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Engine Rebuild Hh120


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#16 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 03:25 PM

Wow!  I just had to look that one up. :thumbs:

 

Sure enough, there's a Wikipedia page for "swamp yankee"

When I got out of the Army and moved to NE CT in 79, one of my neighbors told me that the cheapest guys around were "swamp yankees". I decided to make that my goal. Previously my top sergeant and platoon sergeant had called me the cheapest LT in the Army. The tradition continues. I can generally get more life out of machines than most people. Now I will have to look it up.

 

This was interesting  http://swampyankees....amp-history.asp

 

I define it as stubborn to my beliefs. Part of that is the old USCG mantra of: nobody dies on my watch and the USACE ideal: try, adapt and make do.


Edited by boyscout862, September 02, 2013 - 03:41 PM.


#17 Canawler OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 03:39 PM

That's one of the things I love about the internet, you get exposed to all the regional sayings.  The Wiki page makes it sound like that's pretty much an eastern CT/RI saying.  I was just in eastern CT last week.  I could have slipped that one into the conversation and they would've thought I was a local. :D


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#18 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 04:20 PM

That's one of the things I love about the internet, you get exposed to all the regional sayings. The Wiki page makes it sound like that's pretty much an eastern CT/RI saying. I was just in eastern CT last week. I could have slipped that one into the conversation and they would've thought I was a local. :D

Jim, no way.. The "Yunz", "hoagie", "crick", "chipped ham", "stickybuns",
"pierogies" and "pocketbook" in the surrounding sentences would've given you away... Besides, we've talked and you pronounce your "r"'s very well...

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#19 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 05:10 PM

Take it apart and mic the cylinder and crank before you even think about parts. That set said standard size only. If this is going to be your first rebuild pick an easier and cheaper engine. Pick a cheap engine to prctice on. Try doing a swamp yankee overhaul where you disassemble, hone, lap, polish, clean and reassemble the engine with new gaskets and seals. IF it wasn't too warn, it will run pretty good. Good Luck, Rick

Only problem with the swamp yankee method is that you invest time and effort in a project and are rolling the dice on the results., but hey, its worked before, for awhile, then comes the posting 3-6 months later, "need to rebuild engine", all previous time and effort is wasted and sometimes the engine is a goner. I like the guy on this forum whose signature reads "Murphy was an optimist" man no truer words were spoken, for when you try and cut corners/save money it usually ends up costing more in the end. And as I preach this, I've done it before, and may be guilty of it again, but this forum is about sharing information and experience in order to hep you as best as we can. You need to really understand the tolerances/specifications and basic engine service before tackling  this project, but with all the manuals and members with experience to help you, you'll be able to do. Just remember it always easier to ask a stupid question tha it is to fix a stupid mistake. Good Luck


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#20 chiefgoodman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 05:14 PM

Only problem with the swamp yankee method is that you invest time and effort in a project and are rolling the dice on the results., but hey, its worked before, for awhile, then comes the posting 3-6 months later, "need to rebuild engine", all previous time and effort is wasted and sometimes the engine is a goner. I like the guy on this forum whose signature reads "Murphy was an optimist" man no truer words were spoken, for when you try and cut corners/save money it usually ends up costing more in the end. And as I preach this, I've done it before, and may be guilty of it again, but this forum is about sharing information and experience in order to hep you as best as we can. You need to really understand the tolerances/specifications and basic engine service before tackling  this project, but with all the manuals and members with experience to help you, you'll be able to do. Just remember it always easier to ask a stupid question tha it is to fix a stupid mistake. Good Luck

Thats' why I'm asking the questions before I just take it apart. I want to do it once and not have a worry for a long time.


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#21 chiefgoodman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 06:20 PM

how would I know if my crankshaft is bent?


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#22 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 06:36 PM

Chief, 

I'd suggest tearing the engine down, then take the block, crankshaft, and perhaps the old piston and connecting rod with you to a good machinist.  Work with them to find the specs they need for your engine, then let them tell you what you need.  See if you can find what they suggest, tell them if there need to be any substitutions.  Get the new parts, take them to them, then they will do what they need to to make things fit.  Then you can put everything back together.


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#23 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 06:37 PM

how would I know if my crankshaft is bent?

That's a toughy, a machine shop would be able to tell. The only one Ive had bent - bent I was actually able to see the flywheel "wobble" slightly as I turned it over. I had taken what was left of the rod off and was able to put the engine back together pretty easily to spin it around. Then it was obvious.

The rod had broken up towards the piston and had hammered around the inside hard before doing a sudden stop by wedging into the corner of the case. If your engine can turn over two whole revolutions without hitting, its possible that the rod broke down towards the crank end and it is probably ok. Only guarantee is to take it somewhere, but I would take a chance on it.

