Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

The New Shop


  • Please log in to reply
577 replies to this topic

#16 larrybl ONLINE  

larrybl

    Texas Member

  • Site Supporter
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 415
  • 4,941 Thanks
  • 3,322 posts
  • Location: Central Texas

Posted August 28, 2013 - 10:51 PM

Hate to say it but from the pics there is nothing to do other then tear it out and start over. One thing you could look into is if the load was hot when it got there. You need to call the company that brought it and ask them to send a rep out with the batch weights and batch time on them. Also did you put plastic down first or at least wet the ground first as the dry ground will just suck the water out fast. Also did you do a little at a time or just poured a bunch out.

I had a full vapor barrior (tarps) and hosed it down prior to the pour. Unfortunally I had my wife adding water in hopes to keep it pliant while I raked it out. Too much water may have been used on my part. I can't affort to tear it out, The budget for the whole shop is now shrinked to doing Insulation and Electrical 2 years from now (end of the loan to complete the whole shop)



#17 OkieGt OFFLINE  

OkieGt
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 36782
  • 1,427 Thanks
  • 1,447 posts
  • Location: Oologah, Oklahoma

Posted August 28, 2013 - 10:51 PM

I am taking a suggestion I received. I don't want to have another $700.00 botched pour due to lack of man power or experance. I am contacting at least (4) local contractors that specialize in concrete repair locally for a quote to fix this. Better spend the extra $$$ and fix it right. I can get the insulation and electrical later.

Best decision you'll ever make, time to cut your losses and fix the problem right. If you do have to bust it up, you'll have some crusher for the drive or to raise/fill the pad



#18 Alc OFFLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,446 Thanks
  • 6,611 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted August 29, 2013 - 05:54 AM

I friend whom does mansory work used that resurfacer yeasr ago on his aunt patio that the whole top layer over the year came off ( spalding ? )  he said it came out great , how that's all your going to need . And I know how you feel , I HATE concrete work !!!  I've NEVER did any by myself  that I was happy with . I can help place it but when it come to getting the right finish I stink  lol



#19 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,753 Thanks
  • 7,523 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted August 29, 2013 - 07:08 AM

I have been involved with concrete work for many years. First thing is that temperature makes a huge difference. On 90 degree or above days I won't pour. Concrete cures by a chemical process not drying as most people think. The higher the temp the faster it sets and then cures. I've been told of ice used in the trucks to cool down the load(at extra cost). Another problem is that it has to have adequate water to cure to full strength. That is why good concrete crews will pour jobs like this first thing in the morning. They will cover it to keep water in and excess heat out.

 

You will probably see this slab crack in numerous places in the next two weeks. Depending on how much it cracks and how soft the concrete feels( I test existing concrete with a geologists pick to get and idea of the strenght) you can then decide whether to pull it out or just pour over it.

 

When doing any kind of constuction work the 7 Ps always apply. Concrete trucks don't actually deliver a yardage. The ticket will really be for a tonnage. I always add 10% to the order because its better to have a bit left over. If there is limited manpower break the job into small manageable pours. Joints in a slab are not a problem if you use rebar and a properly designed joint. Use strong forms and set them so that you are pouring to the top of the forms. The top of the form should be smooth and unobstructed so that you can use it as a screed guide. This will save alot of time and labor. Use a vibrator when placing the concrete to prevent voids but do not over vibrate.

 

That slab size looked to me like there should have been atleast three men on the crew. I made the mistake of my wife and I trying to pour a 3 cy grout pour oursleves. It was too much. Fortunately the driver(a Marine) got out of the truck and gave a hand. Gary had been to our house(under constuction) many times because I used about 200 cy in our house.

 

Always get the ticket from the driver and read it before signing. In 2008 I poured about 700 truck loads and on atleast 5 trucks they had sent the wrong type of concrete. We were building bridges and needed the high strenght.

