Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo

Easy To Paint?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Dieselcubmike OFFLINE  

Dieselcubmike
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 11127
  • 1,327 Thanks
  • 1,511 posts
  • Location: Southwestern,Pa

Posted May 02, 2013 - 09:32 PM

Ok guys so im looking for some input. Im not sure if this belongs here but ill give it a try. Im looking into possibly learning to paint my own things since auto body shops charge an arm and a leg and im a bit sketchy about having other people do it (last paint job I had done was on a sears custom years ago and they guy painted outside and needless to say that he painted the bugs with it :mad2: ) How easy is it to paint your own things with a gun? Im not looking for a huge setup or anything like that but I know you have to buy special paints and mixtures and all that stuff but how easy and affordable is it for a nooby to get into? I have 0 practice with painting other than rattle cans but I would like to learn on my own at my own pace instead of going to an auto body class and paying to learn. Just looking for everyones thoughts :wave:  


  • JRJ said thank you

#2 Cat385B ONLINE  

Cat385B

    Therapy CAT

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8002
  • 11,722 Thanks
  • 8,903 posts
  • Location: MN

Posted May 02, 2013 - 10:10 PM

If you have a suitable compressor, you're 3/4 of the way there.

 

HVLP gun. (high volume, low pressure) Anywhere from $15 up to $100. I got a cheapy HF gun for $15 and it works fine. Making sure it's properly cleaned after each use is the key.

 

Things you need that you wouldn't use normally with spray cans:

 

Filters. Used for straining paint. Not 100% necessary, imo. (If you keep a very clean work area and clean the can of paint carefully after each pour) $10 for a box of 100 at HF.

 

Face mask. Using a gun gives you finer particles that make their way to your lungs much easier than from a spray can. $25 for one with the black filters. (black stripe filter = organic vapors protection)

 

You need a measuring cup that is graduated. You may not use the spare one in the kitchen. (I asked) I got a 22 oz beer glass that works great. $5.

 

Cleaning and mixing agents: Most of the time paint thinner (mineral spirits) are fine for cleaning, and also used some times for a thinner. $6 a gallon. I like to use lacquer thinner when I'm done with a project and putting the gun away for a while. It cleans better. That stuff is spendy these days. $15 a gallon. VM&P Naptha is sometimes used as a thinner, depending on the brand of paint. Just used as a thinning agent though, not as a cleaner, so a quart lasts a long time. $10. Depending on the brand of paint used, you can be thinning at a 8:1 ratio. It's more personal preference there.

 

Enamel hardener: Mixed with paint at a 8:1 ratio. Makes the paint dry faster, makes it shine better, and makes it tougher. $16 for a half pint can. I have used up roughly 5 quarts of paint this winter, I'm on my second bottle of hardener. Little goes a long ways. Hardener is the dangerous crud, though. It's the main reason you should have a mask on. Nasty crap to breathe in. But it makes a big difference of paint appearance. 

 

Okay, those above are the things you're losing out on. Here is the $$ saving part: the paint. A quart is $12 for tractor enamel. It goes much farther than two $6 cans of spray paint. Unbelievably farther. Because it's on thinner? Because it's mixed and thinned down? Who knows? It's a mystery. But I think my cost savings, with the thinning, cleaning, and hardeners added in are over 25% per job. I have used two different brands of tractor enamel, Valsper and Van Sickle. Hated the Van sickle, love the Valspar.

 

This blower: Half a quart of primer, just over half a quart of gloss black paint. 3-4 coats of it, though.

 

Bolens snowthrower3.jpg Assembly 003.jpg


  • lyall, KennyP, bgkid2966 and 5 others have said thanks

#3 Cat385B ONLINE  

Cat385B

    Therapy CAT

  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 8002
  • 11,722 Thanks
  • 8,903 posts
  • Location: MN

Posted May 02, 2013 - 10:13 PM

Oh, I forgot to mention: before this winter, I was a rattle can painter, and not real good at it. I could never get a good shine. Here is what I just finished Tuesday with the cheap HVLP:

image.jpg

 

I just took that pic, it's dry. Here is what I get with a rattle can:

Megan's eir piercing 005.jpg

 

Both blowers were used this winter. The Homelite doesn't look near that nice anymore. The Bolens has a couple of scratches in it from moving it around. The paint in the chutes? The Homelite was 60% gone. The Bolens has a few marks on it. Much tougher paint with the hardener in it. (if properly cured before use)


  • KennyP and PaPasTractor have said thanks

#4 Gtractor ONLINE  

Gtractor

    The Tractor Hoarder

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 782
  • 6,612 Thanks
  • 3,912 posts
  • Location: Chillicothe, MO

Posted May 03, 2013 - 12:45 AM

Excellent advise above but I just wanted to toss another option into the ring.  Our local vocational school [where I took two years of auto body class in the late '80's] offers a condensed version via evening classes.  The cost is only $45 total and they meet one night a week for six or eight weeks.  If something like that is offered in your area it would be a good place to get the basics.  You are not likely  to be good at it in that short of time but then you can practice on your own schedule and become the painter you want to be. 

