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#1 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 01:23 PM

I was thinking about this lately along with reading the post 

http://gardentractor...7877-the-big-5/  I am new to this great hobby & learning a lot fast. I run a daily search of certain GT's I'm interested in on http://www.searchtempest.com/ I'm finding out that certain GT's by brand are more available than others depending on where your looking. I know a lot is due to the town they were built for instance you won't find many Cub's in a town that MF was constructing in years ago. I know a lot of you have mentioned this about certain GT's are found in one area more than another. Is there any info by region where GT's were built without Googeling every manufacture. Some of you may already have a good idea in your own area what is available...just a thought.


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#2 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 01:25 PM

I was thinking about this lately along with reading the post 

http://gardentractor...7877-the-big-5/  I am new to this great hobby & learning a lot fast. I run a daily search of certain GT's I'm interested in on http://www.searchtempest.com/ I'm finding out that certain GT's by brand are more available than others depending on where your looking. I know a lot is due to the town they were built for instance you won't find many Cub's in a town that MF was constructing in years ago. I know a lot of you have mentioned this about certain GT's are found in one area more than another. Is there any info by region where GT's were built without Googeling every manufacture. Some of you may already have a good idea in your own area what is available...just a thought.

If you try ST just type in your own area code & type what your looking for in the other. Disregard my latest search on Bolen's.



#3 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 02:59 PM

I've asked the same thing. It didn't fly.

 

http://gardentractor...25-tractor-map/


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#4 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 03:04 PM

I guess I should have done my homework & checked first. If anyone wants to delete this please do so. 



#5 Sparky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 05:41 PM

A good question actually but a liitlle tricky to get answers for . In many cases it depends on the name applied to it and the dealerships . The farm equipment names went to those dealers for more year round traffic for the dealer . The actual maker would do his own marketing also but  in yoked dealerships mostly with a few exceptions  ( W.H )  . The Elec-Traks were all built in same plant mostly but the red W.H. units were marketed from a different central location . Just a few of the considerations .


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#6 Sparky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 06:54 PM

Manufacture location vs marketing main offices -  those can be tough to correlate . Shipping by rail was largely shut down by the mid 60 ' s for the small  shippers . No E-T 's went by rail . Not known if any GTs, went on the iron horse .


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#7 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 07:17 PM

Wheel Horse is found predominantly in Indiana, Ohio, & Pennsylvania.  Thick as flies there. Others, like Sears and MTD are more national.

 

I've noticed that West Coast GTT members are much scarcer. Why is that? Do they have lawns or are their lawns much, much bigger?

Or is the urge to collect not there? Dunno'.


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#8 AVB OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 07:37 PM

They seem pretty rare in my area too. I guess most people have ag tractors or a lawn tractor around here. I do know where a JD 140 is and one of my old bosses had a old yellow and white Sears.



#9 Sparky OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 07:38 PM

I think mass marketing west of the Mississippi was  limited before 1975 and by that time larger hp was prevalent . Or maybe the large sheep ranches of the Denver area didn't need them .   San Fran is for someone else to opine about .



#10 AVB OFFLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2013 - 07:45 PM

I forgot about the diesel Ariens we had when I was young, it may have been the first tractor I ever mowed with. One of my friends had a GT5000 that his grandpa gave him and his grandpa also had a Husqvarna. I forgot about those two also. At the time I wondered why his Husqvarna had bigger wheels than my YTH2348.


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#11 Sparky OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 08:32 PM

http://www.newspaper...ewspage/574033/        Link to ad in Des Moines Register 28 Feb 1975 for Wheel Horse including the Elec-Trak line of three models recently acquired at time of printing.     All made in Scotia NY but marketing office moved to South Bend.


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#12 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2013 - 10:17 PM

Been trying to figure out how to an answer to these various threads about this subject. Cant find a way to post something that wont upset  part of the membership, so ill just throw out some facts I've uncovered over the last 20 plus yrs of researching them. The old tractor and implement books state, a garden tractor is one that will pull a single plow of 12" or less. It doesn't state whether its to have one or 4 wheels.  A lot of what's out there after 1965 are basically lawn mowers. Sure lots of them plow, but they fail in being able to work a garden after the crop is in and  up, due to low clearances, just being to wide, or too heavy. As time and situations changed, the roles of the GT did also. At one point the roto tiller ate up a lot off GT market space, as people dint have the time or the space to till up half and acre.  Few people in the early parts of 1900's needed a FEL, or even a 3pt hitch.  I believe I counted one time that there were 800 different companies that built a GT of some kind or other. Some of them like the Stockton(a small crawler trac unit made in Calf.) never left there home area. My Mighty Man was built in Tacoma,WA, and didn't sell well east of the mountains. There are several more west coast units that stayed mostly around there home areas. Companies like Planet Jr, sold by mail order all over the world, from the early part of 1900's to at least the 1970's. Now true, there stuff was mostly seeders and cultivators, but they did make tractors in the 30's.  Even as close as I am to South Bend, very few Wheel horses are found here. Galesburg, KS isn't really that far either, but most of the Shaw units here were imported from other states. From MN in the North came the Standard Twins, but most of them went to Pa or NY. A lot of what you find is directly due to what kind of stores you have around you, or if your in a market crop area. As I live in a rural area, there are tons of farm tractor dealerships here, and naturally you can find tons of Cubs, Massey, Deere, AC and MM units around. If you lived in a bigger city your choices were limited to some of the many MTD or Murray models, probably the Bolens, and wheel horses. There were a lot of tractors that came from JC Penny, Brown/Lynch/Scott, Western auto, Gambles, and other hardware type stores. Most were built by who ever they could get the best deal on left over parts with. There are many more examples than I care to write up.

