Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Cutting Oil


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

Ryan313

    PK Fanatic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 7087
  • 3,239 Thanks
  • 5,159 posts
  • Location: Wallkill, NY

Posted May 11, 2013 - 05:39 PM

What kind of cutting do you guys use for drilling and cutting threads? Is there a brand that is better then others? Is there another alternative that is cheaper, but just as effective?
  • boyscout862 said thank you

#2 Guest_gravely-power_*

Guest_gravely-power_*
  • Guests
  • Member No: 0
  • 0 Thanks

Posted May 11, 2013 - 05:46 PM

Ryan, any oil is better than none. So I don't think any one brand is better than any other.


  • boyscout862 said thank you

#3 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

Ryan313

    PK Fanatic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 7087
  • 3,239 Thanks
  • 5,159 posts
  • Location: Wallkill, NY

Posted May 11, 2013 - 05:53 PM

Ryan, any oil is better than none. So I don't think any one brand is better than any other.


Yes, I know. I have actually been using old engine oil. But, now that I have a drill press I should probably do it the right way.

#4 hamman OFFLINE  

hamman

    Homelite Owner Extraordinaire

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1733
  • 5,626 Thanks
  • 2,579 posts
  • Location: Michigan

Posted May 11, 2013 - 06:17 PM

You can go to a plumbing supply and buy thread cutting oil. They used to sell them in pints, quarts and gallons. Pricy but works well. Ridgid was the brand name.


  • boyscout862 said thank you

#5 superaben ONLINE  

superaben
  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 11204
  • 7,664 Thanks
  • 5,677 posts
  • Location: Shenandoah Valley, VA

Posted May 11, 2013 - 07:29 PM

There's thread cutting oil sold at Ace under the Ace brand for 13 something a quart I believe.

 

Ben W.


  • hamman and boyscout862 have said thanks

#6 Clippnalawn OFFLINE  

Clippnalawn

    Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 4993
  • 109 Thanks
  • 104 posts
  • Location: Bellingham, Washington

Posted May 11, 2013 - 09:09 PM

I use Rapid Tap for cutting, threading and drilling. Seems to do an excellent job lubricating the drill bits. When i was making the backing plate and hitch for my massey it involved a lot of drilling, and stepping up in drill size to get to the 1/2" final hole. When I had to change bits none of hem were too hot to handle with bare hands, and they were all still sharp enough to pull big curls of steel even on the last hole. image.jpg

#7 Oo-v-oO OFFLINE  

Oo-v-oO

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 5162
  • 340 Thanks
  • 448 posts
  • Location: Live Free or Die, USA

Posted May 11, 2013 - 09:16 PM

Cutting oil is one thing but tapping fluid is another. You can use just about any kind of oil to help drill, saw, or whatever but when it comes to tapping threads a specialized tap fluid makes quite a difference. 

 

Tap Magic works well, for one. You can get it mail ordered through MSC. 

http://www.mscdirect...roduct/00262253

 

Be aware that different kinds of metals benefit from different formulations of tap fluid, too. The Tap magic product for aluminum is here:  

http://www.mscdirect...roduct/40987679

 

We *used* to be able to get a product called Tapfree, made by Winbro in Massachusetts, that was frankly amazing. It worked great for extracting rusted bolts, too. Unfortunately, what was probably the or one of the active ingredients was 1,1,1 Trichloroethane. They reformulated it to remove the 1,1,1 and it is nowhere near as good now. 

They removed the 1,1,1 because it is bad for the ozone layer. I am environmentally conscious, but I think the benefit I got from using an awesome tapping fluid was well worth releasing a little bit of Trichloroethane. I mean, a pint can of the stuff would last for months and months in a production maintenance environment and probably years at home. Just a few drops is all you needed, it's not like we were using the stuff by the 55 gallon drum. 

If you EVER see a can of original formula Tapfree, BUY IT. Buy ALL of it. 


