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First Time Plowing


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#1 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2013 - 07:41 PM

I have a garden spot that we have worked on since 2006, although we have missed a couple of years including last year.  Since my 67 Sears Suburban 10 is finally usable, it was time to plow.  I still haven't found a plow but have found an old Roper disk.  Frank let me borrow his Sears 10" Moldboard plow.  I went to hook it up and my center link couldn't raise it.  I have an older style hitch, the kind that uses a center link that is just a bent rod on the ends but the centerlink that I found to buy recently has the forked clevis on the ends.  Frank came over and said he had a hitch that I could use so I switched it out.  It worked although I didn't like it as if there is no implement installed, the handle lays on the tire if it falls back. This was yesterday afternoon and it was pretty warm out.

I drove back to the garden and dropped the plow, leaned on the handle and started moving, I released the pressure on the handle and it plowed a nice furrow.  Tried another pass and same thing.  I was in business.  After about a half dozen passes, the bees started "warning" me with gentle bumps.  I knew it was to warm to be making all the noise next to them and high tailed it back to the house.  This morning, I went out and finished the job as it was much cooler and the honeybees were not as active.

Tomorrow, I get my first try at using a disk to cut it up.

I did take a few pics:

plowed01.JPG

plowed02.JPG

plowed03.JPG

 


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#2 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2013 - 08:05 PM

looks like it did good for you. Seat time is always great.


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#3 Rock farmer ONLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2013 - 08:05 PM

Now that looks like fun!

Are you raising honey bees?

Joe
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#4 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2013 - 08:57 PM

I do have 6 active hives presently.  I don't really do much with them, just let them be.  I take a little honey now and then.  I didn't take any this past fall, figuring I would wait till springtime to make sure they had enough but still haven't got into them.  I am not one of those folks who rob all the honey and feed them back high fructose cord syrup and then treat for sicknesses and pests.  I figured they need their honey to be strong survivors so let them have it.  I really need to move the ones closest to the garden but they are heavy and I have no help.  You really have to dress up for things like that.  I should have moved them in the winter when it would have been much easier. They don't come out when it's freezing.


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#5 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2013 - 05:00 AM

The garden looks good. Can't wait to get out into mine in a few weeks.


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#6 1978murray OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2013 - 07:32 AM

good job u did there. make sure u post pics of the disking


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#7 Jordan9682 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 27, 2013 - 04:38 PM

Looks good. How well does the tractor pull a plow?
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#8 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 27, 2013 - 08:51 PM

It plowed great as long as I moved fast enough till I hit where it had never been plowed. No chains or extra weights.  I am not sure if the narrow tires are filled or not.


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#9 Jordan9682 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 27, 2013 - 09:03 PM

As long as it works, right?
Be sure to post some pics of when you disc it
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#10 SonnyT OFFLINE  

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Posted April 27, 2013 - 09:07 PM

Did a fine job with Turf Tires and no chains! PDT_Armataz_01_37.gif


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#11 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2013 - 01:55 PM

Looks like you did a good job on your first time.  Congratulations.


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#12 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2013 - 10:20 PM

In typical Sears fashion, no fuss, no muss just results. :thumbs:

As for discing, you will want to do a little planning. Speed and weight are your friends with that kind of setup and a thought out entry and exit route will keep you moving up to speed.


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#13 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted April 29, 2013 - 10:28 PM

Oh, and as for the three point handle hitting the tire.
http://gardentractor...ng/#entry203188
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#14 Avalontractor OFFLINE  

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Posted October 22, 2013 - 04:37 PM

I do have 6 active hives presently.  I don't really do much with them, just let them be.  I take a little honey now and then.  I didn't take any this past fall, figuring I would wait till springtime to make sure they had enough but still haven't got into them.  I am not one of those folks who rob all the honey and feed them back high fructose cord syrup and then treat for sicknesses and pests.  I figured they need their honey to be strong survivors so let them have it.  I really need to move the ones closest to the garden but they are heavy and I have no help.  You really have to dress up for things like that.  I should have moved them in the winter when it would have been much easier. They don't come out when it's freezing.

Hey Robert,

 

We are thinking that it might be a good idea to start a few hives here at home. As you no doubt know, bees are being decimated all over North America. Might be the result of the numerous chemicals being used in a wide-spread fashion, or, might be due to natural influences. Probably a bit of both. In any event; diminished bee populations is bad news for everyone, including those of us lucky enough to have a plot large enough to work with a garden tractor. Our little field is just 5,000 square feet but feeds us and two in-law families, providing enough basic food easily.

 

We live in Newfoundland. Among the other unique factors we deal with here is the fact that the suspected parasite which is killing hives does not, or, at least has not been able to survive here. Our natural and (few) commercial hives still prosper. Further-more, the harvested honey benefits because the keepers need not medicate to keep the bees healthy. This has caught my attention.

 

While we have no interest in producing honey on a commercial basis, or for that matter for our own use, we feel it might be important to help bees thrive as an aid to the natural development of crops/flowers. My wife is actually very spooked by bees and truth be told I always relinquish "air-space" when working among the plants. Still, we understand just how vital the bees are.

 

What would be involved in establishing a few hives on our property. We have two acres, half wooded, and live in an area where most neighbours would have the same or bigger. Most do not grow veg. plots, but again, most, have extensive flower beds. I believe it is illegal to import bees to the island part of the province so a "ready made" hive may be difficult to establish. If the scary decline on the continent continues, there will be a need to source bees from somewhere. The more healthy populations the better. As an aside; this past summer was a steller one in terms of weather. We had record temperatures and the longest span of frost free days. However, I did not see a single Monarch butterfly in our gardens. Though they have been seen in reduced numbers for years now, we always managed to observe some. 2013 has been blank. This is quite concerning.

 

Thanks

 

Tom


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#15 robert_p43 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 22, 2013 - 05:08 PM

Tom, I was able to start my first hive by buying a package of bees.  It was shipped through the mail.  They put a queen bee in a little cage along with 2 pounds of bees and a can of syrup to keep them fed.  I just dumped them into my first hive and let the queen go iside the hive.  I really can't say what your best option is there but I believe it is springtime there?  That would be the best time to get some.   I belong to a natural beekeeping forum although I haven't been there for awhile.  I think there are members there from Newfoundland.  You may just find out the best options and maybe where you might get a colony if you join up there and post an introduction.  Do an internet search for "Biobees."  If you can't find it, let me know and I will pm you a link or two.

 

I never did get pics of using the disc because that was when the valve spring broke.  I did plow and disc in the fall but forgot all about pictures.


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