 

I was taught in the 1950s that it is cheaper and easier to work with nature. I prefer to pour concrete in cool weather. When the daytime high is around 70 is perfect. Higher or lower temperatures adds to cost and usually increases risks to the quality of the job. In you case, I would water and cover that slab. Check it several times a day to make sure it is wet. This may help reduce cracking and increase the strength. After a few weeks you can evaluate whether it is worth covering or should just be removed.

 

I realize that this has been long and complicated. Unfortunately, doing good concrete work is complicated. Good Luck, Rick

 

I looked at the pics again and realized that you are keeping it wet. That is great. You may be able to pour a topping on that but I would still wait to see how strong the slab is. Pressure wash it and you may be able to put welded wire mesh over the existing slab and pour over that.


Edited by boyscout862, August 29, 2013 - 07:15 AM.

  • olcowhand, MH81, Alc and 4 others have said thanks

#20 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

HDWildBill

    Freedom is not Free. Thank those in uniform for your freedom.

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 6354
  • 8,697 Thanks
  • 8,555 posts
  • Location: Ga

Posted August 29, 2013 - 07:45 AM

Larry, I have a couple of buddies that do concrete work and hearing about the problems they go through during a pour I can see how you ran into problem.  You think pouring concrete would be fairly simple but in reality it is a profession and an art.  I think your decision to get a couple of pro's to look at it is a wise one.  I know when they poured my slab there was a crew of 6.  Best of luck!


  • Alc, boyscout862 and oldedeeres have said thanks

#21 TAHOE OFFLINE  

TAHOE
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 24522
  • 6,480 Thanks
  • 4,937 posts
  • Location: "Hamiltucky" Ohio

Posted August 29, 2013 - 09:36 AM

I know you said you added water, but did you wash it down on top trying to slow dry time down? Looks like top layer of mix was washed from rock.

I know you said it was hot and humid, but if it dried that quick, sounds like it was a very hot mix. I try to get a 45 min slump time if I pour, gives me some working time.

My dad and I poured 7 1/2 yds for my garage, thankfully it was cool and it came out okay even though driver was hour late and it started to drizzle.

I heared that some of the Hoover dam is still curing out. I knoe they had to pour it in separate square columns instead of a continous pour so it would cure right.

My uncle was in concrete for 40 plus years, said it goes through 7 different cycles during cure time.


  • Alc and oldedeeres have said thanks

#22 Robert Webb OFFLINE  

Robert Webb

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 6780
  • 878 Thanks
  • 419 posts

Posted August 29, 2013 - 04:23 PM

I dont care what anyone says........if that concrete set within 30 minutes, you got a HOT load of concrete!   Even if they "fresh batched it", if there was ANY concrete left in the truck, it cause a chain reaction and the new concrete set up faster than normal.  Been there and done that............


  • oldedeeres and Sawdust have said thanks

#23 shorty ONLINE  

shorty

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 6172
  • 3,526 Thanks
  • 3,917 posts
  • Location: Lancaster County Pa

Posted August 29, 2013 - 05:30 PM

For the little bit that I have worked with concrete, I am no expert. It sure sounds like you got a "HOT" load. That is just rotten luck to get that while working at your own place. The few times I did flat work for family, we rarely got ahead of it. It usually got ahead of us.



#24 larrybl ONLINE  

larrybl

    Texas Member

  • Site Supporter
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 415
  • 4,941 Thanks
  • 3,322 posts
  • Location: Central Texas

Posted August 29, 2013 - 07:56 PM

I talked with 3 contractors today and described what I had, All 3 agreeded it was a hot batch as it was delivered after 11am and we were at 97 degrees. Two gave me phone estimates of 2000 - 2500 give or take. The third contractor came out, placed a string across the pad, the center is 3" above the sides. He estimates 5 yards to give me 2" at the center and level the pad using a 9 sack concrete mix for a strong cap, Tools and labor $1,500.00. He got the job. Will start Tuesday or Wednesday morining earily.


  • olcowhand, Alc, Texas Deere and Horse and 3 others have said thanks

#25 TAHOE OFFLINE  

TAHOE
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 24522
  • 6,480 Thanks
  • 4,937 posts
  • Location: "Hamiltucky" Ohio

Posted August 30, 2013 - 09:35 AM

Sorry to hear you have to go over budget, good to hear you found someone who can fix it for you.



