wouldn't be able to handle it, so I extended them about 50' into a deep pit filled with gravel.  The pit was 6' wide and I put a base of gravel 2' deep with the gravel being a good 2' from the surface.






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