Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Steering Wheel Repair


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Sawdust OFFLINE  

Sawdust
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 36549
  • 4,523 Thanks
  • 2,831 posts
  • Location: Butler, Kentucky

Posted June 04, 2013 - 09:58 AM

I just pulled my SW off my MF12 as part of my restore. I want to fix these cracks. The SW is solid & doesn't flex at all. I'm thinking maybe using JB Weld mixed a little thin or heated slightly to get deep into the cracks. Any other ideas? Thanks

 

 

Attached Thumbnails

  • ref18.jpg


#2 Captain_Sparrow OFFLINE  

Captain_Sparrow
  • Member
  • Member No: 32281
  • 53 Thanks
  • 46 posts
  • Location: Smoky Mtns

Posted June 04, 2013 - 10:08 AM

JB weld wouldn't need to be heated for splits like that. Also, heating it would make it set up too fast. Personally, I would use a two part epoxy with some micro balloon thickener. It will be much easier to sand smooth and recreate the shape without damaging what's there.
  • Sawdust and OkieGt have said thanks

#3 LilysDad ONLINE  

LilysDad

    Cat Lover

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 10443
  • 9,668 Thanks
  • 7,686 posts
  • Location: N. Illinois, DeKalb County

Posted June 04, 2013 - 10:21 AM

What was the original material of these old SWs? Rubber? Plastic? Bakelite? Just wondering.



#4 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,458 Thanks
  • 6,625 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted June 04, 2013 - 10:36 AM

I've have had good luck with those 2 part plastic epoxys that they sell in the auto parts store , they flow pretty good and can be sanded when hard , good luck and lets us know what you did and how it came out (  I need to do the  same thing to my PK )


  • Sawdust said thank you

#5 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 04, 2013 - 11:51 AM

Way back when I first joined this group, someone on the Bolens section had used Bondo to repair the cracks, repainted and you could not see tht it was not a new wheel.


  • Alc said thank you

#6 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,315 Thanks
  • 28,632 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted June 04, 2013 - 05:06 PM

I would think any of the good 2 part epoxy stuff would fill in.
May want to do it in 2 doses instead of one big blop to fight with.

We have used JB weld before with decent results. Either fill and smooth or Put tape on the outside and drizzle it in from the top slow. Try to avoid air pockets either way.
  • Alc said thank you

#7 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

Bolens 1000

    DR. Bolens

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 7
  • 12,701 Thanks
  • 17,208 posts
  • Location: Western NY

Posted June 04, 2013 - 05:08 PM

Way back when I first joined this group, someone on the Bolens section had used Bondo to repair the cracks, repainted and you could not see tht it was not a new wheel.

 

I think that was me :D

But they were only small cracks I filled, not big chunks so I cannt say how well it would hold over a large repair area.

The one that I repaired is about 3-4 years old now and is still holding strong and no sign of cracking.



#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 04, 2013 - 05:29 PM

I think that was me :D
But they were only small cracks I filled, not big chunks so I cannt say how well it would hold over a large repair area.
The one that I repaired is about 3-4 years old now and is still holding strong and no sign of cracking.


I was pretty sure it was you, but did not want to give credit to the wrong person so did not drop names.
I was impressed with the way it worked.
  • Bolens 1000 said thank you

#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted June 04, 2013 - 05:35 PM

Another thought and not something most would think of. When I built my muzzleloader I poured the nose cap from pewter.
It melts at a low temp and did not burn my cherry stock. It is much like working with lead. You would have to dam up the crack to pour it. But you can easily shape it with a file.

#10 MFGray OFFLINE  

MFGray

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 154
  • 129 Thanks
  • 122 posts
  • Location: Cambridge, Ontario

Posted June 04, 2013 - 06:04 PM

I think the steering wheel material is ABS plastic. I have a steering wheel that was similar - but worse. The cracks at the centre went right through and a large chunk had come completely away. It had been glued with some sort of white glue that had turned brittle and looked bad. I broke the glued portion off again and prised the glue off the pieces. Then put the pieces back together, drillled two oblique 3/16 holes and pegged the piece in place with two short lengths of drill rod.

 

To hide the ends of the holes and fill up the cracks (and gaps where bits were missing completely), I dissolved a couple of broken up 2 inch black ABS plumbing collars in acetone to a consistency of treacle and painted the stuff into the cracks. It dissolves itself into the existing plastic and if a thin layer is applied the acetone evaporates leaving the ABS behind. Repeated thin layers that can dry out is best. If you put down too much the acetone takes a long time to evaporate and leaves small bubble cavities behind which you can see as pinholes when the thing is sanded back into shape. One collar would have done, I still have most of it left.

 

It doesn't do a perfect job, and I believe it is not quite as strong as the original plastic, but it is hard to see where the cracks or holes were and if you spend a little time over it I think it can look quite good.


  • Alc and twostep have said thanks

#11 MFDAC OFFLINE  

MFDAC

    Only member from Western South Dakota!

