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Rolled Some Dirt This Evening

garen plow sears

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#31 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted June 04, 2013 - 12:35 PM

Pole beans will not climb horizontal wire.  Peas will, because they have tendrils that grab almost anything while he vine grows straight.  Pole beans wrap the vine around what they are climbing, and won't grow horizontally.  You need vertical poles, string, or wire for pole beans.

Well for two years I used 2X4 fencing for the peas and pole beans and it worked well except for cleaning at the end of the season.

I have gone to livestock panels this year. heavier and easier to clean. See my Arch Of Beans thread.

It takes a little training to get them started up the fence then they climb without a problem.

As you say they don't follow the horizontal wire but climb the verticals.

Sure is a lot nicer than tearing up the back stooping to pick beans!! Seems as I get older I find it more difficult to get back Up.

What's up with that??


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#32 Craig. OFFLINE  

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Posted June 05, 2013 - 10:36 PM

Looks like good dirt. Enjoy.

Edited by BaumBaum, June 05, 2013 - 10:37 PM.


#33 TAHOE ONLINE  

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Posted June 10, 2013 - 12:15 PM

:mad2:  :wallbanging:  :shoot3:  :cowboy_shooter:

 

 

DEER!!!! Eatin my beans, time for the electric fence to go up :thumbs:



#34 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted June 10, 2013 - 04:08 PM

If they don't pay any mind to the fence, take yesterday's socks and hang on it.

There is also a product called hot pepper wax that make most plants unpalatable to deer and other grazers for a short term.
http://www.hotpepper...oducts/FAQ.html

Colorado extension office has this on their website:
A spray of 20 percent whole eggs and 80 percent water is one of the most effective repellents. To prevent the sprayer from clogging, remove the chalaza or white membrane attached to the yolk before mixing the eggs. The egg mixture is weather resistant but must be reapplied in about 30 days. See Table 2 for a list of commercially available repellents and their ratings against deer and elk browsing in Colorado.

http://www.ext.colos...tres/06520.html
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#35 TAHOE ONLINE  

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Posted June 10, 2013 - 04:42 PM

Heard of the hot pepper. Won't take long to string up some wire, I've got a bunch of the plastic posts that just push in the ground.

Got plenty of eggs, maybe I can break a few and just wipe them around on the fences. :D



#36 CADplans OFFLINE  

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Posted June 10, 2013 - 11:04 PM

It took a few gardens to evolve to this one, We have more than our fair share of deer.

 

We found the electric fence became inoperative when the ground dried up. No electrical connection if dry.

 

Sloped aprons coming up to the fence on all sides- deer do not like to jump off a slope.

 

Woven wire topped with barbless "barb wire" supporting the woven wire.

 

4x4's on 5 foot centers

 

2x6 around the bottom - stops small animals.

 

Oh, yea, did I say we take our garden seriously!??  :bigrofl:

 

 

fence_zps190b2c70.jpg


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#37 TAHOE ONLINE  

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Posted June 11, 2013 - 08:33 AM

Wow, yep you are serious!!

Was out there last night trimming some overhanging tree limbs, no evidence they have been back. I took all the tree limbs and slipped them into the fence making it like a hedge where they were jumping and coming in, maybe that will deter them a little till I can get some wire up. New neighbors are working rehabbing and older small house near the garden area, maybe help keeping them away.

I'll run both a hot and ground around the perimeter if I need to, then they should get zapped if the rub up against both at same time.



#38 TAHOE ONLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2013 - 09:37 AM

Here's a hap-hazard pic I snapped this morning w/ phone while feeding chickens, I guess you can get the idea. The tree trimming I did couple weeks ago really helped out.

I could get fence stretched as tight as I wanted, but I think it will work for the beans. Once you get feelers grabbed on, they really take off up the fence. Few tomatoes are starting to ripen even though they are small right now.

Got to run small tiller through to knock down weeds/do some sprayin' and most of my work will be done,.... mom, sister and wifey gets to do most of pickin'.  :smilewink: .

 

 

garden.jpg

 

 

 


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#39 twostep OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2013 - 09:50 AM

It's amazing how plants TAKE OFF when they get what they need. We went  couple of weeks with no rain after I planted, I watered and kept everything alive but in the last couple of weeks we have gotten some rain and my plants have tripled in size!



#40 TAHOE ONLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2013 - 12:11 PM

Yea, heard that. The back row of beans were kind of sparse, about half the row didn't grow because of the shade. I trimmed the trees, sister replanted maybe a week/ week and half ago and they are already 3-4" tall.



#41 CADplans OFFLINE  

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Posted June 21, 2013 - 01:10 PM

Most gardeners I meet that have negative comments about their garden try to act like farmers.

 

Plant

 

Fertilize

 

Cultivate

 

Harvest

 

I treat gardening differently, heck, my garden is 1/10 acre, not 100 acres

 

Fertilize

 

Plant

 

Fertilize

 

Fertilize

 

Fertilize

 

Cultivate

 

Fertilize

 

Fertilize

 

Harvest

 

So it cost me $10 more in fertilizer, everybody comes by and is shocked by what we grow.

 

My time is worth $10, I will never let the garden go more than two weeks without fertilizer.

 

Thank you PlantTone!!  :thumbs:


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#42 bja105 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 22, 2013 - 06:45 AM

Cadplans, how are you applying the fertilizer to established plants?



#43 CADplans OFFLINE  

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Posted June 22, 2013 - 09:29 PM

Cadplans, how are you applying the fertilizer to established plants?

I apply it by hand, toss it at the root area. With the number of times I fertilize, each application does not have to be much.

 

The entire garden gets about two gallons per application. I use the Espoma products and http://milorganite.com/

 

I have never been able to over apply to the point I have seen a negative effect.


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#44 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 23, 2013 - 07:08 AM

I have been using tomato tone and plant tone but never thought to fertilize every 2 weeks.  The first time I tried it, I had 2 rows of bush beans.  I spread handfulls next to one row, on each side and scratched it in a little with one of these little hand held garden tools.  A couple of weeks later, this row was twice as tall and much fuller than the other row.  The next year, I bought a huge bag.  I have been using it when I plant and then again, weeks later.  I think I will tripple up and do it more often and see what happens.


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#45 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted June 23, 2013 - 08:43 AM

I hardly ever use granular fertilizer on my garden, but then I have access to all the manure & bedding material one could want for natural fertilizer which I apply in the off season.  


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