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Slick 50 In Your Engines.


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#1 hamman ONLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2013 - 11:41 AM

I have been using Slick 50 in my Homelite ever since I got it after dad passed away. I add some every oil change and it is due again. I don't use a lot but about a pint. I am going to use it in all of my other small engines. I believe it works and has done me a good service. I also was told to use Restore in the older engines and it will help in filling in cylinder walls. Now I have used Restore in all my vehicles and have noticed a differance. I had a Jeep Cherokee that had over 200,000 miles on it and it made a great difference. Just wondering. Roger.


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#2 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2013 - 12:05 PM

I have never tried Slick 50, but the Restore I have been using and put it to the test years ago. I had a Z28 that the motor was getting tired and before I built the new engine I tried Restore. There was a huge difference in performance when I added that to the oil, And It would last for a while unless I really abused the engine.


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#3 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2013 - 12:28 PM

I had a 350 motor in an old GMC that I ran low on oil and had a knock in it. Well I added Slick 50 to and the knock went away, and the fuel mileage went from 11 mpg to 13. Made a believer out of me.
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#4 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2013 - 01:22 PM

I had a 350 motor in an old GMC that I ran low on oil and had a knock in it. Well I added Slick 50 to and the knock went away, and the fuel mileage went from 11 mpg to 13. Made a believer out of me.

And to be the other side of the coin...
I had a 1975 Dodge Coronet with the 318. It had 75000 miles on it.
I did the oil change and added slick 50
Drove the 17 miles to work, and by the time I got there, it was acting like the choke was on.
Mileage dropped in half and the engine lost all its power.
Flushed engine, flushed fuel, did a carb rebuild, finally ended up putting a different engine in the vehicle.
Will never use the product again, glad others have better luck with it.
Reslone or restore are decent products in my book. IMHO
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#5 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2013 - 02:09 PM

Look at Best-line for the good stuff :thumbs:

 

Below is a link to some testing of Slick 50 and a few others

 


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#6 Canawler OFFLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2013 - 02:42 PM

That video is of a Timken EP bearing test.  It's designed to test gear lubes with extreme pressure additives and has no correlation to the type of wear seen in an engine.  It's not designed to test motor oils but you can find youtube videos of just about every brand out there beating every other brand.  Supposedly the trick is how and when the extra weight is placed on the arm.

Either way, try regular household bleach with this test.  It beats all the oil additives hands down. 


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#7 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2013 - 02:53 PM

That video is of a Timken EP bearing test.  It's designed to test gear lubes with extreme pressure additives and has no correlation to the type of wear seen in an engine.  It's not designed to test motor oils but you can find youtube videos of just about every brand out there beating every other brand.  Supposedly the trick is how and when the extra weight is placed on the arm.

Either way, try regular household bleach with this test.  It beats all the oil additives hands down. 

Agreed, years ago I remember the Wynn's guy using that machine in our shop, selling Wynn's friction proofing products.


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#8 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2013 - 10:55 PM

And the engine manufaturers recommend that you ad NO additives to the oil on new engines. I don't ever remember seeing an additive that they did recommended ever. Any ideas why?



#9 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted June 13, 2013 - 11:14 PM

And the engine manufaturers recommend that you ad NO additives to the oil on new engines. I don't ever remember seeing an additive that they did recommended ever. Any ideas why?

Could it be that worn engines equal revenue in dealer repair shops, and, or new cars bought???

 

Smitty


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#10 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2013 - 08:07 AM

Cvans, on 13 Jun 2013 - 10:55 PM, said:snapback.png

And the engine manufaturers recommend that you ad NO additives to the oil on new engines. I don't ever remember seeing an additive that they did recommended ever. Any ideas why?

Could it be that worn engines equal revenue in dealer repair shops, and, or new cars bought???

 

Smitty

 

He just said it refered to a NEW engine.

 

 

It could be that additives interfer with the break in process.....   or maybe it means the engineers feel they don't work, maybe.



#11 Utah Smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2013 - 08:50 AM

 

Cvans, on 13 Jun 2013 - 10:55 PM, said:snapback.png

Could it be that worn engines equal revenue in dealer repair shops, and, or new cars bought???

 

Smitty

 

He just said it refered to a NEW engine.

 

 

It could be that additives interfer with the break in process.....   or maybe it means the engineers feel they don't work, maybe.

 

Well, I missed the "new"... anyone that knows anything about an engine knows you should break it in first... I still maintain that there is a profit motive in "recommendations" from car manufacturers... not to mention planned obsolescence.  I could sit on the fender of our '62 Chevy or '68 GMC and work on the engine.  I also could repair or replace just about anything on the truck.

 

Vehicles today are more reliable overall, but much more expensive to diagnose and repair.  I have a '99 Nissan Altima that had 70,000 miles on it when I bought it. Within a month of getting it, it started stalling on me, or didn't have any power.  It's OBD-II, so I plugged in my code reader... no faults.  I changed the fuel filter just to be sure... no change.

 

I wrestled with this for a couple months until an old-hand mechanic in my neighborhood told me to replace the mass air-flow sensor. He also warned against getting a refurbished one from Checker or Auto Zone.  It's basically a plastic pipe with a resistance wire and a few electronic components... all for a measly $400. I bought a used one for $85 and it's been working fine. I could have paid a fortune to an auto dealership to diagnose that if they relied on their analyzers, etc.

 

Another example:  A friend's Ford truck is a diesel. If an injector goes out, it's almost $1000 plus installation EACH.

 

Smitty



#12 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted June 14, 2013 - 10:31 AM

   I've had good luck with Rislone for noisy lifters. Run STP in all my small engines after a Tecumseh seized three times because of a broken oil pump and basically no damage to the engine. Marvel mystery oil in my air tools and I've read that it is great for removing carbon in 2 cycle engines when added to the gas. Seafoam seems to have a good following and I have had a good first hand experience with their transmission additive. 

   The rest of the stuff is fun to read about but I guess I haven't had a need to use them. Some do sound a little too good to be true. 


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#13 fedora OFFLINE  

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Posted June 15, 2013 - 12:51 PM

I've heard they have a class action suit against them for false claims, but I could be wrong,,,I've used it before, but never noticed ant dramatic changes. Now, the only thing I add to the crankcase is oil...fuel is a differnt thing, I do the seafoam and marine stabil to every gallon.






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