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#46 Guest_gravely-power_*

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 05:33 PM

I am super glad that it has worked out for you.  I have never accepted a hot load of concrete. To me it was always a diverted load and I didn't want it.



#47 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 06:23 PM

I will try and keep it wet, trying to fix my sprinkler.


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#48 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 06:36 PM

That look much better! I know it cost more, but that is looking like one tough floor. Good luck!



#49 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 07:02 PM

Larry, the LONGER that you can keep the concrete WET, the better that it will cure.  The faster that it dries out, the lower the final strength will be.  Not trying to freak you out or scare you but just the plain old facts.  If you have a piece of Polyethylene that will cover it, wet it down good, put the poly over it and let it sit for about a week.    If will probably be stronger than you will ever have to worry about even if you dont keep it wet.

Had to take today off from work, and probally tomorrow too. All I can do is run the sprinkler intermittent while the sun is up and only through tomorrow. I will soak it good before going to bed. I guess after that It will be what it is.



#50 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 07:36 PM

Some more pictures. The chute on the truck got clogged because the concrete was setting up at the end.

 

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#51 Ryan313 ONLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 07:59 PM

The Hoover Dam was not a continues pour. You are right about the cooling system though. When they poured the concrete they poured it with interlocking blocks that had pipes running through them. Then, they pumped ice water through then; once the concrete was cured they back filled the pipes with more concrete.

#52 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 08:02 PM

The Hoover Dam was not a continues pour. You are right about the cooling system though. When they poured the concrete they poured it with interlocking blocks that had pipes running through them. Then, they pumped ice water through then; once the concrete was cured they back filled the pipes with more concrete.

 

I could be wrong, but on the Hoover Dam, I always thought they used an ammonia cooling system in the pipes, much like what camper refrigerators use???

  I could be wrong, as I have been before more times than I care to admit.  Just seems I read about it.



#53 Ryan313 ONLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 08:15 PM

I could be wrong, but on the Hoover Dam, I always thought they used an ammonia cooling system in the pipes, much like what camper refrigerators use???
I could be wrong, as I have been before more times than I care to admit. Just seems I read about it.


No, they used ice water. I did a report on the Hoover Dam for school a couple months ago.
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#54 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 08:20 PM

Ice water is out of the question. I will apply plain water (sprinkler) intermittent through tomorrow evening (trying my best to keep it wet). It is about 1" in the center and 3" on the edges. Hopefully it will cure proper.



#55 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 08:20 PM

No, they used ice water. I did a report on the Hoover Dam for school a couple months ago.

 

It could be that the cooling system to chill the water was done with the system I spoke of, but I can't be sure, as I can't find any info on what type chiller they used.

 

And Larry....GREAT that you got this all taken care of!



#56 Ryan313 ONLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 08:26 PM

It could be that the cooling system to chill the water was done with the system I spoke of, but I can't be sure, as I can't find any info on what type chiller they used.

And Larry....GREAT that you got this all taken care of!



Try the link below.

http://www.usbr.gov/...chures/faq.html
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#57 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2013 - 10:58 PM

No, they used ice water. I did a report on the Hoover Dam for school a couple months ago.

I did too back in college... Amazing how many men died building it. Folks where hungry back in those days and did what they had to do (not to bring up politics). I only know what I found while researching (WAY before Wiki too). They basically ran coils through it like a heat exchanger, after that section was cool they cut the tubing off and pumped them full of grout. I need to dig up that report. That was a few years back.



#58 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2013 - 08:35 AM

Almost surely the chiller was an ammonia system, as most were in the day. 



#59 TAHOE ONLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2013 - 08:48 AM

The Hoover Dam was not a continues pour. You are right about the cooling system though. When they poured the concrete they poured it with interlocking blocks that had pipes running through them. Then, they pumped ice water through then; once the concrete was cured they back filled the pipes with more concrete.

 

Thanks, that's what I should've wrote. They may have done non-stop pouring, but as you said it was in blocks...I watched a documentary on it a while back. Concrete stays hot, literally, for a few days, even weeks as it cures.

Daniel is probably right, they may have used ice, but the chilling mechanism could have used an ammoina system. We use about 15,000-20,000 pounds of ice here at work in a 24 hr period in our manufacturing, our ice house/system is made with an ammonia system to make it freeze. It also helps feed our water chiller.

 

Larry, pics look good. Hopefully you can keep it some what wet for a few days, any extra with make for better concrete in the end. Slower curing makes for stronger concrete.


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#60 Guest_gravely-power_*

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Posted September 04, 2013 - 09:30 AM

The Hoover Dam was not a continues pour. You are right about the cooling system though. When they poured the concrete they poured it with interlocking blocks that had pipes running through them. Then, they pumped ice water through then; once the concrete was cured they back filled the pipes with more concrete.

I should have been more specific. It was poured in blocks as there was so much heat, but according to my Grandfather who worked on the dam they poured night and day. That is one reason the dam was finished ahead of schedule.






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