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Built My First Fire In The Wood Burner Tonight.


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#1 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2013 - 07:46 PM

You checked out my other thread with my home remodel you know I only have lived in my home for 4 months.

It only warmed up to 50 today so I figured id try out my wood burner after resealing it and new gaskets.

went from 65 in the house to 78 in like 25 minutes. Little warm.

but I know now it works great, consumed about 10 16" long logs in 12 hours. Not bad at all in my mind. I have the damper about shut, and it just has a nice slow burn
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#2 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted September 22, 2013 - 10:49 PM

Nothing like "real heat" that only a wood fire can give. Ours has been going for a week or more, every morning just to take the nights' chill off.


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#3 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 07:24 AM

My house is passive solar with wood backup. I don't usually have to fire up the woodstove until late November. But, I let the house go down to 63 degrees before I'll fire up the stove. The wood has two advantages: a cord of hardwoood can give heat equivallent to 200 gallons of oil and it will keep the house warm even in a storm with the power out.

 

You will be very glad that you have that woodstove. Good Luck, Rick


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#4 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 09:00 AM

Not too bad on the wood comsumption. once you burn it for a bit, you will learn the best way to manage it to keep it hot enough, but not waste wood. My dad could load theirs, then he would "bank" it with some ash, still had hot coals the next morning.

 

I need to take apart my mom's woodburner add on and make sure it's all sealed up and get it ready for her. She's by herself and the furnace eats up the oil.

I loved when I was kid getting out of bed then running down stairs and standing on the large floor grates with that wood heat. It would almost burn your feet, but kept that house sooooo warm, nothing like it!


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#5 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 09:20 AM

We used coal and wood when I was younger, probably till 5 or 6, then we moved and have used heating oil since.

 

I noticed yesterday that even though the fire was pretty much out when I went down and threw more wood in, I was able to very easily start a fire by opening the damper a bit and kicking the ash door open about an inch, within 3 seconds I had a good sized fire going.  But more over, though the coals were just smoldering, and a few small small pieces burning, I was still getting a good bit of heat out of the vents. 

 

Got up this morning, 41 outside, still 70 inside, and there was a bit of coals in the bottom.  Didn't attempt to relite as everyone was heading to work, and school.  So No reason to waste wood, going to be mid 60s today.  So figured no reason to waste wood at this point. 

 

This furnance has no blower, it radiates up into a collection box above the furnance then just physics carry it through 2 vents that actually put out heat.  One in the front of the house, one in the rear.  It works great!  I might add a 3rd vent in the bathroom.  The house was very warm in the 2 room with the vents.  In between in the kitchen, the bedroom was cool(which is great, I can't sleep hot) and the laundry room was very warm.  Its not real uniform, but not bad.

 

I'm excited about this wood burning.  I have enjoyed splitting wood(great exercise and anger relief) and heating with wood just seems manly. 


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#6 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 10:20 AM

My parents had oil furnace with blower, then dad put wood burner add on on teh back side of hte chimeny where an old coal furnace used to be and plumbed it into the main duct work. As long as it was burning, oil never kicked on. The wood burner came with 2 very small squirrel fans, he yanked them, cut the whole out bigger and added a larger furnace fan, man it will heat the house in a second.

Too bad you weren't closer, I have 2-3 extra big furnace fans I would five you, but sounds like your radiant is working pretty well as is.


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#7 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 10:28 AM

You'd be surprised what a small fan hanging in a doorway will do to move heat from the warmer rooms. Makes a big difference in the whole house. Best place in the world to take nap is next to the wood stove on a cold day.  :thumbs:


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#8 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 10:54 AM

The drier you keep the wood the better off you will be. Watch out for creosote. One caution: only put the ashes in a steel container. There are embers hidden in the ashes that can hold out for a week. A guy at the other end of the state caused a fatal fire because he put the ashes in a cardboard box and placed it on the back porch. the house was being renovated and three children and to grandparents perished. I use my ashes to sweeten the soil of my lawn. It is noticably healthier where it spread the ashes. We all want healthier lawns so that we can mow more. Good Luck, Rick


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#9 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 02:06 PM

The drier you keep the wood the better off you will be. Watch out for creosote. One caution: only put the ashes in a steel container. There are embers hidden in the ashes that can hold out for a week. A guy at the other end of the state caused a fatal fire because he put the ashes in a cardboard box and placed it on the back porch. the house was being renovated and three children and to grandparents perished. I use my ashes to sweeten the soil of my lawn. It is noticably healthier where it spread the ashes. We all want healthier lawns so that we can mow more. Good Luck, Rick

 

I have a nice antique ash bucket, made of brass, and a matching shovel.  Pretty sweet looking if I do say so myself.  I like old stuff!


