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Weight On The Back For Snapper 1650/snowblower, How Much?


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#1 gtcsreg ONLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2013 - 04:29 PM

Ok, I'm dealing with a Snapper 1650 with a modified Sears snowblower.  I weigh in at about 205 lbs.  I'm fixing a homemade attachment similar to a hitch cargo carrier that would weigh about 30 lbs. itself.  It will have two large old cinder blocks witch I'm guessing weighs about 45 lbs. each.  That should have I think around 120 lbs low and behind the tractor.  Should that be enough?  :anvil_drop:


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#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2013 - 04:47 PM

Only testing it will tell. Theories might help but, the only way to really know is try it. Figure that you will have to play with it several times to work out any bugs. Good Luck, Rick

Edited by boyscout862, July 24, 2013 - 04:48 PM.

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#3 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2013 - 05:38 PM

Chains are a big help when blowing snow or plowing. Some wheel weight is a good choice as well if you can find them at a reasonable price. I would say you'd want a bit more than 120 on there but as others have said it depends on conditions. If you have hills to deal with or a lot of ice then more would be better. 



#4 gtcsreg ONLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2013 - 09:59 PM

Chains are a big help when blowing snow or plowing. Some wheel weight is a good choice as well if you can find them at a reasonable price. I would say you'd want a bit more than 120 on there but as others have said it depends on conditions. If you have hills to deal with or a lot of ice then more would be better. 

Flat as a pancake.  Only did a modest amount of spinning with turf tires with some makeshift weight last year.  Hoping new ag tread the new weights and me counters the weight of the snow blower and engine.  If not, may go the chains route.


Edited by gtcsreg, July 24, 2013 - 10:01 PM.


#5 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2013 - 10:05 PM

Your Ag tires will help in dry snow. In any snow with ice your going to want chains and even those can be marginal in slimy slush.

I would say your going to want at least the weight of your snow blower on the back. The best place to place your weight is in the tire or on the wheel. This will cause less strain on the axles. I broke two so I have some experience with this.  :mad2:


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#6 gtcsreg ONLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2013 - 10:12 PM

Your Ag tires will help in dry snow. In any snow with ice your going to want chains and even those can be marginal in slimy slush.

I would say your going to want at least the weight of your snow blower on the back. The best place to place your weight is in the tire or on the wheel. This will cause less strain on the axles. I broke two so I have some experience with this.  :mad2:

Trying to understand here, how did the weight on the hitch transfer to the axles? Doubt I will put more than around 150 lbs. out back because I don't think what I'm building would safely hold a lot more.



#7 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2013 - 06:08 AM

Trying to understand here, how did the weight on the hitch transfer to the axles? Doubt I will put more than around 150 lbs. out back because I don't think what I'm building would safely hold a lot more.

 

Any weight you place on the frame or hitch of the tractor is carried by the axles. Weight behind the rear axle will also transfer weight off of the front wheels and onto the rear. The same but opposite affect applies to weight ahead of the front axle like a raised snow blower. If you raise the blower and then try to back up a slippery hill you will find that your traction is reduced due to less weight being on the rear wheels and more on the front.  Many GT rear axles are not designed to carry large amounts of weight. Overloading them results in failure. The exception is the largest Peerless rear ends, and some other HD rear axles. If you put the weight on or in the rear wheel, the weight is right where it needs to be to give you traction, it will lower your centre of gravity for better stability and won't add weight to the rear axle load or transfer weight off the front end. 

   Depending on how the tractor steers with the blower on it you may want to put some weight out back to lighten the front end while increasing traction. Once you get that where you want it then any weight added to increase traction would be best added to the rear wheels. No hard and fast rules here but that is how I approach this issue. Personally I find AG tires are not a good choice for snow plowing or blowing. Turfs seem to work better for me and chains are a necessity in my situation. 


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#8 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2013 - 11:16 AM

The Snowblower on my SS12 is a 42"  Me (200) + weights (130) + fluid (100) + an 80#  suitcase weight on the hitch = about 510.

 

Still spun with the blower up on oversize ATV tires on almost no grade whatsoever...Until I put the chains back on, then I cant GET it to spin :D

 

You will probably notice an improvement, but not a lot.  Chains + weight = happy in this case.


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#9 Luke ONLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2013 - 12:21 PM

I've got a 1655 with the Massey/snapper snowblower. My tractor has the Ag tires and I made a 3point weight bar and hang 3 Massey front tractor weight on it off the back. Total weight is 225lbs plus myself weighing in at 220lbs. No weights in the tires. You might need more weight but your best thing to do is throw a set of chains on it! It will make all the difference in the world!
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