 

Now not to promote Sears, but as a catalog company they were a powerhouse of mass marketing. Under the DB and Roper name they built 10's of thousands of tractors and attachments,(500,000 tractors by 1975) mostly in the same factory from 1933 to 1986. During the 30's to the 60's DB shipped boxcar loads of stuff to Sears branch warehouses all around the county, these warehouses in turn shipped "bundles" out the homeowners via the LCL(less than a carload) system on trains. The railroads ended this in the 60's and things went by truck freight. Sears also printed out many  catalogs for the same year, that were regional. If you lived, say in Texas or NC, your copy didn't have a snowblade or snow blower listed, as they really weren't needed in that area.  Montgomery Wards did some of the same things in there line, but unlike Sears they had Simplicity or Midland built the tractors, where as Sears owned the factories.

 

There is probably enough info out there to write up a book on the subject of Regional GT's and the men that made them. You could even include some info on the many different small gas engines that powered them over the last hundred yrs.


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#13 Sparky OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2013 - 11:26 PM

On a slightly related note to this thread - it has been stated that rail service for smaller shippers  ( less than a unit train by Conrail standards ) was discontinued by mid 60 ' s .  However just as Conrail was being formed , the gov't paid viable railroads to test and operate defunct lines . These lines went into many obsolete factories  . The intent mostly was to allow operations that could be done best by rail .

 

                        Some salvage and some close-down operations at factories occured in this fashion during mid 70's. The end result was mostly a stranded boxcar willie  .  Engineers usually did not complain about running on that rail going to the old factory one last time .


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#14 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2013 - 06:48 AM

Been trying to figure out how to an answer to these various threads about this subject. Cant find a way to post something that wont upset  part of the membership, so ill just throw out some facts I've uncovered over the last 20 plus yrs of researching them. The old tractor and implement books state, a garden tractor is one that will pull a single plow of 12" or less. It doesn't state whether its to have one or 4 wheels.  A lot of what's out there after 1965 are basically lawn mowers. Sure lots of them plow, but they fail in being able to work a garden after the crop is in and  up, due to low clearances, just being to wide, or too heavy. As time and situations changed, the roles of the GT did also. At one point the roto tiller ate up a lot off GT market space, as people dint have the time or the space to till up half and acre.  Few people in the early parts of 1900's needed a FEL, or even a 3pt hitch.  I believe I counted one time that there were 800 different companies that built a GT of some kind or other. Some of them like the Stockton(a small crawler trac unit made in Calf.) never left there home area. My Mighty Man was built in Tacoma,WA, and didn't sell well east of the mountains. There are several more west coast units that stayed mostly around there home areas. Companies like Planet Jr, sold by mail order all over the world, from the early part of 1900's to at least the 1970's. Now true, there stuff was mostly seeders and cultivators, but they did make tractors in the 30's.  Even as close as I am to South Bend, very few Wheel horses are found here. Galesburg, KS isn't really that far either, but most of the Shaw units here were imported from other states. From MN in the North came the Standard Twins, but most of them went to Pa or NY. A lot of what you find is directly due to what kind of stores you have around you, or if your in a market crop area. As I live in a rural area, there are tons of farm tractor dealerships here, and naturally you can find tons of Cubs, Massey, Deere, AC and MM units around. If you lived in a bigger city your choices were limited to some of the many MTD or Murray models, probably the Bolens, and wheel horses. There were a lot of tractors that came from JC Penny, Brown/Lynch/Scott, Western auto, Gambles, and other hardware type stores. Most were built by who ever they could get the best deal on left over parts with. There are many more examples than I care to write up.

 

Now not to promote Sears, but as a catalog company they were a powerhouse of mass marketing. Under the DB and Roper name they built 10's of thousands of tractors and attachments,(500,000 tractors by 1975) mostly in the same factory from 1933 to 1986. During the 30's to the 60's DB shipped boxcar loads of stuff to Sears branch warehouses all around the county, these warehouses in turn shipped "bundles" out the homeowners via the LCL(less than a carload) system on trains. The railroads ended this in the 60's and things went by truck freight. Sears also printed out many  catalogs for the same year, that were regional. If you lived, say in Texas or NC, your copy didn't have a snowblade or snow blower listed, as they really weren't needed in that area.  Montgomery Wards did some of the same things in there line, but unlike Sears they had Simplicity or Midland built the tractors, where as Sears owned the factories.

 

There is probably enough info out there to write up a book on the subject of Regional GT's and the men that made them. You could even include some info on the many different small gas engines that powered them over the last hundred yrs.

Those are some interesting facts of the GT world from before my time. Thanks.


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