As for the swamp Yankee stuff being a bad idea, it depends.
On Ryan's engine, we took a few shortcuts. We did new rings and mix - n - match used rod, piston crank. He uses it to plow, pull stuff, snow blow, and etc. next year I hope to have a mower deck resurrected for him. Even with all it will do, I discovered the points were mis gapped and may have been for a LONG time. Don't know how I missed that, other than Kid at Christmas excited to get it running for him. It has even more pep now that we have them right.

I know we were taking a chance, but it payed off this time. That was three years ago.
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#24 chiefgoodman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 07:13 PM

Chief, 

I'd suggest tearing the engine down, then take the block, crankshaft, and perhaps the old piston and connecting rod with you to a good machinist.  Work with them to find the specs they need for your engine, then let them tell you what you need.  See if you can find what they suggest, tell them if there need to be any substitutions.  Get the new parts, take them to them, then they will do what they need to to make things fit.  Then you can put everything back together.

I think that is the direction I am heading. Hard to tell what else could be wrong when it isn't apart. Thank you for the advice.



#25 chiefgoodman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 07:15 PM

That's a toughy, a machine shop would be able to tell. The only one Ive had bent - bent I was actually able to see the flywheel "wobble" slightly as I turned it over. I had taken what was left of the rod off and was able to put the engine back together pretty easily to spin it around. Then it was obvious.

The rod had broken up towards the piston and had hammered around the inside hard before doing a sudden stop by wedging into the corner of the case. If your engine can turn over two whole revolutions without hitting, its possible that the rod broke down towards the crank end and it is probably ok. Only guarantee is to take it somewhere, but I would take a chance on it.

As for the swamp Yankee stuff being a bad idea, it depends.
On Ryan's engine, we took a few shortcuts. We did new rings and mix - n - match used rod, piston crank. He uses it to plow, pull stuff, snow blow, and etc. next year I hope to have a mower deck resurrected for him. Even with all it will do, I discovered the points were mis gapped and may have been for a LONG time. Don't know how I missed that, other than Kid at Christmas excited to get it running for him. It has even more pep now that we have them right.

I know we were taking a chance, but it payed off this time. That was three years ago.

I can move my flyweel about an inch and a half. When I take it apart I will put the crank back in and see if the flywheel has a wobble.


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#26 OkieGt OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2013 - 08:08 PM

how would I know if my crankshaft is bent?

Generally you dont see bent cranks as the connecting rod is aluminum and there are no bearings. Sometimes you will see a worn crank and that can be turned down to fit an undersize rod or built up to fit a standard rod, but your putting the cart before the horse, in a small way, gotta tear into it first and start taking measurements. Realize that Tecumseh parts are getting real hard to find, mostly in the piston, rings, and to some degree rods, You really need to tear it apart find out if it is rebuildable and that you can get parts, or find another good engine or repower with a newer engine. If you repower you will need to go up several HP to compensate for those lying SOBs that make engines


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#27 chiefgoodman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 06, 2013 - 11:21 PM

UPDATE

 

Tonight I tore my engine down. Took about 3 1/2 hours. Nothing on the tractor was apart, but everything came apart pretty easily. The tough part was getting the last two engine mounts. I ended up taking the bolt out of the front axle and jacking the front up. That was annoying! From what I can see, the piston looks to be in good shape. The head is pretty smooth, just needs a cleaning. The connecting rod is obviously broke, but the numbers on it look strange. Anybody make any sense of it? Really didn't expect to see the word ALCOA on it. Head gasket looks ok but it will get replaced. Crankcase gasket is almost non-existent. I found a couple of pieces of what broke off the connecting rod, but doesn't appear to have caused any damage. Is it safe to use engine brite or GUNK to clean all these parts? Then hosing them off is ok?

 

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#28 EricFromPa ONLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 03:14 PM

Looks like someone may have been inside of that engine before.

What is stamped on the top of the piston?Can't quite make it out.

 

post-6021-0-67865600-1378527546.jpg

 

You may get lucky and be able to just clean the crank journal up,replace the rod and give the cylinder a good honing.


Edited by EricFromPa, September 09, 2013 - 03:37 PM.

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#29 chiefgoodman OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 08:12 PM

I will have to clean the head to take a look. I did do so some measuring last night. It does seem as if someone has worked on it before. The crankshaft is undersized as well as the piston bolt and bore.

#30 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 08:16 PM

I will have to clean the head to take a look. I did do so some measuring last night. It does seem as if someone has worked on it before. The crankshaft is undersized as well as the piston bolt and bore.


The stamp will be in the piston. It should be a 10, 20, 30
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