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Pex Piping And Fittings


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#1 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 01:09 PM

Who has it, who uses it, and are you happy with it? I am going to run new plumbing throughout the house to replace all of the galvanized, black pipe, and copper pipes that are in place now. People are telling me that this Pex piping is the way to go, but I'm a little nervous about crimp type collar fittings. One thing I like so far is it is much cheaper than copper, and seems to be a whole lot faster to install.

 

Let me know some feedback before I start spending the money, or possibly heading down the wrong path. I appreciate the help and input.  :thumbs:

 

Troy


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#2 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 01:19 PM

I have installed some in my house, and any more repairs will simply be tearing out copper or steel & go all PEX.   Also, if you need to keep some copper in places, you can get the instant slide in "grabber" fittings, and slide it right onto copper, and on the other side go with PEX.....no clamps required.  These type fittings cost more, but in these cases it's well worth it.  I did that when I replaced all my back bathroom pipes 5 years or so ago, and no leaks period.  It was copper under the old original house, and I changed to PEX at the addition side.


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#3 NJKen OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 01:40 PM

I'm working on a commercial job rite now (break time) and the plumber loves this stuff. He uses tube type pex, not the coils of Pex. Do yourself a favor, if you do go with pex use the tube, the coiled stuff is harder to work with and it's also hard to make a neat looking job.

He uses crimp fittings and hasn't had any problems with them.
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#4 jd.rasentrac ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 02:17 PM

it's standard here, we used it when my younger son build his home, too. With your skills - no prob, Troy.


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#5 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 02:30 PM

Couple of guys at work have used it on rehabs, works great just make sure you have good, correct crimping equipment!!  They both ended up buying their own stuff to do it.


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#6 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 02:35 PM

Buy a tool and the stainless steel crimp fittings, avoid the grabber type where you can use a crimp. Don't pull real right as it expands and contracts more than copper, leave a little play. Where possible You can avoid elbows by making a wide radius bend. I ran main Hot and cold trunks in the crawl space and feed lines up from there. My two tub faucets have no connections in the wall except right at the faucet, brought a pipe up over one joist space each side and curved to the faucet. Plumbing inspector was impressed.
You won't be disappointed Troy. Happy to address any specific questions, I use it all the time.
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#7 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 02:36 PM

Good stuff. I had a section of PEX freeze in in the back bathroom. :wallbanging:  thawed it with a hairdryer (not to close) Never leaked! If this would have been metal or copper there would have been water everywhere.


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#8 Michiganmobileman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 02:43 PM

Good stuff. I had a section of PEX freeze in in the back bathroom. :wallbanging: thawed it with a hairdryer (not to close) Never leaked! If this would have been metal or copper there would have been water everywhere.

Good point that I forgot to mention. We had a piece of 3/4 about 18 inches long, filled with water and plugged both ends. This sat in the freezer at the old office and you could take it out, bend it and hear the ice break but the tubing was not damaged. Not an excuse to let it freeze, but sure recovers well if it does.
Edit
Darn phones typos

Edited by Michiganmobileman, October 12, 2013 - 02:45 PM.

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#9 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 03:09 PM

Well you guys sold me on using it. The local hardware store has both, the rolls and the tubing, but the tubing only comes in 12' lengths. I think I'm going to go with the roll, as it comes in a 100' roll. For 100' of 3/4" blue, its $49.98, a 100' of 1/2" red is $29.98, and a 100' roll of 1/2" white is $29.98. I think I'll use the 3/4" blue as my main trunk line feed, and splice off of it with the 1/2" white for all of my cold water feeds. The 3/4" blue will run into the new furnace, and then I'll use 1/2" red coming out of the furnace to feed the hot lines throughout the house. 

 

I see there are options for black plastic fittings, white plastic fittings, and brass fittings. What are the recommendations for these? I'm thinking of just going with the white plastic fittings, but if one of the other options is more beneficial, please let me know. Doesn't seem to be a price difference between the white and black plastic fittings, but the brass ones of course, are a little more. I have also found two types of ring collars. Some are black, and some of brass. Any recommendations there?

 

I appreciate all of the help guys. My wife said to just google my questions, but what fun is that?



#10 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 03:35 PM

Troy, sorry late to the party.

We did a major refit at the store and I agree, once you get used to it... It's better than PVC.

We used rolls, it was ok that you have to straighten it some.
The stainless crimp is the best, the shark bite style is nice as a backup like Daniel said. As for my vote on the fittings, I would say the brass ones are better. But that's kind of based on 3rd party opinion. Plumber told me the plastic fittings can get brittle and break later.
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#11 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 03:41 PM

Yes, I'd go brass myself Alan.  Just in my case I was just doing a small job, extending lines some 10' or so.  That's why I went with the "shark bite" so I could simply tie onto the copper under the main part of the house.  I only needed a hand full of fittings, so rather than buy the crimp tool, I used the shark bite type.  


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#12 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 03:57 PM

It is amazing how the sharkbite can work with all types of pipe. In the new construction, I see mostly the white plastic fittings used. But then  the installer isn't really planning to be fixing it himself years down the road.


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#13 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 04:00 PM

I've used it on a number of occasions.  I would use the brass fittings, the plastic ones DO get brittle over time.  Can't really comment on the stainless rings, I bought the crimping tool and have only used that to "squish" the copper rings into place.  Personally, I would ALWAYS use an elbow fitting to get around a bend, I have seen a few stress cracks from those 90 degree bends.  

The "Sharkbite" fittings work great at joining copper to PEX to QUEST and are available as threaded adapters to join threaded pipe as well.


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#14 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 04:50 PM

Boy did I learn a whole lot today, I want to thank everyone that placed a post here about the PEX pipe which I had never heard of--Thank you to everyone. I had seen the different color pipes on some construction jobs and that was ti, but had no idea what it was and my thinking was the color red was for the hot and the blue for the cold with any further information.

 

 

Dick


Edited by JRJ, October 12, 2013 - 04:53 PM.

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#15 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted October 12, 2013 - 05:15 PM

My house has all black fittings and all black pipe.

 

 

Another way to look at the use of PEX pipe? It is the top choice when putting in heated floors. If it gets poured into solid concrete slabs without leaking, behind a wall isn't an issue.

 

My neighbor had a pole shed erected this summer, 36x48. Poured slab floor, 6 zone PEX heating. I've torn up floors with copper piping in or under them, but I have never seen one installed with anything other than PEX.

 

Isn't the crimping tool the most expensive part of doing it?


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