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Recommended Tire Chains

tires chains traction pulling

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#1 skinnison OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 07:28 AM

Hello all,

 

This is my first post/time using this forum. Forgive me if I am missing something or am ignorant to how the site runs, I don't want to waste peoples time!

 

I recently was given a 2002 (I think but can't seem to locate the date of manufacturing) Craftsman GT3000, (48" blade, 23HP Kohler Pro V Twin). The former owner (my good friend) was fed up with it. Luckily my father was a small engine mechanic for years and last weekend we spent about 5 hours on it and it runs perfect other then I need to have the choke out a bit at all times. This may improve as I run it more, (it had been sitting in a barn for two years).

 

At any rate, I am looking to purchase tire chains and had a few questions. I have poked around the forum and am having difficulty finding the right info.

 

I have taken the deck off and will be using the tractor primarily for hauling wood, dirt, rocks etc.... I live in New Hampshire on approximately 3 acres of land. The majority of my yard is wooded and somewhat flat. I will be taking down trees, cutting them up and hauling them up to my driveway area to my wood stack. This will require going up a small hill approximately 20-30ft long and a moderate grade. I also have a few other small hills in the yard that I need to get over. I currently have 23 x 10.5-12 Carlise Turf-savers on which are spinning on me, even on the small hills without hauling anything.

 

I was thinking of getting 2" spaced heavy duty V-bars for maximum grip however I will be on my paved driveway some of the time. The driveway is relatively flat. I may or may not use the machine for snow removal in the future. I do not have any snow attachments for it currently.

 

I am concerned about chewing up my driveway with the V-bars, however I want maximum grip for pulling out in the yard. Do V-bars really dig into tar?

 

With all that being said, here are a few questions:

 

  • recommended chain type/brand/spacing for my situation
  • should I get some sort of chain tensioner?
  • do I really need the chain tool that I see advertised?
  • do I need tire weights and or some sort of rear weight?
  • recommended weight brands
  • where is the manufacture date on my tractor?
  • Recommended material for building access trail up the hill for driving on (hard pack verses gravel etc...)

 

Thanks in advance to any advice!

 

Scott


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#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 07:52 AM

Welcome to the forum! We have a lot of members up in your neck of the woods, so they would know more of your soil conditions. I wouldn't go for the v'bars as they will mar the drive. They are more for icy conditions, I would think. Loading the turf tires with windshield washer fluid and regular chains would improve traction a lot. Or you can check into some AG type tires and load them with WW fluid. Maybe some wheel weights too.


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#3 jd.rasentrac OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 08:08 AM

:welcometogttalk:


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#4 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 08:33 AM

Yup! You came to the right place. Glad your here! What Kenny said is about right. You need some kind of weight.


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#5 HowardsMF155 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 08:45 AM

Hello skinnison and welcome to GTTalk.  

In my opinion, chains, and especially "V" bar chains, are for icy and snowy conditions where the chain metal will really bite well.  The real choice to make in chains is between "2-link" spacing and "4-link" spacing, which is how far apart the cross chains are located.  The "2-link" chains will do much better at putting power  to the ground.  I think any chain will dig into your asphalt on a hot day when the asphalt gets soft.  Weight is very helpful when it comes to getting traction also.  Someone on here is a big proponent of a product called "RimGuard" which will add a lot of liquid weight in your tires.  I would think a pair of good Ag tires, or perhaps a pair of ATV mud tires will do a good job for you, won't cost but about twice what you will spend on the chains, and won't mark up your asphalt.  Proper tire inflation is important also, because an over-inflated tire will not grip.  


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#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 09:31 AM

Chains are one of those things that balaance out the benifits and disadvantages pretty evenly.
They can help a lot. My hill in a normal year will have wet spots and the chains can make the difference between going and being stuck. Last summer we were in a drought here and was the first time i did not run chains year round.
They are a distinct disadvntage on asphalt or a hard surface, because they are lifting the tire contact patch off the ground as each crossbar comes in contact with the ground. And yes they can scratch the asphalt or in ht weather sink in.

