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Advanced Metal Repair - Hood (Part A)


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#1 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 06:31 PM

Well, I figure this may come in handy for someone, as well as letting you all see me bring back the hood on that Hydro I just picked up.

My problem... I have two hoods, one with a hole in the top & a seriously buggered headlight panel. The other has a really nice headlight panel AND trim ring, but suffered a blow by a monkey with a hammer to fit a battery two sizes too big into it. Not pretty at all and too far gone to repair.

The solution? Remove the headlight panel from the good one and put it in the hood with the hole in it. Part B will show how I patch the hole... :smilewink:

Here is the good hood & mounting panel... However, it is welded onto the hood! If you look to the floor on the right side you can get an idea of how bad the hood was beat up.
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This... is the hood we shall be fixing, with heavy rust and a hole in the hood. Not pretty, Eh?
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Goal A, remove the good mount panel without damage to the panel. The hood can be trashed. IF I needed to save the hood and panel, I could drill out the spot welds. This method can leave you with a mess to weld up, more so if the spot welds line up in the new hood! Then you have a hole that needs to be filled on both sides! My trick here is to use a grinding stone or cut off wheel to grind down the weld to the mount panel.
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Then I cut out the damaged mount panel leaving the flange still on the hood. I forgot to grab a photo, but I just left the 1" x 3" strip of metal that sits against the hood. From there, I did much the same as how I removed the welds on the hood. I just ground down the welds until I could remove all of the flange leaving me a clean bare hood... with no holes or damage!
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Now I must put the trim ring back on because the trim ring is what will position the mounting panel exactly where it needs to go back on. As you see, both sides look original at this time. My next step would be to drill two holes in the hood after marking the inside so I can position the just where I want them. The two holes can be plug welded in to attach the mount panel in place. I "could" use a factory style spot welder to fuse them back together, but it's not worth bringing it to someone who has one just for that. Plus, I have two indents from the spot welds on the hood now, and then I would have four. I am waiting on that part for now because I need to run the hood in my electrolysis tank and it will be easier to clean without the mount panel.
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Part B will show the hood after it's been dunked and because the hood will go on a tractor without headlights, I will re-install the knock out's.

Hope you enjoyed a couple tricks from the world of auto body repair! :beerchug:
  • Sawdust said thank you

#2 tinner OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 07:16 PM

Looking good, waiting to see the rest. What did you make your electrolysis tank? I have a plastic 55 gal. drum I'm going to make one from but need one large enough for a 1650 hood too. Thinking about a kids wading pool or wood frame with plastic liner.

#3 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 07:31 PM

Well, I have a small 5 gallon tank that stays filled: See it here=> Electrolysis

I have used many methods for other stuff, like you said... kiddie pools, garden trailers lined with plastic. I even saw someone with a back hoe dig a hole, lined the hole and put a farm tractor frame into it! I think the best tank is those ones that are the size of a pallet and have the cage around them. Cut out the top, attach a wood frame around the part you cut out so that it can be put back on as a lid and you have a huge tank. (I think they are 275 gallons) I have been looking for one and some day I will find it. This one will fit in a 55 gallon tank though.

PS, ask around for someone who had one of those inflatable pools (like 15 foot) they always spring leaks and get tossed... They make great liners! Then you just need to make a small box out of plywood that your hood will fit in. Toss in the liner, let it hang over and put the hood into your new tank.

#4 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 07:42 PM

That looks good take the best parts from 2 to make 1 good one, the hood on my 66MF10 that I used looked just like yours with the broken headlight panel, broke in the same spot. I fixed mine, had no choice it was the best one I had at the time that I could use.

#5 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 07:51 PM

Well, I have a small 5 gallon tank that stays filled: See it here=> Electrolysis

I have used many methods for other stuff, like you said... kiddie pools, garden trailers lined with plastic. I even saw someone with a back hoe dig a hole, lined the hole and put a farm tractor frame into it! I think the best tank is those ones that are the size of a pallet and have the cage around them. Cut out the top, attach a wood frame around the part you cut out so that it can be put back on as a lid and you have a huge tank. (I think they are 275 gallons) I have been looking for one and some day I will find it. This one will fit in a 55 gallon tank though.

PS, ask around for someone who had one of those inflatable pools (like 15 foot) they always spring leaks and get tossed... They make great liners! Then you just need to make a small box out of plywood that your hood will fit in. Toss in the liner, let it hang over and put the hood into your new tank.


I don't know how far you are from me but I just got one of the big tanks on a skid from work for free. Could probably snag another one.

You are making good progress on the hood.

#6 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 07:53 PM

Yea, I figured that hood with the good front panel was work! The headlight holes make it really nice to clamp for welding too.

The junk hood has not given up nearly enough yet though, that is where my patch for the hole will come from. That way I know it's the same gauge steel. After that, it will kick around and be chopped up for patches or what ever I can make from it. It's good gauge steel and has some pretty big flat areas.

#7 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 07:55 PM

I don't know how far you are from me but I just got one of the big tanks on a skid from work for free. Could probably snag another one.

You are making good progress on the hood.


Yea, pretty far... I am in the far northern corner, about 10 miles from the Mass & RI border's. It would be sweet if you were closer, I would take you up on it!

#8 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 10:42 PM

I found a TIG attachment for $75 that I can run of my XMT 304 Miller that does my MIG 2 spool. These things (TIG) work great for light metals. Seems like I am going to be in the same boat in the near future. Some of my stuff is in sorry shape.

#9 FirefyterEmt OFFLINE  

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Posted October 26, 2010 - 11:58 PM

I have a Hobart Mig at my shop and it works great. Back in trade school to pass the welding section, we had to weld 9without blow outs) the edges of two single edged razor blades with a mig. It can be done, but it's not easy! Honestly, the hood metal is pretty thick... kinda like working on a car from the 50's!

#10 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2010 - 04:47 AM

Nice work on that hood.:thumbs:

Speaking of TIGS , they are great machines,one of these days I am going buy one.But for now,I'll just work away with my MIG.

#11 jhn9840 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2010 - 05:24 AM

Very nice work on the hood. Some great metal working tips in this thread.

jhn9840
John

#12 mastifflawyer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 27, 2010 - 05:46 AM

Might I suggest that while the headlight panel is out, make a paper pattern of it. That panel would be easy to duplicate and having a pattern on hand just might come in handy.

As to the Tig. I have been working on a wheel that had some rust holes through it. It has given me time to practice with the Tig and Mig. The good part is that it is Hydriv's wheel..haha Anyway I have found that for me the Mig works much better than the Tig on the really thin metal. The reason being that just getting the Tig arc to strike is enough to blow holes. Even with a copper backer I had some control problems. With the Mig I was able to hit the edges where the metal was thick and then fill. I then fill a bit on the opposite side and grind. The most difficult area was around the valve stem hole. With a big hole already there the Tig made it open up more.




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