Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Welder Question


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 30, 2013 - 12:34 PM

I have a Miller Thunderbolt AC welder. This welder went through the flood and was submerged for 6 days 3 yrs ago . I brought it to the garage and cleaned it up, took the cover off and blew it all out.
It looks to be in good shape?

Now is there a way and how do i check to see if there are any shorts before I plug it in.

I will have to take it into dads to test it since I do not have 220 in my garage. I would store it till i get a shop built with 220 service if it is ok. But if not I would like to sell it and use the money to buy a 110 volt wire machine that I can use. The alternative is to scrap it if it is no good.there is a lot of copper in it.

Edited by JD DANNELS, June 30, 2013 - 12:35 PM.

  • JRJ said thank you

#2 Amigatec OFFLINE  

Amigatec

    Collector of Rusty Junk

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5899
  • 2,023 Thanks
  • 3,172 posts
  • Location: Haskell Oklahoma

Posted June 30, 2013 - 12:40 PM

I would think if the water was clean, and it has sat for 3 years, it should be ok.
  • JD DANNELS said thank you

#3 glgrumpy OFFLINE  

glgrumpy

    Getting Out!

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 8360
  • 6,647 Thanks
  • 6,460 posts
  • Location: Huntington, IN 46750 North East in State

Posted June 30, 2013 - 12:42 PM

Three years! It outta be DRY by now!  Would think if shorted in flood any breaker in box would have tripped before any damage to appliance.  What about mud?  I see some floods have more mud than water in places when it's all down again. I'ld try it, but plug it in first, then turn breaker on at box. You'll be away from it then if problem. 


  • JD DANNELS said thank you

#4 olcowhand ONLINE  

olcowhand

    Red Tractor Nut & Diesel Addict

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Sponsor
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 20
  • 35,561 Thanks
  • 29,819 posts
  • Location: South Central Kentucky

Posted June 30, 2013 - 01:53 PM

All it will do is trip a breaker, and plugging it in is about the only way to know anyway.  It's highly unlikely anything was damaged, and if so, likely limited to the slippers being corroded if it has the rheostat type amperage adjuster.  I'd say you're good to go.


  • JD DANNELS said thank you

#5 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

KC9KAS
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10038
  • 4,777 Thanks
  • 4,302 posts
  • Location: Holland, IN

Posted June 30, 2013 - 01:55 PM

Agreed...You said you cleaned it out and it is dry....If something is wrong the breaker will trip.

Go for it!


  • JD DANNELS said thank you

#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 30, 2013 - 02:09 PM

River flood, yeah there was some mud. But the vents at the bottom and holes for feet in the base let the water drain out.
there was a little mud in the bottom I scraped it to loosen it and blew it out. The amp adjuster, the whole transformer runs up and down and after turning it up and down a couple time it works great. I took the air compressor and blew out everything I could get to.
It is probably cleaner than when I bought it used from the weld shop.

#7 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted June 30, 2013 - 03:25 PM

You'll just have to try it. If there is no obvious damage then there's a good chance it will be OK.  Any electronics should survive a brief dunking. As long as the circuit boards are clean and haven't corroded over time. 


  • JD DANNELS said thank you

#8 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

Ryan313

    PK Fanatic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 7087
  • 3,239 Thanks
  • 5,159 posts
  • Location: Wallkill, NY

Posted June 30, 2013 - 03:45 PM

I think you should let me burn a few pounds of rods with it first, make sure it works. :D
  • JD DANNELS and WNYTractorTinkerer have said thanks

#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 30, 2013 - 06:53 PM

I think you should let me burn a few pounds of rods with it first, make sure it works. :D

Well it is not a big box, but there is a lot of weight in that box. Shipping would be prohibitive?



#10 xshooter OFFLINE  

xshooter

    Member

  • Member
  • Member No: 2325
  • 34 Thanks
  • 93 posts
  • Location: Lone Tree IA

Posted June 30, 2013 - 08:27 PM

I wouldn't be in a hurry to buy a 110V welder. I know some have them and like them but in my experience they aren't good for much more than sheet metal.


  • JD DANNELS said thank you

#11 KennyP OFFLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,355 Thanks
  • 39,630 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted July 01, 2013 - 06:17 AM

I weld most everything with my 110V Hobart. If it's thicker than 1/4", I bevel and make 2 passes to fill it!


  • Alc and JD DANNELS have said thanks

#12 ol' stonebreaker OFFLINE  

ol' stonebreaker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 12515
  • 1,304 Thanks
  • 973 posts
  • Location: idaho

Posted July 01, 2013 - 06:36 AM

  If it's OK keep the Miller. I have a 220v 175 Miller mig and a A/C D/C thunderbolt. The stick welder doesn't get used very often but it has it's uses on anything above 1/4". Better to have it and use it whenever needed.

                                                     Mike


  • JD DANNELS said thank you

#13 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted July 01, 2013 - 08:09 AM

  If it's OK keep the Miller. I have a 220v 175 Miller mig and a A/C D/C thunderbolt. The stick welder doesn't get used very often but it has it's uses on anything above 1/4". Better to have it and use it whenever needed.

                                                     Mike

That is pretty much my intention. If I had known better when I bought the Miller I would have held out for an AC/DC unit.

I don't weld much and have avoided it. I am blind in one eye and since welding is hard on the eyes, have avoided risking the sight in the one good eye. My dad and a couple brothers are good welders. But now that I'm on the acreage, I find things needing repaired or want things made and it's a hassel to have to load things up and take them to town and find a time they are available to weld them for me. If I had a welder in the garage I could do the job in 15-20 minutes, instead of losing an hour or two hauling things around.

Like I said I do not have 220 in the garage so I will have to store the Miller till I get a shop built with a separate service to it with 220.

But it's already been stored for 3 yrs so a little longer won't hurt.

 

That being said, I worked for about 3 yrs in Maintainence in a factory and dabbled a bit. I had a friend who could weld anything, anytime anywhere. And he taught me to weld, Not on the overhead cranways :smilewink: we hung, but I think it would come back to me with a few hours of practice.


Edited by JD DANNELS, July 01, 2013 - 08:17 AM.


#14 Cvans ONLINE  

Cvans

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 5412
  • 4,469 Thanks
  • 5,005 posts
  • Location: Eastern SD.

Posted July 01, 2013 - 10:10 AM

Just like riding a bicycle again, you'll be a little wobbly at first and then your off and welding. 

Have fun and be safe.



#15 ol' stonebreaker OFFLINE  

ol' stonebreaker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 12515
  • 1,304 Thanks
  • 973 posts
  • Location: idaho

Posted July 01, 2013 - 10:03 PM

   Yes, JD, I understand the value of the one eye tho I still have both of mine. I finally had to get prescription glasses at age 45 to be able to see up close. Wow, after getting cheaters for my hood and torch goggles, I saw things in the puddle I hadn't seen for several yrs,LOL!! I don't think all the years of welding had anything to do w/ it as both my parents wore glasses as far back as I can remember. My personal opinion on the dangers to your one eye while welding is the grinding, chipping and torch work. I use a full face shield for all the grinding and chipping and good torch goggles for torching. I've never had anything get in my eyes while welding, even overhead.

               Hope this helps and eases some of the intimidation,

                                        Mike






Top