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 5815
  • 2,034 Thanks
  • 1,127 posts
  • Location: East of Rapid City, SD in Rapid Valley

Posted June 05, 2013 - 09:19 PM

 

I just pulled my SW off my MF12 as part of my restore. I want to fix these cracks. The SW is solid & doesn't flex at all. I'm thinking maybe using JB Weld mixed a little thin or heated slightly to get deep into the cracks. Any other ideas? Thanks

 
Hi Sawdust, I had to do an extensive repair to my MF12 steering wheel, but it is a 1975 and had the rubberish coated one so can't help there. What I my be able to help with is the wheel of my '55 GMC I repaired last January. I was in a hurry as the truck had to get out of the shop so it was a quickie, and maybe I will re-do it later, maybe not!-LOL

When I was sanding the steering wheel down to fill the cracks and paint, I recognized the smell, but still don't know what to call that plastic or resin. The smell was the same as when I would drill a bowling ball when I worked an a bowling alley as a kid.

Anyway, I just used standard JB weld like you were thinking, no heat or thinning. I just tried to press it into the cracks like greasing a wheel bearing till it started flowing out of other parts of the crack and let it overfill some.
I drive it almost every day and it still looks the same but it wasn't a perfect resto anyway.

Here are some pics, before during and after.

Later---DAC

Attached Thumbnails

  • 1955 GMC 001.jpg
  • dash dent and paint work 033.jpg
  • dash dent and paint work 041.jpg
  • dash dent and paint work 047.jpg

  • olcowhand, MH81, Alc and 2 others have said thanks

#12 Sawdust OFFLINE  

Sawdust
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 36549
  • 4,523 Thanks
  • 2,831 posts
  • Location: Butler, Kentucky

Posted June 06, 2013 - 09:42 PM

 
 
Hi Sawdust, I had to do an extensive repair to my MF12 steering wheel, but it is a 1975 and had the rubberish coated one so can't help there. What I my be able to help with is the wheel of my '55 GMC I repaired last January. I was in a hurry as the truck had to get out of the shop so it was a quickie, and maybe I will re-do it later, maybe not!-LOL

When I was sanding the steering wheel down to fill the cracks and paint, I recognized the smell, but still don't know what to call that plastic or resin. The smell was the same as when I would drill a bowling ball when I worked an a bowling alley as a kid.

Anyway, I just used standard JB weld like you were thinking, no heat or thinning. I just tried to press it into the cracks like greasing a wheel bearing till it started flowing out of other parts of the crack and let it overfill some.
I drive it almost every day and it still looks the same but it wasn't a perfect resto anyway.

Here are some pics, before during and after.

Later---DAC

 

 
 
Hi Sawdust, I had to do an extensive repair to my MF12 steering wheel, but it is a 1975 and had the rubberish coated one so can't help there. What I my be able to help with is the wheel of my '55 GMC I repaired last January. I was in a hurry as the truck had to get out of the shop so it was a quickie, and maybe I will re-do it later, maybe not!-LOL

When I was sanding the steering wheel down to fill the cracks and paint, I recognized the smell, but still don't know what to call that plastic or resin. The smell was the same as when I would drill a bowling ball when I worked an a bowling alley as a kid.

Anyway, I just used standard JB weld like you were thinking, no heat or thinning. I just tried to press it into the cracks like greasing a wheel bearing till it started flowing out of other parts of the crack and let it overfill some.
I drive it almost every day and it still looks the same but it wasn't a perfect resto anyway.

Here are some pics, before during and after.

Later---DAC

Sounds like a good plan on the SW. That dashboard is awesome! Thanks.


  • MFDAC said thank you

#13 MFDAC OFFLINE  

MFDAC

    Only member from Western South Dakota!

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 5815
  • 2,034 Thanks
  • 1,127 posts
  • Location: East of Rapid City, SD in Rapid Valley

Posted June 06, 2013 - 10:13 PM

 

Sounds like a good plan on the SW. That dashboard is awesome! Thanks.


I forgot to say that I cleaned the cracks real good with brake and parts cleaner and blew them out with compressed air first. Didn't do any sanding on it at all till the JB weld had set up. If I would have had 2 more days, the evidence of the cracks you can see in the finished pic would not be visible. I would have given the repaired areas a couple more coat and sand repeats with high fill rustoleum spray bomb primer. Incidentally all the fresh paint you see is spray bombs or brushed. All the satin black is Krylon and the ivory and greenish blue is brushed sign painters enamel. Thanks for the compliment!

Later---DAC
  • Alc and twostep have said thanks

#14 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

JBRamsey
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 61995
  • 973 Thanks
  • 587 posts
  • Location: North Carolina

Posted April 12, 2015 - 10:58 PM

I had a weather checked and cracked steering wheel on a B Model Allis Chalmers. I cleaned it good with a red scotchbrite pad and dish soap and started going at it with bondo. It took a lot of sanding to get all of the finger grips back and then I sprayed it semigloss black. It looks great. I don't know what it will do long term, but it's holding up so far.




Top