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#1 fedora OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 04:27 AM

Hello all,

 

I want a simple 3/4" roundover trim along my baseboards, and while pricing it, I found it was $0.50 per foot(unfinished)...I need alot of it, lol. I have a few questions...

 

Can I make this using a router and a roundover bit?

 

Do they make a roundover bit to do 3/4" stock, and what one would I need?

 

I have a table saw to make the 3/4"x3/4" stock, but I don't have a router...just a ball park figure tells me its going to be cheaper to buy a router and make my own, what do you think?

 

What I want looks like this...only using 3/4" x 3/4"...

 

http://www.lowes.com...=baseboard trim

 

Thanks

 



#2 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 05:38 AM

The profile you are showing in the link would require a large bit to do. To safely do that profile on a narrow piece like that you'd have to route the edge of a wider board then rip the piece off. You would need a minimum of a good 1/2" router, a sturdy router table and a bit that would do that profile vertically which would keep the diameter of the bit down. You pretty much need dust removal to do this as well, as a lot of dust is produced. It takes time to set it up and do the routing, which may need to be done in multiple passes. I've made some mouldings in the past but mostly with a small profile. It's time consuming and one slip up and you ruin a whole piece. This is particularly true if you don't have experience with routing.

  My advice would be to shop around to get the best price and buy what you need. Your time and money can then be put into the actual project. Try looking for a local millwork/moulding warehouse or commercial supplier. If you're buying a house lot it should be a lot cheaper there.


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#3 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 05:43 AM

I made the moulding for our kitchen this past year using a router and table saw like you want to do I'm not sure if it was any cheaper but got the profile I was looking for.Did you price out the woodstock you would be using ? The link you posted was oak so guessing oak , that's pretty $$$ .

#4 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 06:07 AM

I'm sure you'll spend more time and money getting set up to

do it yourself, safely.

As suggested, shop around. You should be able to do better than .50/ft  on

large qty.



#5 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 08:16 AM

You, can do it. I have made a number of picture frames doing just that.  If you buy a Router, be sure to get one that takes 1/2" shank bits. I did not on my first router. You also want one with varible speed, so you can slow the cutter down with larger cutters. The larger the diameter of the cutter greatly increases your surface Feet per minute. And if you exceed optimum you can burn the cutter.

Now if you do this, Don't cut small strips and then try to round them over. Use the whole board, cut your contour and then rip them off.

Much safer! And boards often have hidden stress and the narrow strips can warp, making them much harder to guide along the fence of the router table. I missed Brian's telling you the same thing.

The thing that drives the price of moulding up most is finding stock that is clear(no knots). Nothing more agrivating than working to get a piece right and having it break around a knot.

Woodworking is a great hobby and I would encourage anyone to pursue it. But If this is a one time deal, buying equipment and setting it up would exceed any savings over store bought as Will said.



#6 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 10:01 AM

Being a trim carpenter for over 30 years now the only trim I make is something I can't buy. The reasons are something existing I need to match or something custom. Just like mentioned because of the expense of tools needed, time setting up etc. you would be better off finding a good bulk price.



#7 dthomp17 ONLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 11:58 AM

I do woodworking as a hobby and I agree with all the previous comments.  I have made molding like that before and it is doable, but I would only recommend doing it if you already have the tools needed.  You can save a little money but probably not enough to justify buying a router and router bit for one project.  You absolutely do not want to rip small 3/4 pieces and then rout them.  Rout a wider board and then rip what you want.



#8 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 02:10 PM

I agree with all the other comments made previously.

 

One other point not mentioned is the length of stock you will be using.

 

Ideally, you will want to work with as long a piece as possible to minimize joints when installing.

 

Softwood trim can usually be purchased in lengths to 16'.  .....Hardwood trim is usually found in shorter lengths (at least in my area).

 

If you decide to make your own moldings, working with long lengths will require extra hands, or good stock support on both infeed & outfeed of your saw.

 

It can be done by you, but is it really worth it?  



#9 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 04:53 PM

Fedora, I to am a 25 yr + wood worker, BUY IT! search around, check your local lumber yard. Sometimes they can mill custom and still be cheaper than doing it yourself. The router they speak of 1/2" collet and variable speed is close to $300 for one of quality ( cheap tools produce cheap results) then the saw time, router bits, material choice ( something with no knots , ADDS up fast.)

 

There is one other option if your hell bent on doing it yourself. Sears used to sell a moulding cutter for the table saw. It has various cutters available which should include that profile. Here's the ISSUE, it may be cheaper than a router, but you must be careful and take all the proper precautions, or you can get hurt. So too with the router method.

 

I don't want to completely discourage you, try it, BE SAFE, but in the end it will be pride that you did it yourself, not savings.

Tom



#10 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 05:38 PM

I too have done some woodworking, and own the equipment to do the work you speak of, but all posts above mine tell the same story.

It can be done, you can do it, but what will the total expense be.......



#11 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 09:14 PM

Or, you could go about this project, in a totally different way.

 

If you don't finish the baseboards, the building inspector can't close off

the building permit, and therefore, the assessment office won't be along

to reassess your house. Your taxes won't go up, and you'll have

saved enough to buy another GT. :smilewink:

 

For the wife of course, to smooth over the whole baseboard issue. :smilewink:



#12 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2013 - 09:14 PM

If you're doing your whole house yourself in new trim, buy the router and make a table for it with scrap lumber and a short piece of formica countertop.

 

Any amount of work less than that, keep shopping for a supplier.

 

I did an 1,800 square foot, 3 level home (base, windows, and doors) with a Craftsman 3.5 hp Industrial with a 3/4" Roman Ogee bit:

 

image_15007.jpg

 

I used #2 1x4 pine for the whole darn thing. Saved a ton of money and it looked really nice with the Golden Oak Minwax stain.

6-26-05 005.jpg kayla 1st day of school 020.jpg



#13 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted June 29, 2013 - 05:54 AM

A cheap Craftsman router is $100+. A bit like that is $25 and up. $50 - $100 for a router table. How much is your labor worth?



#14 fedora OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2013 - 02:01 AM

Hello all,

 

I appreciate all the advice, and I'll keep shopping around for moulding...the next place that carries any is 60 miles from here, I'll take a ride up tomorrow morning. As far as the quantity, I need molding for the whole house...upstairs, main floor, and basement, I need alot,lol. As far as what my labor is worth? I just spent 2 weeks chemically stripping 2 stories worth of hardwood floors on my hands and knees, lol, I'll start sanding tomorrow.

 

I always prefer to do it myself, unless it is very cost prohibitive...which it seems this would be. I tend to be a perfectionist when it comes to my home and equipment...Not totally anal about everything, but I like to pick up new skills and learn to do it myself. I have most of the tools to set up a "starter" woodshop, I just never got a router, I never needed one until now.

 

After reading all of your replies and doing a little research, I'll be purchasing unfinished moulding.

 

Anybody know of a good online retailer with reasonable shipping rates? The local shop is $0.50 per foot, I'll check out lowes in the morning, after that, there is a "hard wood superstore" I pass on I-80 on the way to Pittsburgh I can plan a trip to.


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#15 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2013 - 07:27 AM

Why not call ahead or check their internet site for prices?






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