  • JRJ said thank you

#8 JDBrian OFFLINE  

JDBrian

    Super Moderator

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2507
  • 9,574 Thanks
  • 14,136 posts
  • Location: Hubley, Nova Scotia - Canada

Posted May 12, 2013 - 05:48 AM

Ryan, I'll second rapid tap for tapping and I also grab the can for drilling sometimes as well. I also have a small oil can with cheap 30w oil in it that I use for drilling. You're probably fine with the used engine oil but it is a bit messier than new oil would be and a cheap quart of oil would last you for years. 



#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

JD DANNELS

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2011
  • 3,786 Thanks
  • 3,907 posts
  • Location: Newton.Ia

Posted May 13, 2013 - 08:43 PM

Cutting oil is one thing but tapping fluid is another. You can use just about any kind of oil to help drill, saw, or whatever but when it comes to tapping threads a specialized tap fluid makes quite a difference. 
 
Tap Magic works well, for one. You can get it mail ordered through MSC. 
http://www.mscdirect...roduct/00262253
 
Be aware that different kinds of metals benefit from different formulations of tap fluid, too. The Tap magic product for aluminum is here:  

http://www.mscdirect...roduct/40987679

yeah what he said!! I am not picky about oils for drilling. But you can ruin a tap or break it and find it real difficult to get out if it is not lubed with the proper tapping fluid and read up on proper technique for tapping.
The replacements can be expensive and often more important is lost time removing a broken one. The ones mentioned are the most popular.

 
We *used* to be able to get a product called Tapfree, made by Winbro in Massachusetts, that was frankly amazing. It worked great for extracting rusted bolts, too. Unfortunately, what was probably the or one of the active ingredients was 1,1,1 Trichloroethane. They reformulated it to remove the 1,1,1 and it is nowhere near as good now. 
They removed the 1,1,1 because it is bad for the ozone layer. I am environmentally conscious, but I think the benefit I got from using an awesome tapping fluid was well worth releasing a little bit of Trichloroethane. I mean, a pint can of the stuff would last for months and months in a production maintenance environment and probably years at home. Just a few drops is all you needed, it's not like we were using the stuff by the 55 gallon drum. 
If you EVER see a can of original formula Tapfree, BUY IT. Buy ALL of it.



#10 MH81 OFFLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,254 Thanks
  • 28,603 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted May 13, 2013 - 09:13 PM

I have had good luck with this
http://www.harborfre...cant-92581.html

It's sticky and kinda gooey, but it does seem to work real well and stays where you put it until it gets warmed up.

The CRC brand is sold in many other places than HF, but around here, they are all 2-3 times the price.

I will say that it says ferrous and non ferrous metals... I would use something else for tapping aluminum.

#11 ghack ONLINE  

ghack
  • Member
  • Member No: 36839
  • 29 Thanks
  • 35 posts

Posted June 03, 2013 - 10:25 PM

Engine oil should not be used for drilling cutting or any thing else but in an engine. it's a hi pressure lubricant, it's designed to not cut! i.e. NOT a cutting oil.
For steel work not much beats the old black hi sulpher cutting oil for drilling and tapping. for aluminum kerosene is good for both. yes there is more expensive specialized fluids but for most home shop stuff, this works.

Edited by MH81, June 03, 2013 - 10:40 PM.

  • WNYTractorTinkerer said thank you

#12 HydroHarold OFFLINE  

HydroHarold
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 9622
  • 702 Thanks
  • 977 posts
  • Location: Mid Hudson NY

Posted June 04, 2013 - 11:38 PM

Since high school, in my shop when I couldn't get true cutting oil, my choice was always 20wt engine oil cut with kero, diesel or naptha.  About 50/50 works decent.  The object is to keep the bit and cutting surface cool and a squirt can pooling the mix around the bit is the idea.  Can't say about cutting threads as I always used the thread cutting oil the job supplied...






Top