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Differences In Os Software To A Ms User.


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#1 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 12:55 PM

Guys, How much difference is there between the different OS that are available? If I am used to only running MS, how hard would it be to use one of the others?



#2 dogsoldier OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 05:08 PM

from what i have used there is a small learning curve. 

i started with a old 386 and moved to windows 3.1 and stopped using windows with xp. 

from xp i moved to Ubuntu 5.? and never looked back. there isnt much i cant do that a windows user can do. 

almost every app for Linux is free unlike windows.

what you can do is download the ISO for the distro you want to try and burn it to cd-dvd or thumb drive and try it that way. 

doing a live verison does nothing to your current setup on your system.


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#3 SupplySergeant OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 05:33 PM

Guys, How much difference is there between the different OS that are available? If I am used to only running MS, how hard would it be to use one of the others?

 Brian, it's about like the difference between a JD and a WheelHorse. It all does the same thing, in a similar way, just slightly different ways to get there. With Linux, if you don't like the way one desktop works, just install a different user interface and try it. Like Dogsoldier mentioned, most distributions of Linux can be downloaded in a "LiveCD" variant, that will boot from CD and let you try it before you actually install it. I'm writing this on an old, circa 2005 laptop, running LUbuntu 13.04. It's a really lightweight distro, runs really well on older, slower systems.


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#4 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 06:23 PM

If you want to give any of the linux versions a test drive, a thumb drive and unetbootin will give you a quick easy way.

 

Just google unetbootin and follow the instructions. It will take you longer to figure out how to make a live thumbdrive than it will to reboot the computer and use the live drive.

 

 

ETA: here is a quick tutorial on unetbootin


Edited by coldone, September 30, 2013 - 06:27 PM.

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#5 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 06:30 PM

Guys, How much difference is there between the different OS that are available? If I am used to only running MS, how hard would it be to use one of the others?

 Brian as DS and Sarge said there is a few differences, mainly how the OS operates.  For one unlike windows you don't run as an administrator, what that means is that if any one or program try's to install something on your computer it has to have permission to do so which requires what we call the root (administrator) password.  It also keeps the OS away from your files and you can not do any thing to any of the OS files with out the root password. So it gives you an extra layer of security plus the segregation of the files means that it is difficult to accidentally delete an important file.

 

As DS and Sarge pointed out you can run just about any Linux Distro from a live CD or USB drive and it won't hurt anything on your computer.There are several of the distros the mimic the Windows interface so you will feel right at home.  Also keep in mind if you do decide to try a distro you can install it along side windows creating a dual boot machine so at boot time you can decide which OS you want to boot to. 

 

Another big advantage is when you install a Linux distro most of them have already installed all the applications most users will want like a web browser, Office application, Photo software, Multimedia software, music software, Editor's, Everything you normally have to buy for a windows machine.  Plus The software center I talk about in the main post will download and install for you ton's of other software so if you don't like the default applications then there is usually 3 or 4 others you can install.  All for Free!

 

Brian if you are interested PM me your address and I will send you a disc to try and directions on what you have to do to get the disc up and running.


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#6 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 09:24 PM

Thanks Everyone, I am going try out some of these. I'm tired of MS dropping support on their older OS and really tired of paying the big bucks for all the Add On Programs. :thumbs:


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#7 SupplySergeant OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 09:43 PM

You are heading down a road that can be as addictive as GT's! Seriously, though, I run my router, two laptops and my personal desktop on Linux, and when I get time and money to build a CNC milling machine, it will run Linux too. There are occasional frustrations, like anything, but the Linux community is much like this one. Very supportive, very helpful. Enjoy!


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#8 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 09:44 PM

Brian, I used Mint for a while and liked it, but my printers were not supported.

 

Might do a little lookin around on what peripherals would need replaced.  IMHO it would be worth replacing the printer to have linux (non M$) but She has spoken. 


