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Looking for an opinion / JB Weld repair


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16 replies to this topic

#1 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 03:22 PM

Hey guys, what do you all think about this... I have a K301 motor that had water in the oil pan when I got it. The motor itself is fine, but when I cleaned the oil pan, I found that it was cracked. Now it's he deep sump style pan, and it is cracked around the sump and not the mounting flange. I was thinking that if I "V" out the cracks and seal it with JB weld, it may hold. I used it on the side of a Briggs block with a hole through the side, but never one where it has to hold back the oil in a pan.

It's cast iron and could be welded, but for about $50 or under, I could buy a replacement. However, I have not seen it run yet....

#2 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 03:46 PM

The J.B. should work fine. The 'V' is a good idea, but don't "V" it out nearly as much as if you were going to weld it.

#3 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 04:13 PM

Yes, only a slight "V". But most important to get all the oil off for a good bond. Heating good & hot is the only way to get the oil out of cast iron, as it is porous to some extent. Not cherry red, but just till you don't see any oil sweating out. A small propane torch will do fine.
I weld any cracks with nickel rod, then coat over the weld with JB, just in case there are any "cold-cracks" that form. Gotta get the oil out for welding also. Man, $50 to weld that.....I wish I were closer to ya!

Edited by olcowhand, December 08, 2010 - 04:23 PM.


#4 adamsrj OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 04:18 PM

if you do the proper prep it works great. my silverado with a 4.8 has jb sealing a crack in the oil pan. (came that way from the previous owner) so far no problems at all

#5 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 04:28 PM

OCH: The $50 or under is what seems to be a going rate for a used oil pan for the K301 on e-bay. However, I need to tear it down all the way to put a new lifter in it, new gaskets and a used carb. Another $50 I would rather not spend! This is the motor out of the JD 112 that I brought home last spring.

#6 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 04:30 PM

I repaired a cracked water jacket on the engine in my Case SC with JB weld and it has held up just fine. There were actually 2 cracks parallel to each other. I had a friend of mine weld the bottom one with some (very expensive) nickel rod. I did the top one with a bead of the stiffer JB epoxy (quicksteel maybe?) and the coated the whole thing with another layer of regular JB weld so I could feather it. The JB held up just as good as the welds did.

#7 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 05:12 PM

Thanks guys... I think I am going to give it a try. I don't have that much to loose, just the JB weld. The area is not one that is best welded due to the shape and where it has to fit into the frame.

The Briggs motor I did was on my Troy-Bilt tiller about 2 years ago when the rod broke and went through the side of the block. That was patched with a soda can to fill the hole and JB Weld on both sides. The rod and piston was swapped in from a non-I/C version Briggs and the bore honed in house. It has held up perfect for two years so far, but like I said, it was on the side of the block and not holding oil in a sump type design.

#8 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 05:29 PM

We used to race go-karts with Briggs 5hp engines, I used JB weld all the time to repair blocks that had rods show themselves out the side. I never had a block patch fail. On cast iron I always put a magnet on the crack and take some dust from my bench grinder, always a pile of the stuff under it, and spread the dust over the crack. I can usually see the ends of the crack this way, I mark each end with a center punch and then drill a 1/8" hole at each end of the crack to make sure the crack doesn't grow longer. I also use carb. or brake cleaner on the crack and then put some heat on it to make sure its clean.

Hope this helps, Brian

#9 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 05:46 PM

...I mark each end with a center punch and then drill a 1/8" hole at each end of the crack to make sure the crack doesn't grow longer.


I forgot to mention that in my post. I also drilled the ends of the crack before I cut the "V groove in. Thanks for the reminder!

I also use carb. or brake cleaner on the crack and then put some heat on it to make sure its clean. Hope this helps, Brian

Just be careful which brake cleaner you choose before you heat it as some are extremely flammable! Discovered that by accident so I did!

#10 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2010 - 07:21 PM

Just be careful which brake cleaner you choose before you heat it as some are extremely flammable! Discovered that by accident so I did!


Livin on the edge!

#11 mikebramel OFFLINE  

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Posted December 09, 2010 - 12:55 PM

used that for a briggs twin oil pan that had water in it
used some brake cleaner or degreaser, straight, dwell for 5 min scrub with a brush, repeat a couple times, rinse it
baked it in an oven for 250 or something like that to outgas it and then wash it again
seems to work fine

#12 dryrun OFFLINE  

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Posted December 09, 2010 - 04:21 PM

First, EMT, thanks for your service to the community,I was a fireman for 15 years.

I have used JB for several years, and I think it will work just fine. Just follow the suggestions from the guys on cleanliness, and baking out any solvents or oil.

One thing I would like to add is do not discount or forget brazing. Brazing seems to have gone out of style in the last few years. Brazing is easy to learn, does not require a lot of expense, and is readily usable by the small time user. I have brazed with an acytelene only torch, like heat and air people use, and thin materials with a MAPP gas torch. A good braze job at a welding shop should not be very expensive.


regards GEORGE

#13 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted December 09, 2010 - 09:58 PM

I had thought about that, but there is a lot of "chance" due to the design. Warping is a big deal because it may not seal, or worse yet, it could damage the motor if forced to straighten when bolted down.

I have not brazed in years, but was taught in all aspects in voc school. We had gas welding as part of our welding cert. We had to braze and fuse metal without rod, but just melting the metal. One day I will buy a set of torches because I could REALLY use them in the shop! Even a tiny set with small tanks would be enough for me to work with at home.

Oh, and just to mention because it does come up every now and then... I too "retired" from the fire service about 7 years ago now. I put in 11 years in the Fire / Rescue / EMS service. When we moved to Connecticut I hung up my helmet and called it a day. I have used the screen name for so long I just can't give it up now. Want a laugh? Try a google search of it and you will find me all over the place! (I just found 10, 500 hits myself... good grief!)

#14 WQDL753 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 10, 2010 - 01:50 AM

I used JB when I was a kid, It did ok for it's purpose. consider it an emergancy repair. I agree with george, braze or solder it if you don't wan't to go the welding route. And I don't blame you for that, welding cast iron properly is involved, it takes more than just having a nickel rod. The heat involved in brazing or soldering though is not going to have any ill effects on cast iron. There is a reason cast is still used today for even the most precision machines, it's stabil, it don't creep, it don't warp, it stays in place or it breaks.
Regardless of your decision though, all of your options need proper prep and cleaning. As my dad told me "If it's a 10 min. job, then 9 min. of that is cleaning and prep".

#15 tyler OFFLINE  

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Posted December 10, 2010 - 06:07 AM

i had a oil pan with cracks, from other people tighting the oil plug to tight. i sprayed the outside of the pan with box liner paint. looks good and no leaks




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