Can you find a route that avoids the pavement? I see your in NH and winters can be very cold. If you userim liquid ballast yo9u will want to use something that does not freeze. Many have had good luck with winshied washer fluid or Rimguard. Rim Guard has a website and if you call them they can tell you what dealers are in you area. I found out the Coop that supplies my LP has a mobile unit and could install on my acreage if I dont want to take itr to them.
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#7 larryd OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 10:31 AM

Welcome scatt , I run washer fluid in my 23/ 10.5/12 ag tires . My lawn is a total inclineof about 20-25 degrees . I had a problem with turf backing up and I still do with ags but not as much . I had a weight bar made for the back of my JD314  with a peg to slide barbell weights on about 150 lbs

 

larryd


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#8 John@Reliable OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 10:55 AM

Any chains will do the job. Adding weight also helps them work better too. This time of year you can find sets at yard sales real cheap, as far as trail, I would stay away from gravel, use dense pack (blue stone w/ fines) or even better and a lot cheaper is "recycled asphalt" but it's harder to spread.

P.S. try running some Seafoam in the gas for carb trouble, and store gas in a good tight container, this ethanol gas we get is causing many problems with small engines due to bad storage. 


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#9 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 10:59 AM

:welcometogttalk:  Like others have said. 2 link is probably better than 4, but 4 link spaced is better than NO chains!

If you will be on ice, "V" bar will really grab the ice, but also scratch up the blacktop & concrete!


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#10 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted May 12, 2013 - 11:48 AM

I a firm believer in Rim Guard.  If you need weight it's much better than WW Fluid as it weighs @ 11 lb./gal. vs. 8 lb./gal. for WW fluid, and it really isn't that much more expensive.  Chains are also a pretty obvious need with turf tires. 

 

In your situation I would also recommend wheel weights. You want to put as much weight as you can on the wheels as that doesn't stress your axles.  I would only add weight to the rear of the tractor if it was absolutely necessary.

 

In a perfect situation, you would have loaded Ag tires for summer use, and loaded turf tires w/chains for winter use.


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#11 skinnison OFFLINE  

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Posted May 13, 2013 - 07:56 AM

Wow, thanks for all the advice and the welcoming! Looks like I picked the correct forum!

 

I will be out straight with work for the next couple of days, but should be able to get going on this project by end of week. I will be sure to post what I do and the outcome. I am thinking 2" chains, no v-bar, and loading up my wheels with liquid, perhaps Rimgaurd or WW fluid. Hopefully I can do this on my own.


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#12 OldBuzzard ONLINE  

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Posted May 13, 2013 - 10:37 AM

Just a bit more info on Rim Guard.

 

IF you decide to go with Rim Guard and you have rubber valve stems, you WILL need to replace them with metal ones.  Rim Guard attacks the adhesives used for assembling the rubber stems.

 

I looked on the Rim Guard site and they say that 23x10.5x12 tires will take 6.8 Gal which will add 72.8 lbs./tire.  WW fluid at 8 lbs./gal would give you 54.4 lbs./tire, a considerable difference.

 

 


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#13 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted May 13, 2013 - 11:25 AM

"turf savers" what an ironic name for a tire that as soon as it loses traction, shreds the grass quicker than anything.

I would agree to stay away from the V bars for general use and your driveway. I personally run Ags with WWF on my Sears, but will be running loaded turfs and wheel weights on my MF1855 once I get it running, I'm curious as to the difference. I see alot of people with loaded turfs, chains and wheel weights all year round with good results.


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#14 skinnison OFFLINE  

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Posted May 14, 2013 - 08:33 PM

Any recommendations on whether to go with the 2" heavy duty or the European Diamond style? Here is the link:

 

http://www.tirechain...23X10.50X12.htm

 

Also, any recommendations on what brand wheel weights I should get. I see that many require drilling into the wheel which I do not want to do! I would like this to be as simple as possible, (like bolt them on and call it a day).


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#15 skinnison OFFLINE  

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Posted May 14, 2013 - 08:38 PM

Just a bit more info on Rim Guard.

 

IF you decide to go with Rim Guard and you have rubber valve stems, you WILL need to replace them with metal ones.  Rim Guard attacks the adhesives used for assembling the rubber stems.

 

I looked on the Rim Guard site and they say that 23x10.5x12 tires will take 6.8 Gal which will add 72.8 lbs./tire.  WW fluid at 8 lbs./gal would give you 54.4 lbs./tire, a considerable difference.

Do I have to bring my wheels somewhere to have this done? If I chose to go the WW route, is that something I could do myself?

 

Thank you






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