Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Straw bales and cordwood


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 dryrun OFFLINE  

dryrun

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 1559
  • 56 Thanks
  • 342 posts
  • Location: 6 miles northwest of ENGLISH, INDIANA

Posted December 09, 2010 - 03:47 PM

Has anybody ever built a cabin using either straw bales, or stacked cord wood. I am wanting to build a cabin for me and the MemSahib. Read that as; as cheap as possible, but with real good insulating properties. I have metal for roof, and posts etc to frame with, but am trying to decide if I am going to use conventional walls or try something different. Any opinions, ideas?

regards George

#2 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,334 Thanks
  • 28,642 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted December 09, 2010 - 05:27 PM

You're not going to like the straw idea if it's use is going to be more than 1 year... ground moisture, bees, etc.

As for the cordwood, there are 100 yr old barns out there with a cement base & stacked wood/mud/cement walls.
Stovewood Barns - Michigan History - January February 1990
IDT you'll save much over t-111 or Treated plywood.

My dad has an old Chicken Coop that is 30 year old barn-painted chipboard. Just this year the wood went. If We'd kept up with the paint, it'd been good for longer. It is up a foot in the air on posts with a floor of 2" pine treated with used oil.
  • caseguy said thank you

#3 olcowhand ONLINE  

olcowhand

    Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Sponsor
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 20
  • 35,653 Thanks
  • 29,841 posts
  • Location: South Central Kentucky

Posted December 09, 2010 - 06:33 PM

Attached File  Cordwood Building.pdf   953.85KB   40 downloadsIf the attachment came through, it's a pdf on building with cordwood. He used LOTS of mortar, but you could use far less with tighter wood. Looks very interesting too! With good hardwood & preservative applied yearly, I think it would last indefinitely.

#4 olcowhand ONLINE  

olcowhand

    Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Sponsor
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 20
  • 35,653 Thanks
  • 29,841 posts
  • Location: South Central Kentucky

Posted December 09, 2010 - 06:35 PM

Go here for more pdf's on the subject.
http://www.daycreek....l/cordicles.htm

#5 coldone OFFLINE  

coldone

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 839
  • 1,631 Thanks
  • 1,668 posts
  • Location: Central NC

Posted December 09, 2010 - 08:32 PM

I have seen a few articles on both, mast were associated with living off the grid. I just dont see alot of people building them, even in the web articles. Usually there is some draw back associated when a method does not take off with that crowd.

Just my $0.00002 pesos

#6 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

Reverend Blair

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 1659
  • 501 Thanks
  • 952 posts
  • Location: Winnipeg

Posted December 10, 2010 - 05:05 AM

Straw bale houses are still fairly popular in some places. I've watched some how-to's on them on television and they seem okay. The inside and outside are parged (concrete on the outside, plaster on the inside) and you can place bucks in wall openings to accept conventional doors and windows. They look like a lot more work than a conventional wood-framed building though.




Top