#26 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

HDWildBill

    Freedom is not Free. Thank those in uniform for your freedom.

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 6354
  • 8,697 Thanks
  • 8,555 posts
  • Location: Ga

Posted August 30, 2013 - 10:22 AM

I know you hated going over budget but at least it is salvageable.  Also when you get into your new shop and get down to working on your tractors you'll probably never notice it.


  • boyscout862 said thank you

#27 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,753 Thanks
  • 7,523 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted August 30, 2013 - 04:52 PM

Are they going to add the wire matts?



#28 WNYTractorTinkerer OFFLINE  

WNYTractorTinkerer

    Tinker Master

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 10789
  • 8,302 Thanks
  • 4,657 posts
  • Location: Avon, NY

Posted August 30, 2013 - 05:06 PM

All the years I have been in business no matter the situation the words "concrete coming" raises every one's adrenalin. 

It shouldn't if you are ready for it!  24' x 24' IS a sizable slab for sure..  You should have had more help and that mix looks WAY dry!!  I'd question the strength of the slab..  I wouldn't be surprised if it started cracking in short order..  I'd definitely be raising the roof at the deliverer's office about the quality of the product he delivered!  I'd question the mix..  Too much water will definitely make for a mix like that..  Take a look HERE

 

Good Luck Larry and I hope you get it straightened out without spending a lot more $$$ to do it!



#29 Sawdust OFFLINE  

Sawdust
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 36549
  • 4,521 Thanks
  • 2,829 posts
  • Location: Butler, Kentucky

Posted August 30, 2013 - 06:51 PM

It shouldn't if you are ready for it!  24' x 24' IS a sizable slab for sure..  You should have had more help and that mix looks WAY dry!!  I'd question the strength of the slab..  I wouldn't be surprised if it started cracking in short order..  I'd definitely be raising the roof at the deliverer's office about the quality of the product he delivered!  I'd question the mix..  Too much water will definitely make for a mix like that..  Take a look HERE

 

Good Luck Larry and I hope you get it straightened out without spending a lot more $$$ to do it!

 

It shouldn't if you are ready for it!  24' x 24' IS a sizable slab for sure..  You should have had more help and that mix looks WAY dry!!  I'd question the strength of the slab..  I wouldn't be surprised if it started cracking in short order..  I'd definitely be raising the roof at the deliverer's office about the quality of the product he delivered!  I'd question the mix..  Too much water will definitely make for a mix like that..  Take a look HERE

 

Good Luck Larry and I hope you get it straightened out without spending a lot more $$$ to do it!

You could be ready but I assure you if someone else isn't or something goes wrong YOUR adrenaline will get high. Before I got smart I use to trim out the interiors of custom homes ( now I remodel them). When we heard "concrete coming" we would stop & watch the chaos. Many times we would break out of our house & help to keep them from loosing it.


  • boyscout862 said thank you

#30 WNYTractorTinkerer OFFLINE  

WNYTractorTinkerer

    Tinker Master

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 10789
  • 8,302 Thanks
  • 4,657 posts
  • Location: Avon, NY

Posted August 30, 2013 - 07:52 PM

Thanks for the double-quote Sawdust!!  The driver is the cause of every bad pour I've ever experienced.  (ANGER & Adrenaline!!) :wallbanging: 

 

If it's a good & experienced driver, things go like clockwork!  It is a lot of work and you get pumped up doing it for sure..

 

I've been in on many floor/sidewalk/basement/ pours and that is just the way things have gone in my experience..  

 

To some folks it may cause what you are talking about for sure..  So please don't get angry with me on a Friday night.. OK??

 

**PS-  Coming over the hill from Florence KY and seeing your hometown @ night is a beautiful sight brother!  Done it many times coming back from visiting our grand kids in Tenn.. :thumbs:


  • boyscout862 said thank you




Top