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The New Shop


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#1 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 08:34 PM

I messed up royal, Ordered 7 yards of concrete and now I have a mess :mad2: . Long story, but sufice to say I have a plan B (sort of). This pad is rougher than the yard it was poured on. Hardend in like 20 minuets in the 100 deg heat barely giving me time to spread most of it out. I plan to buy 82 bags of 80# quickrete and build a 3X4 form and pour 1" squares on top of this. Could someone check my math. Is there a Plan C?

 

Crying in Texas :wallbanging:

 

 

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#2 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 08:50 PM

How far out are you on level? Looks like it might be too far out to consider concrete resurfacer.


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#3 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 08:59 PM

I am sooo pi$$ed. I may have to demo this and start over, or trash the Plans for a new shop all together.



#4 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 09:03 PM

What is this going to be used for? If this is for an out building like mentioned I would consider resurfacing. If not I would form it directly on top making sure each form is level. Start at your highest point just in case you have a drop somewhere then you can simply raise your form to make up the difference.
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#5 Guest_gravely-power_*

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 09:05 PM

If the concrete was mixed right it makes no difference how hot or dry the temp is.. If you were short you could have called for more mix. I've poured a million yds of mix. somebody was not on the ball.


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#6 Alc OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 09:09 PM

Don't give up , how thick where you trying for 3-4 "? Maybe it would pay to get another load and pour it one shot
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#7 Sawdust ONLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 09:27 PM

Work with what you have. Get a good nights sleep & rest then tackle this freshly minded. Since this will be your shop I would resurface. They are a lot of new products out there that have tremendous bonding agents & self level. Your advantage is this will  be sheltered not exposed to the elements & it being a shop. Thirty plus years of construction I feel your pain. With the technology & products we have available today most things can be fixed but you can't give up...get some rest & show us your new floor soon.


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#8 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 09:37 PM

I am taking a suggestion I received. I don't want to have another $700.00 botched pour due to lack of man power or experance. I am contacting at least (4) local contractors that specialize in concrete repair locally for a quote to fix this. Better spend the extra $$$ and fix it right. I can get the insulation and electrical later.


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#9 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 09:45 PM

I am taking a suggestion I received. I don't want to have another $700.00 botched pour due to lack of man power or experance. I am contacting at least (4) local contractors that specialize in concrete repair locally for a quote to fix this. Better spend the extra $$$ and fix it right. I can get the insulation and electrical later.

 

I think you are spot-on getting a specialist to do this for you.  Self leveling concrete seems to be the way to go.  Concrete can be tough to deal with.  I do tend to think this batch was off on the mix, so maybe a specialist can verify it one way or another.  If it can be proven the mix was bad, then you may get restitution from the concrete company.


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#10 Sawdust ONLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 09:57 PM

All the years I have been in business no matter the situation the words "concrete coming" raises every one's adrenalin. 


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#11 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 10:02 PM

I am taking a suggestion I received. I don't want to have another $700.00 botched pour due to lack of man power or experance. I am contacting at least (4) local contractors that specialize in concrete repair locally for a quote to fix this. Better spend the extra $$$ and fix it right. I can get the insulation and electrical later.

Good idea, that is one ugly pour. Hard to tell from here if mix was off, or if it was from the amount of water from hose after the pour.



#12 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 10:03 PM

On our recent concrete pour for the floor of 2 silage pits and loading area, Dad wanted us to do the job ourselves, just Josh & myself.  He estimated 70 yards, but I KNEW he was way off if we wanted a decent level & strong, long lasting floor.  Told him we had to hire a crew, and he finally agreed.  The pour ended up taking 140 yards!!!!!!!   The crew of 8 pro's did a fine job.  NO WAY we could have handled that!  We also had them apply sealer.  Some things you just need to have a pro do, and concrete is one of them most times.


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#13 John@Reliable ONLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 10:14 PM

On our recent concrete pour for the floor of 2 silage pits and loading area, Dad wanted us to do the job ourselves, just Josh & myself.  He estimated 70 yards, but I KNEW he was way off if we wanted a decent level & strong, long lasting floor.  Told him we had to hire a crew, and he finally agreed.  The pour ended up taking 140 yards!!!!!!!   The crew of 8 pro's did a fine job.  NO WAY we could have handled that!  We also had them apply sealer.  Some things you just need to have a pro do, and concrete is one of them most times.

140 yards :oh_shucks:  pro's earned there money that day :thumbs:


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#14 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 10:17 PM

Larry, that's a shame and I'm with the others. I would get a few Pros out there, they should all agree that you can reform and pour over it. A good concrete man will be able to fix it.  Good Luck..


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#15 bhts OFFLINE  

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Posted August 28, 2013 - 10:17 PM

Hate to say it but from the pics there is nothing to do other then tear it out and start over. One thing you could look into is if the load was hot when it got there. You need to call the company that brought it and ask them to send a rep out with the batch weights and batch time on them. Also did you put plastic down first or at least wet the ground first as the dry ground will just suck the water out fast. Also did you do a little at a time or just poured a bunch out.


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