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O-Scale Canning Company Building


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#1 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2013 - 02:57 PM

This is the Glen Haven Canning Company building.
It is now part of the Sleeping Bear Dunes National Park in Glen Arber Michigan and is a museum.

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History of Glen Haven. ....

C. C. McCarty, brother-in-law of John E. Fisher, founder of Glen Arbor built a sawmill and an inn on the beach west of Glen Arbor in 1857. He called the settlement Sleeping Bearville and the inn was named Sleeping Bear House. McCarty built a dock at Glen Haven in 1865. The location of the dock in Sleeping Bear Bay offered a more protected harbor than some of the other docks in the area. McCarty also built a sawmill on Little Glen Lake where they used tugs to move logs from various parts of the lake to the sawmill and once the lumber was cut up, it was transferred to the Glen Haven dock by wagon or sled. By 1870, a tramway more than two miles long was built.

Glen Haven's development was slowed when many of the settlers left to fight in the Civil War, but accelerated again through the Homestead Act of 1862. P. P. Smith, a returning Union soldier became foreman for Northern Transit Company (NTC) at the Glen Haven cord wood station and later became Glen Haven postmaster.

In 1878, NTC President Philo Chamberlain acquired Glen Haven in order to assure a reliable supply of wood for a 24-vessel fleet providing service between Ogdensburg, NY and Chicago or Milwaukee. To serve as NTC's agent in Glen Haven, Chamberlain picked D. H. Day, his sister-in-law's younger brother. Before long, Day had bought most of NTC's properties including the village of Glen Haven. He also bought shares of two NTC steamers (Lawrence and Champlain).
 
The Glen Haven beach and dock were popular meeting places, and arrival of steamers was a festive occasion, with area citizens often coming by small boat to watch the docking. Another event prompting locals to get out on the beaches of Sleeping Bear Bay occurred when lumber was swept from ships and docks during storms. The wood was gathered to build many a home and barn.

When times were good for ship owners, the unloading of cargo at Glen Haven took twenty to thirty men about an hour. With expansion of trucking companies and improved highways, steamboat freight and passenger revenues fell sharply. The Glen Arbor stop was eliminated around 1918 and the pier allowed to deteriorate. Service continued to Glen Haven but by the late 1920s, there was little cargo and few passengers. Insolvency for operators of the steamships in 1931 brought the beginning of the end of Glen Haven's maritime role - and it's massive dock.

By the early 1920s D.H. Day had established the Glen Haven Canning Company on the shore near the dock. Day had established a farm and orchard south of Glen Haven where he had over 5,000 cherry and apple trees. The Canning Company processed the fruit and shipped it to market from the Glen Haven Dock. With improvements in the roads and rail service, the importance of the Glen Haven dock continued to decline until it was closed in 1931. Today the Cannery is used as a Great Lakes Boat Museum.


This is an old photo of the Glen Haven dock.

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Steamer at the Glen Haven dock.

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Steamer Puritan leaves Glen Haven for Chicago - about 1925.

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There was a railroad track that ran by the canning building and out on to the dock.

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This is all that is left of the Glen Haven dock today.

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This is the start of the canning building.

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#2 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2013 - 03:04 PM

Looks like a nice & fun project. I model HO scale trains. I always love the history behind these old buildings. That's part of the fun of modeling we get to capture that moment in history so others can enjoy. Thanks for sharing.

Jim


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#3 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2013 - 03:08 PM

Fascinating!


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#4 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2013 - 03:44 PM

Will be looking forward to the build. Roger.


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#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2013 - 05:48 PM

Great history of your new building, Ray! And good to hear from you again!


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#6 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2013 - 06:24 PM

Looking forward to the build.


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#7 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2013 - 11:46 AM

You do a nice job on these building models. Is this part of a railroad layout? Can we see the whole thing?


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#8 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2013 - 05:38 PM

You do a nice job on these building models. Is this part of a railroad layout? Can we see the whole thing?

I have been collecting and building things for O-scale trains for most of my life.

However, I do not have a layout started yet.

That is something that I plan on starting once we make this last move.



#9 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2013 - 05:45 PM

Love watching your builds :thumbs:


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#10 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted July 24, 2013 - 09:11 AM

Made up the ends of the building.

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Here are the support beams and floor joist under the office area.

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#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 25, 2013 - 08:14 PM

That is a great snap shot of your hobby. People on the outside have no clue how much research goes into a hobby like model railroading. I do because it is like that with my metal detecting hobby too.

Edited by JD DANNELS, July 25, 2013 - 08:15 PM.

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#12 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted July 26, 2013 - 05:32 AM

Looking good, Ray!


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#13 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted July 28, 2013 - 06:08 PM

Getting the roof made up with the trim around the outside glued on.

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#14 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted July 28, 2013 - 06:21 PM

That's going to be a great building, Ray!


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#15 MFDAC OFFLINE  

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Posted July 30, 2013 - 10:22 PM

The skill building this stuff is obviously over the top, but when it is combined with actual historical fact that makes it museum quality art in my opinion. I follow all of your builds, just don't get much time for commentary. Thanks for the 3D history lesson!

Later---DAC
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