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Which Type Of Garage Lighting Is Best?


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#1 New.Canadian.DB.Owner OFFLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2013 - 06:20 PM

I am rebuilding my garage and that gives me an opportunity to install new & better lighting. What type of lighting would you pick: standard screw-in light bulbs, normal 4 foot florescent lights, 4 foot LED tubes, standard base LED bulbs, standard base CFL's, mix-n-match, etc?

 

Factors to consider:

   1)  I live in Canada & we get below zero temperatures, so cold starting is important.

   2)  The more power dedicated to lighting, the less I have for the toys like my welder.

   3)  Adjustable height would be nice.

   4)  The budget is not meager, but there are limits.

 

 


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#2 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2013 - 06:58 PM

Compact florescent that screw into standard light bulb sockets.

 

Compared to incandescent bulb they burn less hydro.

Compared to standard florescent tubes they start when cold, not full brightness but after 5 minutes they are.


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#3 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2013 - 07:03 PM

I use the standard screw in bulbs. But that just gives spot lighting effect. My favorite is the halogen lights. 

Best part that I like about halogen in winter, is it gives one little heat spot to warm my fingers in the unheated shed.


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#4 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2013 - 07:08 PM

I would go with a mix n match. In my little shed, I have 2 of the newer style fluorescents that (almost) always start... I also have 2 old fashioned lights, one being my trouble light on the same switch. In the winter, I leave these on too so I can see if I just have to step In and grab something or if I have to wait for the fluorescents to come on I can still do a few things.
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#5 gopher OFFLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2013 - 07:23 PM

The led is by far the least energy consumer of them all . If below 10 below compact fluorescent sometime does not work. Go to building supplier store they usually have lighting displays close enough to compare you can decide what one will give you the kind of light your wanting. But the led cost  about 1/2  what compact flur. to operate.    


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#6 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted September 01, 2013 - 08:37 PM

Old school 4' fluorescent for me,( just get the units for cold area's, they start right up in cold weather).

LED's are great energy savers, but until the cost comes down a lot I think you could spend a grand real easy for a bright area.

But, I would also look into some LED task lighting, I use them for service work, 12v units that we charge in our trucks between calls, they work great, very bright, long lasting too. We also have 120v LED lights for jobs that are longer than a hour, both drop lights and flood, just remember you get what you pay for, when it comes to LED's cheap = blue-weak, and 100 bucks gets you white & bright. :thumbs: 


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#7 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 06:58 AM

Add a woodstove to keep you and the lights warmer. I like four foot flourescents but they don't seem to last very long any more. If you just put a duplex outlet where you want lights, you can then play with it as you like. Good Luck, Rick

Edited by boyscout862, September 10, 2013 - 06:59 AM.

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#8 TerryD OFFLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 07:20 AM

I put halogen floods in the corners of my garage and compact fluorescents suspended from the ceiling with old school barn lamp shade reflectors. The halogens are on separate switches so I can turn them on for extra light when doing detail work.
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#9 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 09:26 AM

I have the 4' double row compact Florence lights in the shop and I have been pretty happy with them.  But that been said I don't get the cold temps you do so I really don't know how they would be up there.  When I wired up my shop I did do like Rick suggested and used duplex outlet's and plug the lights into them.  I figured if I had to change out one of those monsters it would be a whole lot easier to just unplug it and remove a couple of screw then to have to worry about rewiring it.  


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#10 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 06:33 PM

8' tube fluorescents work good for general purpose usually last pretty good and for a little more they come with a cold start ballast, you may have to check with local electrical supplier for those.

I too use the duplex outlet method. I have several located around the room for possible movement or additions of lights.I use a different color outlet plate so I know which ones are on the switch. remember don't put too many outlets on one circuit, ( follow code for your area, check with local building inspector), but you will only draw on how many lights you have plugged in and have the ability to move or add lights as needed. my garage has 5 lights (3- 8' and 2 -4' with pull switches over dedicated areas ) on a single 15 amp circuit 

IMG_0489.JPG

note the reflective foil faced insulation to help with heat and light reflection

i also have portable stand halogens for a extra boost of light when needed, and a little heat too.


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#11 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 07:01 PM

T8 fluorescent 4ft work good. The have electronic ballasts, so you don't get that

annoying flicker/flutter that you get from the older/larger T12 bulbs. I've never

had a problem with cold start up, and haven't changed a bulb in 8 years, since new.


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#12 NJKen OFFLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 07:33 PM

T8 fluorescent 4ft work good. The have electronic ballasts, so you don't get that
annoying flicker/flutter that you get from the older/larger T12 bulbs. I've never
had a problem with cold start up, and haven't changed a bulb in 8 years, since new.


Yep great suggestion.

Most T-8 fixtures have "0 degree" starting ballasts. Can go to T-8 HO for below 0

I went with T-5 HO fixtures in my garage/shop. And LOTs of them. Can't ever have too much light IMO.
I have 4 rows of 8' 4 lamp fixtures. But each row is on its own switch. One or two rows on is great general light. All four on I can do surgery.
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#13 HydroHarold OFFLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 09:19 PM

Yep great suggestion.

Most T-8 fixtures have "0 degree" starting ballasts. Can go to T-8 HO for below 0

I went with T-5 HO fixtures in my garage/shop. And LOTs of them. Can't ever have too much light IMO.
I have 4 rows of 8' 4 lamp fixtures. But each row is on its own switch. One or two rows on is great general light. All four on I can do surgery.

 

So that's the glow I see in the sky Southwest of here!  You must have the doors open!:D

 

I had 4 T8's put in a couple years ago and they work very well.  It still takes 'em a short time to warm up in the cold, but no flicker.  With the wattage I had left over I removed the tungsten 150's from the 2 regular sockets left and put in 45w. CFL spirals.  They take a while to light but fill nicely.


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#14 Canawler OFFLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2013 - 11:21 AM

All four on I can do surgery.

 

Now you've got me thinking...  an OR light would be great in the shop.... hmmmm.


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#15 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2013 - 12:38 PM

You better not leave them on or HH may show up @ your shop!!

 

4 4' T8's on the roof and some old juice-hog 8' 300 watters over the workbenches for thes old eyes to see something..  

 

And HH-  I keep the doors closed!!  :D






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