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Does Anyone Raise Worms For Composting Or Fishing ?


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#1 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 05:58 AM

I've noticed I don't have that many worms in my garden nor compost pile . Yesterday I was looking for some for my wife because she likes fishing at my son's pond . I only found 2 and my wife found 4 . She said it was because she was pushing the pitch-fork deeper  I almost said it was " because you weight more then me "  but as my life flashed before my eye thought better lol . Anyway I was thinking it would be nice to have a spot or container with then growing  (?)   Lots of info on the net but trust your opinions


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#2 jd.rasentrac OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 06:51 AM

 

I almost said it was " because you weight more then me "

 

Oh, that's dangerous, Al. At least for me. Worm harvest in germany is good!



#3 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 07:18 AM

We have a 'Worm Farm' about a mile from our house!  It's right down the street from a large dairy farm so the worms get a hearty feast of cow manure and silage to munch on..  The resulting 'stuff' from the worms is harvested and sold..  It's been a great business for the guy who thunk it up and they've been expanding it ever since!  http://www.wormpower.net/


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#4 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 07:34 AM

When the soil is dry the worms seem to disappear. Good Luck, Rick


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#5 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 08:10 AM

A good friend of mine lived near a lake. He sunk several cast iron bath tubs in the ground & raised worms. This was a very good supplement to his retirement.
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#6 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 08:49 AM

I got a nice early morning chuckle.  Thanks

 

Let us know what you find.  That is interesting.



#7 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 09:05 AM

When I was a young boy, my Dad and Mom raised night crawlers in an old cast iron bath tub filled with peat moss if I remember correctly. We always took several dozen out of the tub to go up into NE Minnesota fishing a couple times each year.

 

Al, I'm glad you thought thru your rebuttal to your wife before just letting it fly out of your mouth. :thumbs:  You might have become the next item added to the compost pile!! :rolling:


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#8 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 09:23 AM

My dad use to go hunting for them, after dark a couple hours. He would take a flashlight with older batteries so light was dim and them catch them. Once he caught them, he put them in a bucket or plastic tub with peat moss/dirt, covered with a burlap sack. He would throw an old tater in there once in a while and keep top damp. Whenever he wanted to fishing, just rustle up the dirt and get him a few.

 

If you want to get soem to come around, make you a mulch pile using some old animal droppings, rabbit is realtively low odor and keep it somewhat covered ( old plywood, etc) and damp. They will come around.


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#9 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 10:42 AM

  Looks like shade and moist soil , I'll have to get some animal poo , large tub or rubbermaid container and burry it .Do worms last through the winter ? My compost is mosty grass clippings and weeds so when it dry it's almost like peat moss so I should be able to use that in with it . I do have the fish poo and allgie when I clean the pond filter mesh , would that be good ?


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#10 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 10:49 AM

Al, Dad kept ours on the enclosed back porch, but it wasn't heated so I don't really know how cold it got out there in the winter in Central Indiana. He also had an old wooden screen door he kept over it to make sure non of the Crawlers didn't get out, :D


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#11 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 10:49 AM

The worms seem to go deep for the winter. I have fairly large wood chip and leaf piles. I get horse manure periodically. They all seem to encourage the worms. Two things I hate to see when I till the garden are rocks and that I've cut worms. Good Luck, Rick


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#12 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 01:30 PM

I thought I posted this. I guess not.

 

Did anyone ever use a worm shocker? You take a steel rod with a wood handle. I've even used a garden fork. Take an extension cord and cut the female end off. Cut the black wire flush and clamp the white wire to the rod. Stick it in the ground and plug it in. The worms will come boiling out of the ground.


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#13 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 10:25 PM

I use red worms for the compost bin, never can nurse them through a winter inside a 3x3 box, though.
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#14 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 03, 2013 - 05:34 AM

If they wouldn't surrive the winter outside I could use a plastic bin with a tray under it in the garage , it gets cold but hasn't been below freezing  in there in a few years . Also could put the mats I use to start my seedlings if it gets really cold . I don't know how much longer people fish for catfish . Do they stop bitting when the water gets cold ?  Either way I'm going to start looking for a bin and a spot for it near my garden ,



#15 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted October 03, 2013 - 06:39 AM

How about the bottom drawer of your kitchen fridge? No???






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