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My 2013 Garden Update


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#1 bigcountry48 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 18, 2013 - 08:42 PM

I've pulled several pounds of potatoes, and have more than half left. I have pulled 7 squash, 4 bell pepper, a gallon of bush beans, 6 onions, and a cucumber I didn't realize I had planted! I hope next year I can downsize and keep this grass under control so I'll have a larger give back, but as for my first garden I'm pleased with it.

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#2 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted June 19, 2013 - 06:23 AM

Looks good a first year garden always looks bad. You need to haul in some poop, cow, goat, or chicken is best. Also grass, leaves, or straw will help to loosen it and will provide better drainage. Mine is like a bathtub, where the garden is it is nice and loose, but around the outside, it is hard as a rock. It took me about 3 years to finally get the tiller all the way down as deep as it will go.

I have added a LOT of grass and leaves to it. This fall watch for people who rake up and bag their leaves. Most if the time they will let haul them them home and work them in. A lot of landfills don't want to waste space with a bunch of leaves and grass clippings. Also you might talk to the tree trimmers in your area, a lot of the time they will be willing to dump the wood chips in your yard. If you are on a rural electric COOP, you can ask them about the wood chips. That's how my FIL gets his.

It takes wood chips 3 or 4 years to break down, when they turn black and crumbly they are ready to spread on the garden. They should have a nice earthy smell it them.
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#3 LarryB OFFLINE  

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Posted June 19, 2013 - 09:35 AM

A word of caution on hauling in compost.  Invasive spieces can be brought in very easy.  Be very fussy what you bring in.  Good compost which has gone thru the heat cycle will usaualy kill most seeds which may be in this mix. 

After putting down or working in compost keep your eye open for unfamiliar plants that may sprout.  Best to just knock these on the head.  Up here (Chedder Head land) one of the worst is Garlic Mustard.  Read up on this invasive species.  You do not want this fellow around!


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#4 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted June 19, 2013 - 09:47 AM

In the fall I can drive around neighborhoods and just pick up the paper sack's full of leaves. Run them through the chipper and directly onto the garden. I hope to get enough this year to put a 2"-3" layer on the garden.



#5 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted June 19, 2013 - 10:55 AM

A word of caution on hauling in compost.  Invasive spieces can be brought in very easy.  Be very fussy what you bring in.  Good compost which has gone thru the heat cycle will usaualy kill most seeds which may be in this mix. 
After putting down or working in compost keep your eye open for unfamiliar plants that may sprout.  Best to just knock these on the head.  Up here (Chedder Head land) one of the worst is Garlic Mustard.  Read up on this invasive species.  You do not want this fellow around!


I agree after a few loads of cow poop from the stock yards, I had quite a collection of weeds I had never seen before. One corner was covered in Pigweed, I have most of it gone now. It just takes work.
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#6 CADplans OFFLINE  

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Posted June 19, 2013 - 11:45 AM

A word of caution on hauling in compost.  Invasive spieces can be brought in very easy.  Be very fussy what you bring in.  Good compost which has gone thru the heat cycle will usaualy kill most seeds which may be in this mix. 

 

I suffered with every weed in the book.A decade or so ago I even tried chemical weed killer. It was only temporary help.

 

Last year we SMOTHERED the garden with compost. I am convinced we killed many of the weeds with just sheer volume.

 

DSC_00161024x523.jpg

 

Last year we had NO weeds, this year we have only had 1% of the usual weeds.

I wonder what next year has in store for us!?  :oh_shucks:

 

We may end up with more weeds than ever!!  :biting_nails:

 

All I know is, if I ever add compost again, it will be one foot deep, minimum. We are happy, right now. No more 1-2 inch additions.

 

I think the 1-2 inch additions promotes the weeds.

 

If I have limited compost, I will only do a small area.

 

The soil is tremendous!! :thumbs:


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