You just can't go wrong learning a new skill.  Good luck!    :thumbs:


  • Cat385B and PaPasTractor have said thanks

#5 superaben OFFLINE  

superaben
  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 11204
  • 7,664 Thanks
  • 5,677 posts
  • Location: Shenandoah Valley, VA

Posted May 03, 2013 - 01:43 PM

Scott's the man today.  That should almost go as a restoration "how-to" painting basics article!

 

Ben W.



#6 PaPasTractor OFFLINE  

PaPasTractor
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 9237
  • 197 Thanks
  • 158 posts
  • Location: Northern Indiana

Posted May 03, 2013 - 03:09 PM

If you have mastered the rattle can, you are going to love the spray gun.  Lays the paint better and you can cover a larger area in no time.

To add one item to Cats list , it would be an inline filter for moisture. 
The spray gun mentioned from HF (HVLP gravity fed) is the gun I use and works perfect.  Just make sure to take your time & clean it well.
I am starting my 3rd year with mine and can't complain for a $12.00 investment. ( bought it with 20% off coupon)

As far as paint, I agree with Cat.  You can spend alot of $$$ if you want to buy "special" paint.  I use Majik Tractor & Implement paint made with 100% USA grown soybean oil.  Comes in many tractor colors & mixes well to create your own custom colors if you want.  I get it at Rulal King for $11.00 qt. or $29.00 gal.  TSC also sells this brand for a couple $'s more.

Best of luck with your new hobby.


Edited by PaPasTractor, May 03, 2013 - 03:11 PM.


#7 PaPasTractor OFFLINE  

PaPasTractor
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 9237
  • 197 Thanks
  • 158 posts
  • Location: Northern Indiana

Posted May 03, 2013 - 03:25 PM

022.JPG      This DB sulky was done with the HF spray gun & Majik primer & paint.
                                                    2 coats grey primer - 2 coats paint - Summer sun dried.


  • KennyP said thank you

#8 Dieselcubmike OFFLINE  

Dieselcubmike
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 11127
  • 1,327 Thanks
  • 1,511 posts
  • Location: Southwestern,Pa

Posted May 03, 2013 - 10:17 PM

Excellent advise above but I just wanted to toss another option into the ring.  Our local vocational school [where I took two years of auto body class in the late '80's] offers a condensed version via evening classes.  The cost is only $45 total and they meet one night a week for six or eight weeks.  If something like that is offered in your area it would be a good place to get the basics.  You are not likely  to be good at it in that short of time but then you can practice on your own schedule and become the painter you want to be. 

You just can't go wrong learning a new skill.  Good luck!    :thumbs:

That's what my votech offered kris. I really didn't want to spend the money on the eveing classes its 375$ here and its 8 weeks. But I have thought about it before trust me. Its a great skill to have and its something that has always inspired me with custom paint jobs and and designs. Thanks for the advice everyone! :D  :thumbs:



#9 916 hydro OFFLINE  

916 hydro
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 10159
  • 114 Thanks
  • 139 posts
  • Location: dillsboro IN

Posted May 04, 2013 - 08:02 AM

breathing saftey is #1 when using a gun, cheap out on anything you want but buy you a good mask and good filters make sure you have more than ample ventilation. the harbor frieght hvlp gun is a great all around paint gun. i like to use a binks model 7 for primer because it dosent harden up in the gun if i leave it sit while stopping to sand primer. find yourself an old car hood or decklid to practice on just sand it smooth and go again til you get it figured out. its alot of fun and the results are very satisfying compared to rattle cans. also i like to keep a seprate air hose just for painting its shorter than my regular hose just log enough to reach the painting area and it's kept clean as a whistle. dirt is your biggest enemy when painting with a gun the shop cant be too clean

Edited by 916 hydro, May 04, 2013 - 08:06 AM.





Top