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Remodelling Advice Needed


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#1 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 08:45 PM

I'm remodeling two rooms in our house, and combining them into one large kitchen/dining room. I ran a 30" deep x 14" high soffit around the perimeter of the room, one for accepting my upper cabinets, and two for giving the appearance of a trey ceiling. As I said, the soffit is 14" high, but I will be framing in another soffit off of that which will be a 7" deep x 7" high step. This will give the appearance of a double step. Large crown molding will be run around the perimeter of both of these soffits. The high ceiling size, when finished, will be roughly 12'-0" wide x roughly 20'-0" in length. I'm planning on using six recessed 6" can lights, spaced evenly for both the width and length of the ceiling, meaning the lights will be placed around 4'-0" in from the width on both long sides, and 5'-0" centers running the length of the long sides. ( : : : )

 

My question is this. I have two new ceiling fans, without light kits, that I would like to place in the center of each four light grouping

: + : + : ). Do you guys think this will look right? How would you wire them up, meaning, would you wire both ceiling fans to one switch, or would you wire them individually? (one switch to each fan)  Keep in mind, the recessed can lights will all be operated from one switch, and one ceiling fan will be located in the kitchen area of the room, and the other fan will be located in the dining room area of the room. I'm also going to install a tin ceiling looking material to the high ceiling. I'm just not sure if it's going to look too busy, or if it will look fine. Our house was built in 1889, and has a lot of old wooden charm throughout. It was supposedly a ritzy house back in it's day, and I'd kind of like to keep the elegant and sophisticated beauty that it deserves. 

 

I hope I don't have you all confused as to what I'm trying to ask.


Edited by johndeereelfman, October 12, 2013 - 08:53 PM.

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#2 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 09:39 PM

Very well explained....I like your light & fan symbols. I would switch the two lights separately. You may not want the air movement in both areas at the same time.
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#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 09:56 PM

I second the separation of the fans. Get the fans and matching speed controllers that can mount in the switch box. you dont always want high speed fans and six foot of chain would be a pain.
I also advise three way switches for the lights. Not that much harder and lots better.
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#4 pwombles OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 10:02 PM

I would wire the fans separate and the lights to your using. Think of how and when they will be used. 3way switches on the lights are a must.


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#5 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 10:09 PM

Gotta love the three way switches. And another thing, if you are planning on crown  you could put recessed lighting above that. That would shine across the ceiling giving you indirect lighting. 


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#6 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 06:19 AM

I agree with separate switches for lights and fans.
Here is one thing to investigate; make sure the lights are far enough away from fan, or when both are on it will feel like a 60's light show. I did the same pattern in my first game room and the fan blades cut the light, it was bad on the eyes. I had to cut the ceiling open and move them a couple feet away from diameter of the blades. The lower the fan the farther away they need to be.
image.jpg
Install speed controls for switches too , then you won't need the cords hanging, just have to reach up to flip direction on the motors .
Good luck, Tom

Edited by TomLGT195, October 13, 2013 - 06:29 AM.

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#7 JDGuy445 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 06:43 AM

I would wire them together. If you do it correctly, I have a ceiling fan I can control by the cord and I keep  the switch on for as I go.


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#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 07:07 AM

There are fans now that are remote controlled. A little more expensive but more convenient and the wiring is dead simple.   Are you sure the pot lights are going to give you the coverage and light quality you want. Flush mount fixtures would give a more even light.  A kitchen normally requires task lighting as well as overall coverage from a central fixture. A dining room would want light directly over the table area. Some switched outlets are useful in general purpose rooms in case you need floor lamps at some point.  It is not simple to figure out what to do and to balance cost with versatility and function. 


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#9 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 07:19 AM

I agree with separate switches for lights and fans.
Here is one thing to investigate; make sure the lights are far enough away from fan, or when both are on it will feel like a 60's light show. I did the same pattern in my first game room and the fan blades cut the light, it was bad on the eyes. I had to cut the ceiling open and move them a couple feet away from diameter of the blades.
Good luck, Tom

I think a found a family video of your room?
:rolling:


Saw that once with fluorescents... It's almost enough to make me nauseous when reading.


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#10 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 07:27 AM

I can just see me walking through the kitchen with that kind of light show going at 4:00 in the morning. Couldn't handle that, at least until I have enough coffee in me! 



#11 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 07:30 AM

As for work lighting in the kitchen, I will be installing low voltage puck lighting under the upper wall cabinets, and there will also be a suspended pendant light hanging down above the kitchen sink.

 

I think I'll have enough lighting, and will be good to go, at least until the first airplane lands, then I'll have to start the process of elimination. 



#12 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 07:34 AM

I also would wire the fans separately.  On the pot lights, they tend to be directional, which is fine under the cabinets, but for the open room, they might not light the entire area as well??  Even Mike Holmes (from TV) doesn't care for pot lights, but for him it's more a point of heat/cooling loss than lighting aspects.


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#13 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 12:41 PM

There are fans now that are remote controlled. A little more expensive but more convenient and the wiring is dead simple.   Are you sure the pot lights are going to give you the coverage and light quality you want. Flush mount fixtures would give a more even light.  A kitchen normally requires task lighting as well as overall coverage from a central fixture. A dining room would want light directly over the table area. Some switched outlets are useful in general purpose rooms in case you need floor lamps at some point.  It is not simple to figure out what to do and to balance cost with versatility and function. 

 

Troy, I would go with the remote fans, then all you have to do is wire them to the same switch and control them individually by remote, lights and fans. For the can lights I would split them up in 2 or 3 circuits to control how much light you get where.


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#14 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 14, 2013 - 07:30 AM

Troy, I would go with the remote fans, then all you have to do is wire them to the same switch and control them individually by remote, lights and fans. For the can lights I would split them up in 2 or 3 circuits to control how much light you get where.

Remote control fans are great.  Lowes sells a kit for under 40 bucks(well was 40 when I bought them 5 years ago) to add remote control to any fan.  Works great!  Just make sure you have extra batteries on hand.  I had it installed in my bed room, and I took off the chains because I didn't like them hanging down.  Then I couldn't turn off my light when the battery went dead....and I have a hard time sleeping without the fan blowing..


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