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Pex Piping And Fittings


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#16 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 05:34 PM

I bought my home in 2006 and the plumbing was shot.  I bought a 1/2 inch crimp tool and a 3/4 inch tool for about $100 each.  Pex was cheap but fittings were not as cheap.  Lowes had a selection, Home Depot had a selection, Ace hardware too, but none had everything I needed.  I had to buy water valves in different stores depending on what I needed. Under the sink shut-offs, toilet shut-offs, etc. I was worried about freezing in the crawl space under the bathroom but my understanding is that the pex can ha=ndle freezing bettter than copper or CPVC.  I have had no problems,

They do make cheaper crimp tools now but the crimp rings are different for the new inexpensive tools.I would like one for hard to reach areas. The bigger crimpers, like I bought, need lots of space to open the handles.  They look similar to bolt cutters and the handles have to open wide to start.


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#17 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 06:38 PM

The crimp tools are expensive. Like said, they run between $85.00-$100.00 each. I think I'm going to get the stuff, get all of it run with the necessary fittings, then rent the crimping tools from the local hardware store. Rental for the tools are $10.00 each for the weekend. The only thing wrong with renting the tools and waiting to crimp everything at one time is, you take a big chance on missing some fittings. 

 

I think I'm going to go for it, and start collecting all of the necessary pipe and fittings. If all goes well, I should be able to have everything done in a weekend from what the hardware guy tells me. I told him I'm a Carpenter, not a Plumber, but he assured me that I can handle it, and shouldn't have any issues. I guess we'll see. 

 

 

 

I'm also going to try my hand at electrical work. This old house has knob and tube wiring, and I want it gone!!! I spent the extra money when we bought the house to upgrade the electrical service from a 60 amp service to a 200 amp service, so I guess if I'm going to adventure into being a plumber, I may as well try being an electrician too. Should be a "shocking" good time, but I hope not!



#18 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 07:04 PM

Troy, I have no worries about you being able to handle the plumbing... Most important things: hots on the left, sewage runs downhill, don't bite your fingernails...

Seriously, the tool we used was this one http://www.ebay.com/...p-/390676281348.

It lasted thru the entire job until "no one" dropped it. Cant get anyone to fess up, but the break is impact like.

Boss bought it from our local place, spent like $40 on it. He's taking it back to see if they'll warranty, but the job took two weeks, so it paid for itself... Especially so we didnt have to rush.

Best of all, no leaks.
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#19 Arti ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 07:38 PM

I would have to look I believe our local code is you need 18 inches of copper of iron out of the water heater. Also a good cutter to get square cuts on the tubing is almost a must.

I have used both the copper rings and the Stainless Steel, Personally prefer the Stainless ones. The tools are different so you need to make that decision ahead of time.

There are brochures at most local big box stores to guide you along with the project, It is only a few pages long and certainly worth reading.

Good luck with the project, I'm sure you will be pleased when it it is finished.
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#20 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 08:33 PM

Some PEX type tubing has had problems recently. Read this to see what's up. http://kitecsettlement.com/index.cfm

Kitec is the brand in question. We have it at the church of course. Along with the defective BP shingles that have turned to dust in 10 years and are costing us 35,000 to replace. You need to be very careful when picking materials these days. There is a lot of garbage out there. 

  I've had the coil type PEX in my house for 17 years and not one leak. It is put together with the barbed fittings and an expander tool. You expand the end of the pipe and put the fitting in the end. It shrinks back down to it's original size and seems to be a very reliable connection. We have had many leaks and failures in the Church I go to which was built in 2002 and used the straight pipe and the crimp fittings. There was an issue with corrosion of the fittings but that may be solved in current installations. The big advantage of using the coiled pipe is that you can go from source to fixture without any fittings in between. This means faster installs, less potential for leaks and more flow because there is less restriction in the pipes. If you are retrofitting pipe into walls the coil pipe can sometimes be fished through places that would require tearing apart walls for straight pipe in order to put in elbows etc. 


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#21 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 12:18 AM

Lots of great advise for you here Troy!

 

I was glad to see the Shark Bite style fittings finally make it into the main stream. We have been using these for years in the Industrial Plants I have worked at. And we used them on everything form Air lines,water lines and even oil cooling lines on machines. And In all the years I used them I never had one come apart.


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#22 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 07:34 AM

I'm planning on going today to start investing in the tubing and fittings. Maybe I can even start installing today!



#23 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 07:36 AM

Lots of great advise for you here Troy!

 

I was glad to see the Shark Bite style fittings finally make it into the main stream. We have been using these for years in the Industrial Plants I have worked at. And we used them on everything form Air lines,water lines and even oil cooling lines on machines. And In all the years I used them I never had one come apart.

 

So darn easy to use too, and if you make a mistake, you can use a simple tool to release them.....much like car AC fitting release tools.  Mine are holding strong at least 5 years now, 2 being onto 1/2" copper.

 Troy, it's likely you can run all your new lines beside the old so once you are finished & double check everything, you can simply connect all the ends at one time & have almost no down time as far as water service.


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#24 dropped82 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 08:34 AM

I replumbed my entire house with PEX back when I did my bathroom remodel. Great stuff! I used brass fitting with copper crimp rings. The crimping tool was about $90. The tubing is inexpensive. What adds up is the fittings. For all my fixtures I ran the pex to a 90 degree with a NPT going out. That was you still have the rigid mount. Just screw some galvanized nipples protruding though the wall. Worked real well. Took me about 10 hours and $500 to do an entire 2 full bath 2000 SF house. It can expand quite a bit. I haven't tried but have been told it can be directly buried also. Though about adding water to my detached garage.

Eric

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#25 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 09:45 AM

Yes, it can be buried, or at least the LP gas version can.  Had that going about 150' from our grain bin LP tank to the milk parlor furnace.  I believe it is orange in color.


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#26 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 01:13 PM

I prefer copper. I don't know why. Guess I'm old school with it.

I wonder how this new stuff will look 50 years from now.

We redid my dads house 20 years ago with copper and it all looks brand new yet.
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#27 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 01:26 PM

I prefer copper. I don't know why. Guess I'm old school with it.
I wonder how this new stuff will look 50 years from now.
We redid my dads house 20 years ago with copper and it all looks brand new yet.

My house was redone in the late 70's. lost every bit of copper to corrosion around 2000. Little pin holes everywhere.

I went cPVC, but I would do pex now.
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#28 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 02:07 PM

My hose was redone in the late 70's. lost every bit of it to corrosion. Little pin holes everywhere.

I went cPVC, but I would do pex now.

 

Yes, pex stands up the shutoff "shock" where PVC can fail, but if you have a risers installed, it helps absorb shock load.  I know PVC glue isn't nearly as good as it used to be either.  EPA protecting us at it's best!  


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#29 NJKen OFFLINE  

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Posted October 13, 2013 - 03:38 PM

My house was redone in the late 70's. lost every bit of copper to corrosion around 2000. Little pin holes everywhere.

I went cPVC, but I would do pex now.


Common problem with well water with PH problems. Very very common in south jersey. All the copper in my house is dark purple caused by the previous owner not having a water conditioner.

If and when it's time to re plumb my house it's going to be Pex without a doubt.
Unless something "new & improved" comes out.

Wonder if pex would stand up to the ethanol gas ? Lol Pex fuel lines ?
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#30 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 16, 2013 - 06:25 PM

Well, here are some progress pictures:

 

 

Miscellaneous 8 042.JPG Miscellaneous 8 043.JPG

 

 

Now onto the wiring and electrical's!  :thumbs:






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