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Dug Taters This Afternoon


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#16 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2013 - 06:47 PM

I have never had anything but bad luck with potatoes. Our soil is very rocky and when I tried hills we had a fungus. I like to see others successful with them. I'll have to figure out something to trade for potatoes in the future.Good Luck, Rick

Maybe you don't have to hill them? Yes I know we have been told to all my life and I have been one of the preachers of the practice.

Due to several things, like 'rain every day for two months and my not getting the hiller finished.

I never hilled mine this year?  I planted them 8-10 inches deep and I'm not sure not hilling made any difference?


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#17 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2013 - 06:50 PM

My FIL says billing is just wasting your time, he doesn't hill his.
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#18 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2013 - 06:57 PM

My FIL says billing is just wasting your time, he doesn't hill his.

He may be right.  The potatoes all form on the vine above the seed. Planting shallower in the past, I hilled to prevent the potatoes from coming above ground and sunburning. They tell me the green Chlorofil spots are poisonous.  Planting deep  I only saw one potato that was green like that. Another thing I noticed was that the seed I planted was intact and you would have never guessed it had been in the ground for months?


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#19 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2013 - 08:08 PM

the planting part seems to be different for all. I just drop them on the ground then I hill over them with a Suburban. I never have to dig down to get them out, as they are already at ground level.  most of the time you can just take your foot and shove the hill over and pick up the tators. I do a similar thing with onions


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#20 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2013 - 08:17 PM

I dug out a few plants last week for fresh eating. You can't beat the fresh from the garden, I remember my grandma planted fairly deep, as deep as the Troybilt furrow could dig. She always had a good crop. I just scratch a little row and the hill them. Usually I get decent results.


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#21 larryd OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2013 - 09:46 PM

JD nice taters . I like all kinds of taters even sweet taters fried, fries, candied but not baked

larryd

#22 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2013 - 10:28 PM

Thanks for the pic of your middle buster JD. I'v got what i need to build one for sure after seeing yours. I'v tried Yukons up here but they don't do good in my soil. We got the black gumbo type dirt and they like a sandier soil.



#23 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2013 - 11:28 PM

Thanks for the pic of your middle buster JD. I'v got what i need to build one for sure after seeing yours. I'v tried Yukons up here but they don't do good in my soil. We got the black gumbo type dirt and they like a sandier soil.

My place 8.9 acres is one big hill running down to a waterway. When I was in High School Ray Roush farmed this place.
He had about 16 acres he farmed but most of it was pasture. He made most of his living hauling stock to and from the sale barn.
In 1968 they subdivided the property and built a road to the back of the property. for about 1/8th mile they had to fill across the low spot. I think they cut all the fill off my place getting down into the clay. So my place is a combination of clay & loam.
The spot where I have been growing winter garlic is almost pure clay. I also plowed the garlic planted last september this morning.
I also have a patch of garlic planted this spring that will e coming out in the next week or so.
If the Yukons do not do well for you try something else. Kennebeck is the Old Reliable I rely on. Never have had a bad crop of those.

Edited by JD DANNELS, July 20, 2013 - 11:29 PM.

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#24 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2013 - 12:05 AM

Yes the kennebecks do well up here also. I'v been planting the pontiacs for some time now and really like the quantity i get.






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