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#91 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 07:01 PM

 

I have already bought the 3/8 X 5" expansion anchors and the hammer drill. Dug through all my receipts and can't seem to find the receipt for the bolts.

 

Most stores around here would at least give you a store credit for the bolts w/o a receipt, I too agree with epoxy ones at this point.


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#92 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 07:51 PM

There are tens of thousands of pole buildings with concrete floors that have no footers.I have one.



#93 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 07:54 PM

Most stores around here would at least give you a store credit for the bolts w/o a receipt, I too agree with epoxy ones at this point.

You could just epoxy the expansion bolts in. Drill your hole like normal, then clean it out and epoxy your bolt. Just a thought.


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#94 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 08:52 PM

You could just epoxy the expansion bolts in. Drill your hole like normal, then clean it out and epoxy your bolt. Just a thought.

That is my thought, will need to find the $$$ for the epoxy. This slab is turning out worse than the BMP aka Blue Money Pit. :wallbanging:


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#95 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 09:11 PM

There are tens of thousands of pole buildings with concrete floors that have no footers.I have one.

He's not building a pole barn...totally different type of construction. Pole barn vertical weight is on the poles not the slab. He will have load bearing walls on the perimeter edges of the slab. Given his location a thicker pour on the edges or a shallow footer would give him more concrete to anchor his walls properly.


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#96 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 09:22 PM

It is what it it is. I am trying to salavage what I have so I can move on to the next step of erecting walls and having the tin delivered (all purchesed). Electrical and insulation will need to wait.



#97 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2013 - 10:53 PM

It is what it it is. I am trying to salavage what I have so I can move on to the next step of erecting walls and having the tin delivered (all purchesed). Electrical and insulation will need to wait.

 

That is my thought, will need to find the $$$ for the epoxy. This slab is turning out worse than the BMP aka Blue Money Pit. :wallbanging:

 

I'm not trying to be rude and I am currently building so I understand the rush and urge to get it finished  but sometimes I have to be told "SLOW DOWN" too. So... slow down. What I mean is that you had your first pour less than two weeks ago and now you seemed rushed to get a roof on... yet we are talking about a building that will be standing (if done right) long after you are gone!! Unless there is some undisclosed time limitations, step back and consider doing it the best you reasonably can.

 

Of course, I'll also tell you like I tell my wife... some things you just need to splurge on!!!


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#98 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 04:33 AM

I can feel for you. Several years ago I had built a shed that ran over budget. It took a lot longer to get finished.


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#99 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 07:27 AM

Construction almost always goes over budget(money and time). No matter how experienced you are, there are always things that can't be forseen. When planning projects years ago as a town engineer, I'd add 25% to the money and a month or two to the time. That way I looked like I knew what I was doing.

 

On the other hand, I started my house in 88, we moved in in 99 and its still not finished because everything is now in the way. I ran over budget because I hit ledge when digging the cellar hole and boulders everywhere. I spent 1000 hours digging with my AC HD6G and another 1000 hours repairing her. There was an area 20' x 40' x 2.5' of granite that was in my way. It took most of a summer to take it down. I couldn't blast because of cost and the damage it would do to the ledge that I was going to pour my footings on. That cost me a year and a few thousand.

 

We poured the foundation with my home built forms. I planned to use the 2" x 4" s and plywood from the forms for framing the house. I ran into problems with the cellar hole sides collasping in on the foundation walls before I was ready. It became a slow and difficult process to dig out, put in drainage, waterproof, insulate, and back fill around the walls. This cost me over a year. Then my wife had an accident and I had to take care of her for months. Then she got pregnant and I got a very intense project at work for two years.

 

When I got the time(it was 5 years after pouring), it turned out that 1/2 the wood had rotted. IT had been stickered and covered but mice got in and made a mess that held water. It was a long struggle but worth it. Someday, I'll finish the bathroom and do the trim work. We live comfortably and cheaply in our passive solar house.

 

Building a project is like a hitch in the military: get through it and don't do anything that you will later regret. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, September 10, 2013 - 07:29 AM.

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#100 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 07:02 PM

I agree with the slow down, but the tin has been purchased and needs delivered, the wood in in my 12 X 24 shed acting as a second floor. I don't have any where dey to store the tin so I need to get the walls up so I can have the tin delivered. I do plan on setting the tin on the 2X3's left over from the 2nd pour and atempting to cover it with something.


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#101 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 08:07 PM

We're all pulling for you & not only sharing your excitement but your frustration as well. I'be had my own remodeling business since 1993 & not to sound negitive but in this business many things don't go as planned. Depending on your metal make sure when you cover it that it can breath. I was a GF on a large church project & was assured nothing would rust....well it didn't but it had faded spots near the edges. Once your done all your hard work will be rewarded.

#102 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2013 - 08:08 PM

GC general contractor. Lol

#103 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2013 - 03:58 AM

Start building the walls now and cover them up with a tarp until you have the time/Money to buy the fasteners and letting the slab cure more..  (**I know-  you won't be able to ride your toys around on the slab anymore!)   :boo_hoo: 

 

You could even stand them up and put in just a few fasteners in strategic places and once you get all the lumber up install a bunch of braces to hold the walls square and give them support.  You can remove them once the tin is on as it will hold things in place..  The weight of the framing will hold the thing down pretty dang good unless you are in a Tornado zone!!!  Once you get the tin on you will need to really worry about the wind making a mess of things so the ancoring should be done by then.   Just my 2 cents..   

 

My BIL is in the process of building as 24' x 40' kit barn right now as well..  

 

BTW-  Air nailers make it SOOO much easier!! :cowboy_shooter:



#104 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2013 - 04:01 AM

Here's how to brace it..  

 

Wall Brace.jpg


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#105 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2013 - 08:47 PM

I broke down and bought the adhesive, after reading the reviews I think this stuff will work. I also removed the expansion ring from the 3/8 lag bolts so they won't need hammered in. I re-drilled the bottom boards with a 1/2 bit and moved the holes 1/2" closer to the inner wall to give me more concrete to the edge. I plan on setting the bottom wall boards and fastining the ends together and squareing it up. Then use the hammer drill through the board holes to start the holes in the concrete about 1/8 - 1/2". Then remove the bottom boards and complete drilling all 39 holes to 3" deep. I'll charge the airtank and blow all the holes out real well. At this point I follow the instructions on the epoxy and set the bolts. What do you think? 

Oh, and it never fails, I only went in for epoxy, and the new saw blades seemed to jump in my hand.

 

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