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#9 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 10:18 PM

Thanks Everyone, I am going try out some of these. I'm tired of MS dropping support on their older OS and really tired of paying the big bucks for all the Add On Programs. :thumbs:

 

 All software (that I know of) has an end of life date. The resourced required to maintain the code for old versions are astronomical so most software organizations set a period as to how long the will maintain a certain version.  That being said Linux does the same thing so a couple of term you need to know about are; STS (Short term support), LTS (Long term support and rolling release.  The STS & LTS are distro's that will be maintained with security updates for a specified period of time.  STS is usually about a year depending on that distro's release cycle.  The LTS is usually for a couple of years. A distro built off of Ubuntu 13.04 is only supported for 9 months. A distro built off Ubuntu 12.04 or 12.04.03 will be supported until April 2017. A rolling release never has an end of life date because it is always updating it's self to the latest release.  This is a fairly new updating system so expect hickups with it.  Mint has a verson called Linux Mint Debian (LMDE) which is a rolling release.

 

 

Brian, I used Mint for a while and liked it, but my printers were not supported.

 

Might do a little lookin around on what peripherals would need replaced.  IMHO it would be worth replacing the printer to have linux (non M$) but She has spoken. 

 

If you use an HP printer then the chances are good that it will be supported.  HP supports open source quite well.  If you have another brand printer be sure to check the distro's supported hardware.

 

I know this all may sound confusing but it really isn't once you understand how software works.  If you have questions feel free to ask us or on the distro's forum.


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#10 SupplySergeant OFFLINE  

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Posted September 30, 2013 - 10:28 PM

 All software (that I know of) has an end of life date. The resourced required to maintain the code for old versions are astronomical so most software organizations set a period as to how long the will maintain a certain version.  That being said Linux does the same thing so a couple of term you need to know about are; STS (Short term support), LTS (Long term support and rolling release.  The STS & LTS are distro's that will be maintained with security updates for a specified period of time.  STS is usually about a year depending on that distro's release cycle.  The LTS is usually for a couple of years. A distro built off of Ubuntu 13.04 is only supported for 9 months. A distro built off Ubuntu 12.04 or 12.04.03 will be supported until April 2017. A rolling release never has an end of life date because it is always updating it's self to the latest release.  This is a fairly new updating system so expect hickups with it.  Mint has a verson called Linux Mint Debian (LMDE) which is a rolling release.

 

 

 

If you use an HP printer then the chances are good that it will be supported.  HP supports open source quite well.  If you have another brand printer be sure to check the distro's supported hardware.

 

I know this all may sound confusing but it really isn't once you understand how software works.  If you have questions feel free to ask us or on the distro's forum.

Great advice, Bill. I've found that Brother generally releases Linux drivers as well, although they end to be really big compared to other Linux drivers.


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#11 Trav1s OFFLINE  

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Posted October 10, 2013 - 03:36 PM

 LinuxMint shares the same repositories as Ubuntu so if a printer is supported in Ubuntu it should be supported in Mint.  I think Mint is a bit easier to switch to from windows than the current Ubuntu releases (12.04, 12.10, 13.04) due to the GUI.  I would suggest Ubuntu 12.04 LTS or LinuxMint 13 "Maya" LTS.  

I would suggest installing Ubuntu/Mint on a USB drive (2 works fine and 4 gb works great) and boot from there.  

Follow this guide to set up the USB drive: http://www.ubuntu.co...tick-on-windows

It has all the benefits of a "live" CD and it allows you to save preferences (bookmarks, files, etc).  

 

A MAJOR difference between 32bit and 64bit versions of the same software is the amount of RAM that can be accessed by the OS.  A 32bit OS can only access up to 3.5Gb of RAM.  Any additional ram installed goes unused.  If your computer has 4GB or more of RAM you need a 64bit OS to access the full 4GB (or more).  http://www.ehow.com/...s_-64-bit.html 


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