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#10 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 08:49 PM

My parents had oil furnace with blower, then dad put wood burner add on on teh back side of hte chimeny where an old coal furnace used to be and plumbed it into the main duct work. As long as it was burning, oil never kicked on. The wood burner came with 2 very small squirrel fans, he yanked them, cut the whole out bigger and added a larger furnace fan, man it will heat the house in a second.

Too bad you weren't closer, I have 2-3 extra big furnace fans I would five you, but sounds like your radiant is working pretty well as is.

This is the system we use as well--- nothing like standing on the grate with your bare feet when you come in from doing chores on a cold winter morning. The oil furnace is on a thermostat for when we are away for more time than the wood fire can do the job, but it seldom cuts in when we are at home. It is great to see that column of smoke rising straight up from the chimney on a cold winter day and knowing that Olde Deere #2 has a pot of stew shoved back on the top of the wood heater, just bubbling away.  Life is good!


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#11 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 09:29 PM

39 low tonight. Added in another vent tonight in the laundry room, and reworked the vent from the rear room to the kitchen. So laundry room, kitchen and living room. Turned on 2 ceiling fans on reverse. Set up a thermometer in 3 parts of the house. Laundry room stayed 74 kitchen 75 living room 75. Pretty even. May adjust when it gets colder and see what works best.

I think I habe a problem. I always have to tinker and mess with stuff to see if I can make it better in some way.
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#12 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2013 - 10:06 PM

 

 

I think I habe a problem. I always have to tinker and mess with stuff to see if I can make it better in some way.

That's not a problem, it's an asset if used correctly. On top of that it sure makes a guy feel good when he succeeds.  :thumbs:


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#13 HydroHarold OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2013 - 01:01 AM

Re. "Fans".  If it weren't for a 16" fan sitting on top of my refrigerator the den off the kitchen would be 400º and the rest of the house 40º.  Stove is all the way in one end of the house and it's the only way to even out the heat.  The PO used the stove 3 times and gave it up after spending nearly $4600 on the install hearth, pipe and all.  The stove is a small "Avalon" and it keeps the entire 1300sq.ft. house nicely heated.  I can even sit comfortably in the same room with it as the cool air is returning and mixing and I get to watch the flames (or nap). 

 

Every couple of years I watch the store sales for "fans" and go find a model that has the right cu.ft./min. and is QUIET enough to run 24/7 all winter.  So far I haven't needed to spend more than $16 for one that will do the job on "Low".  Summer time they move the A/C in the same manner through the house (sitting on the floor).  This year makes 42 years of near total "renewable resource heating" (I don't count the 2 years using coal, PIA!) and I wouldn't have done it any other way.  I have the "Arab Embargo" of the early '70's to thank for my totally sublime Winter comfort!:D


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#14 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2013 - 07:46 AM

I'll get some pictures of what I am using.

 

Its basically a converted coal stove.  I don't really know if its "converted" but the old man burnt coal in it, then wood later on.  It works great.

 

It basically looks like an over sized 55 gallon drum with a cast iron door for the burn box and a cast iron door for the ash bin.  Then it has 4 holes in the top for the radiant heat to push through the duct work. 

 

I can't find a single thing on the internet about it.  Stamped 21st Century, has some dates and patent numbers on it.  According to the older guys in town all the homes had one of these installed that were build from 1913 to 1930.  They were put in the basement then the house was built over it.  Its so huge you'd never get it in or out of there.

 

http://www.drpower.c...od-splitter.axd

 

Anyone ever tried one of these?


Edited by toomanytoys84, September 24, 2013 - 09:11 AM.

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#15 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted September 24, 2013 - 11:33 AM

My Grandfathers house had something like that in it. Looked like an upside down octopus.






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