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Utility Trailer Flooring,what's Your Choice?


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#1 pigsitter OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 08:52 AM

As you can tell by the picture my trailer is in need of a new floor but I am confused as to what to use.The original untreated floor lasted about 5 years before it rotted out.As of right now I'm trying to decide between treated or untreated lumber plus I've been trying to find a local mill that I might get some rough sawn white oak from but have had zero luck so far. Because of my troubles finding a mill I'm leaning towards using treated lumber but I've read the chemicals used in the treating will corrode the trailer frame,has anyone here had or seen this happen? If nothing else I may go back with untreated lumber and either paint it or water seal it before installation. Any input is greatly appreciated as I need to get my trailer back in action!

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#2 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 09:03 AM

If your trailer is still as pictured  with slight rust on the crossmembers I would brush on some POR 15 and use pressure treated lumber ,  We use rough sawed oak for the back-hoe trailers and it doesn't last very long , unless  someone has a way to persevere it ?  


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#3 Guest_gravely-power_*

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 09:06 AM

If your trailer is still as pictured  with slight rust on the crossmembers I would brush on some POR 15 and use pressure treated lumber ,  We use rough sawed oak for the back-hoe trailers and it doesn't last very long , unless  someone has a way to persevere it ?  

One of my trailers has oak flooring. It's 10 years old. I treated it with old crankcase oil mixed with kerosene.


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#4 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 09:16 AM

I had good luck with deck paint on the wood floor of my flatbed truck. It lasted 20 years but, I repainted every couple years. Good Luck, Rick
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#5 Grumpy ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 09:26 AM

I used untreated pine and treated with used motor oil. I let sit out in the hot sun before I treated it. Now once a year I do the top.

The floor has been on for 5 years and is still in good shape.


Edited by Grumpy, June 07, 2013 - 09:26 AM.

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#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 09:55 AM

I wish I knew what to reccommend. I think untreated pine or local mill run treated  with oil, be it linseed or used oil might be best??

I have found that the Treated lumber is not cured very well and must be recycled waste(Tops with twisted grain).

The last bunch of 2X10 treated lumber, that I hand selected for straightness and few flaws was fine sitting on the floor of my shed.

But as soon as I made ramps so I could drive the GT into the Shed and were exposed to weather.

They twisted up like corkscrews??


Edited by JD DANNELS, June 07, 2013 - 09:57 AM.

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#7 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 11:03 AM

In this area rough sawn hemlock is used for bridge decking and a couple guys have put in on their trailers as decking as well, it is a soft wood like pine so not so good if you have a crawler with aggressive cleats on the tracks.  A good soaking in boiled linseed oil/paint thinner @ 75/25 is my preferred "treatment" for exposed decking/flooring.


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#8 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 04:57 PM

We did treated 2x8's about 4 yrs ago and haven't seen any corrosive effect... But we did put under coating on the cross members and frame where the old boards had rubbed the paint off.
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#9 pigsitter ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 06:25 PM

Thanks for all the input guys,hopefully if all goes well I'll be able to get started back on this project in the next week or so. I've got to say my experience with treated boards has been the same as JD DANNELS as I have a couple of 2x10's out in the shop that are warped pretty bad just from laying flat on the floor.They're not twisted but warped lengthwise on the 2" side.



#10 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 06:55 PM

Won't an oil treated trailer floor get slick when it gets wet?????



#11 CADplans ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 07:31 PM

I have had this one over ten years, steel floor, probably 1/8" thick.

 

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Super floor!! Weight-wise, I would bet it is less than wet wood!! It is a tad durable!!  :dancingbanana:


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#12 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 07:39 PM

Won't an oil treated trailer floor get slick when it gets wet?????


More so with dimensional lumber, rough cut... Not so much.
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#13 TomLGT195 ONLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 07:46 PM

Por 15 the metal, that's a great start. If you choose pressure treated, go with narrower boards, pt is usually made with lower grade lumber so the narrower have less tendency to twist. If you bolt it down good it will prevent some or most twisting. 2x8 should be fine. Let it season a year then I would do the linseed/ mineral spirit treatment. (Don't forget the bottom, use a pressure sprayer to give it a good soak )
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#14 Captain_Sparrow OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 08:09 PM

Boiled linseed oil was used on wooden boats back in the day. They lasted a looking time under worse conditions than your trailer will see.

#15 NJKen OFFLINE  

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Posted June 07, 2013 - 09:59 PM

My vote is white oak. But as you've said you can find any local mills to get it. I actually put a "items wanted" ad on Craigslist when I was looking for some.
Paid off, I got a few responses and wound up buying mine from a small mill in PA.

My second choice would be PT pine.

I bought some PT 2x12's at Lowes a few months ago and it was real nice compared to the twisted sister stuff HD was selling. Lowes stuff was darn near dry too.

I'd use 2 x 8's or smaller for trailer decking. Wider stuff will cup and split easier IMO.

Now get your a$$ moving and get it done. How long have you been going to do this ? ImageUploadedByTapatalk1370660215.555755.jpg

And for those asking if an oiled trailer deck is slippery, surprisingly it's not. At least on my trailer it isn't. Once I hauled a few loads of firewood, it was fine. Guess if you kept it spotless and well oiled all the time, it might be.
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