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Trial Run For 2 Of My New Implements


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#1 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 06:28 PM

I tried using 2 shanks on my ripper, but quickly found that one was all my tractor wanted in this well established sod. I made passes about a foot apart. I couldn't run as deep as I wanted. I averaged about 6" or 7" deep. More weight on my drive wheels probably would have helped.

 

I followed up with my field cultivator. The first pass showed me I had to take the gauge wheel off. I was dragging up huge piles of sod with it on. I couldn't get the sweeps to dig in like I wanted. The old sweeps are very worn and rounded. New, pointed ones would probably make quite a difference.

 

I am used to massive implements that weigh thousands of pounds. One pass with them does more than a dozen passes with the little toy equipment my small tractor can pull. With that said, breaking new sod should be pretty rare for me.

 

I will make a couple passes with my tiller to finish preparing this new 12'x200' spot. Using my tractor to get things loosened up saved an enormous amount of work compared to trying to do it all with my Troybilt.

Attached Thumbnails

  • RIPPER THEN FLD CULTIVATOR.jpg

Edited by freedhardwoods, October 13, 2013 - 06:31 PM.

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#2 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 07:19 PM

Looks like a good trial run. I would say that they broke up the sod fairly good.



#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 07:22 PM

Is that a turning plow or the ripper you built? A turning plow would make a big difference.

#4 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2013 - 05:49 AM

A turning plow would make a big difference

 

  Would a turning plow work better because of the way the point runs ahead of the moldboard pulling the rear wheels down ?



#5 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2013 - 07:13 AM

Would a turning plow work better because of the way the point runs ahead of the moldboard pulling the rear wheels down ?


On new dirt with lower Hp and traction, a turning plow is designed to slice thru the ground and roll it over. This is especially useful when dealing with a sod situation. Even a turning plow can have difficulties with sod...

Short story, 20 some odd years ago, when they were cleaning up around where they put the shallow gas well at my parents, the lease said they would scarify the dirt around to allow the field to recover. They were almost moved out when Dad reminded them.
The dozer operator was kinda huffy about the whole thing. He went over to the one with a scarifier on it... Big old CAT with 5 shanks. He backed into the corner of the lot, dropped the teeth, and stalled the machine. He could not believe how packed that ground was.
He ended up not being able to remove shanks, so he went in 1st and 2nd.

Scarifiers are kinda brute force tearing, vs the plow rolling it over. With smaller machines, I think roll over is easier on equipment and easier to prep.

All that said, I think the rippers did a nice job loosening things up and should give the troybilt a much easier time of it.
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#6 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2013 - 01:41 PM

I knew the ripper and field cultivator would leave all the sod on top. I used the ripper because I wanted to break up the soil as deep as possible and I knew it would go deeper than the moldboard plow. I used the field cultivator instead of the disc because the disc's performance is a big disappointment. More on that later.

 

The dirt is loose now so shredding the sod with the tiller might be a one pass operation.


Edited by freedhardwoods, October 14, 2013 - 02:27 PM.

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#7 Robert Webb OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2013 - 01:47 PM

The moldboard would roll it over so that it would be buried for the grass to decompose........no need to worry about trying to till it until spring.



#8 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2013 - 07:09 PM

The moldboard would roll it over so that it would be buried for the grass to decompose......

It also leaves little residue on top which invites erosion. The existing garden to the right in the picture has a very slight slope. I did my fall tilling last year after mowing everything to a fine mulch. That left the ground almost bare and by spring it had eroded pretty badly.

 

I have decided to adapt my gardening methods to follow some of the methods most farmers use today. That is why I wanted a ripper and field cultivator. One major difference is that most farmers control weeds with chemicals and I am intending to be chemical free.

 

It's hard to find a farmer that uses a moldboard plow. Most don't even own one. I have one, but don't know that I will ever use it.

 

I am going to put a coulter on the front of my planter so it can cut through residue and be a minimum tillage planter.


Edited by freedhardwoods, October 14, 2013 - 07:37 PM.


#9 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2013 - 07:31 PM

On new dirt with lower Hp and traction, a turning plow is designed to slice thru the ground and roll it over. This is especially useful when dealing with a sod situation. Even a turning plow can have difficulties with sod...

Short story, 20 some odd years ago, when they were cleaning up around where they put the shallow gas well at my parents, the lease said they would scarify the dirt around to allow the field to recover. They were almost moved out when Dad reminded them.
The dozer operator was kinda huffy about the whole thing. He went over to the one with a scarifier on it... Big old CAT with 5 shanks. He backed into the corner of the lot, dropped the teeth, and stalled the machine. He could not believe how packed that ground was.
He ended up not being able to remove shanks, so he went in 1st and 2nd.

Scarifiers are kinda brute force tearing, vs the plow rolling it over. With smaller machines, I think roll over is easier on equipment and easier to prep.

All that said, I think the rippers did a nice job loosening things up and should give the troybilt a much easier time of it.

Many people have no idea how much power it takes to work ground below plow depth. When I was helping a local farmer condition reclaimed coal mine ground, he had a 150 hp 4wd tractor pulling a 5 shank ripper 18" deep. He had to use his 300 hp 4wd tractor to pull a 3 shank ripper 24" deep.






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