Jump to content

Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Ww Grinder I Got


  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#16 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

NUTNDUN

    Lost in Cyber Space

  • Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 3
  • 10,304 Thanks
  • 15,618 posts
  • Location: Pennsylvania

Posted October 18, 2015 - 08:10 AM

Posted January 24, 2015 - 12:43 PM

here is a manaul I found a while back.  Im having issues with this unit chipping/grinding so will tray to take apart this week to see if I can sharpen the blades.  Many say you can just reverse them.
 
Owners Manual Chipper Model 250.8.pdf



I tried to open up the PDF and it error out. Could you repost or emailed me back to get the owners manual for this unit.
 
Thanks.

 

It seems the attachment that was posted in the other post has been deleted or lost. Would need to have the original poster upload it again.



#17 lyall OFFLINE  

lyall

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2180
  • 1,907 Thanks
  • 1,489 posts
  • Location: State Center, Iowa

Posted October 20, 2015 - 04:57 PM

Attached File  Owners Manual Chipper Model 250.8.pdf   7MB   1565 downloads

 

also put in the Manual section under  Outdoor Power Equipment


Edited by lyall, October 20, 2015 - 05:02 PM.


#18 Stephen Brickles OFFLINE  

Stephen Brickles
  • Member
  • Member No: 83630
  • 0 Thanks
  • 1 posts
  • Location: Beverly, MA

Posted June 25, 2016 - 03:34 PM

Hi, I just aquired one of these with identical blades to yours - could you describe how you sharpened the blades exactly ?

Thanks !!

 

 

After I dug in to the grinder, I found my grinder blades were different than the manual.  Mine were square large chunks of metal.  I treid removing the drum blades but could not remove the barring to be able to slide the shaft over the welded nut inside the casing.  So I sharpend them attached.

 

I was able to remove the blade from the chip wheel and sharpen that by removing two bolts that attached the blade to the wheel.

 

Pics attachted.  I chipped a 2-3: pine log as a test in the chipper shoot and it came out like large sawdust pellets so think it is working now.  Will know more once I take it back to the farm.



#19 WagonBill OFFLINE  

WagonBill

    New Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 5549
  • 1 Thanks
  • 3 posts
  • Location: Puyallup, Washington

Posted August 02, 2016 - 02:46 AM

I got a used WW Grinder Renegade 250 and the blades on it were dull. The branch chipper blade was relatively easy to get to. Just take the bolts off the funnel feeder tube. The bolts are all exposed. The blade is held on with allen head bolts, but you can hold the allen head secure, then turn the bolts on the other side with a box head wrench to make it easier to turn. 

 

I had lots of trouble with the chipper blades, but I was successful in turning them around to the sharp sides. There's 4 corners you can use before they need to be replaced or sharpened. First tilt the machine backward so the bottom is exposed, then take the lower screen off. This model has 6 free spinning blades on each of the 3 rods. On the right side of each rod is a sleeve with a hole with a hollow-bushing pressure fit to keep the rod from sliding out. Mine was not easy to see because it had debris covering the hole. The hole is 3/16", so I used a 5/32" punch to push it out, then the sleeves and blades can come out and turned around to the sharp edges. One side has a larger hole than the other. Hammer the punch from the small hole out of the larger hole. It wasn't easy for me to get the bushings out because I broke 2 punches in the process. I spent $15 on punches, but a local lawnmower repairman quoted me $70 for him to do it. I got off cheaper plus I learned how to do it for next time! 

 

Now that I see how well it's made, you can see that it's made for years of hard work. 

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • 00064581-00003.png

Edited by WagonBill, August 02, 2016 - 02:58 AM.

  • Alc said thank you

#20 jpcallan OFFLINE  

jpcallan
  • Member
  • Member No: 86071
  • 4 Thanks
  • 1 posts
  • Location: Portland, Oregon

Posted March 04, 2017 - 08:01 PM

Hi, I just aquired one of these with identical blades to yours - could you describe how you sharpened the blades exactly ?

Thanks !!

 

Hello,

 

I have a Renegade 250 with a 5 HP Briggs & Stratton engine that I bought new in the later 1980s. Mine has the square bolt-on hammer knives in the grinder-shredder section. See page 7, photo 9 in the Renegade 250 Owner's manual that is downloadable from this thread.

 

We used our machine extensively. What I found was the WW Grinder did not use very good steel for either the chipper knife nor the grinder hammer knives. After wasting much time swapping through a rotation of three chipper knives (bought as spare parts), and rotating the grinder knives to bring up a new sharp corner, I had three new chipper knives custom made from D2 chromium tool steel.

 

The knife making company, Messenger Knife Grinding of Portland, Oregon, makes knives for huge log pealing machines that make veneer, and big knives for paper making machines. These people knew something about knives, so I had them design new knives for the Renegade 250. Their advice was to heat treat and temper D2 tool steel so it would stay very sharp, but still be tough enough to survive impacts against the branches without chipping out the edge or cracking. The chemical content for D2 tool steel is 1.4 to 1.6 percent carbon, 0.60 manganese, 11.00 to 13.00 chromium, 0.30 nickel, 1.10 vanadium, and 0.70 to 1.20 molybdenum. Sorry, I can't remember the Rockwell hardness they chose. The knife blades they made for the chipper were a complete success, lasting at least five times longer between sharpenings. The old chipper knives would smoke instead of chip after less than an afternoon of work.

 

With such good results on the chipper side of the machine, I had MKG make a set of new square knives for the grinder section, also made from hardened D2 steel, but made from 5/16" instead of 1/4" stock. The thicker stock gave the grinder rotor more momentum to keep spinning and not bog down when too big a batch of branches was fed in. Since I only have a 5 HP engine, this was a bigger deal for me than for owners with 8 HP engines. Again, the new grinder knives stay sharp much longer. The extra spinning mass also did make a difference in how quickly the grinder bogs down and stalls.


  • DougT, Alc, lyall and 1 other said thanks




Top