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Cotter Pins


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#16 HDWildBill ONLINE  

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Posted April 22, 2013 - 09:22 AM

When I went through "A" School in the Navy to learn to work on Aircraft they taught us to bend both sides and then to bend the ends back into the shaft so you ended up with it looking something like a bow tie.  The reason to bend it back into the shaft was for safety so the end would not cut you.   

 

thom I agree with everyone else there is no such thing as a silly question.  The US Navy thought enough about it to give us lessons on working with cotter pins so... Thanks for asking.


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#17 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 22, 2013 - 04:17 PM

 I agree with Harold as this is right. I tend to buy Cotter pins long and clip them as needed.

 

I'm detecting a bias against Left Handed and am mildy offended. :D  Remeber Left Handed People are in their Right Mind.

 

BTW: How many remeber the old Mopars, With Righthanded thread Lug Nuts on one side and left handed on the other, so they would not work loose due to ratation direction??

I remember those well! Wouldn't mind having one of those right about now!


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#18 NJKen OFFLINE  

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Posted April 22, 2013 - 05:39 PM


Bending both sides will keep a pin from turning and rubbing in close spaces like inside a dust cap. If it's a low vibration and tension situation and the pin needs to be removed often, only open one side of the pin about 45º for easier multiple uses. On a rod application the bent pin arms should reach at least 3/4 around the pin. This is mid 50's auto shop knowledge and may be obsolete by now. Most everything I thought I knew, today is obsolete! :D



BTW: How many remeber the old Mopars, With Righthanded thread Lug Nuts on one side and left handed on the other, so they would not work loose due to ratation direction??

I remember well, because my first flat tire ever, on my hand me down Chrysler town and country wagon had them. 1968 I think it was.

I was in Philly on kind of a date, got a flat but made it to the party I was going to. Broke two lugs off before someone suggested turning them the other way. Made it home with 3 good lugs. Then bought new ones with the "L" stamped into the end. Missed that too. I was 17 then and had other things on my mind. Lol
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#19 Goatboy OFFLINE  

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Posted April 22, 2013 - 07:09 PM

No one has mentioned not to reuse a cotter pin, especially in a life or death situation like wheel bearings, tie rods, ball joints etc.

They weaken and break if they get bent too many times. Not to say I've never done it, but I've been told.

 

I have also noticed all cotter pins are not created equal. I bought a box of assorted sizes of cotter pins at my local discount tool store and man are they junk. They are so soft I don't even need pliers most of the time. If I use pliers I can collapse the head and pull them right through. The pins that came with the new pitman arm  for my truck, on the other hand, were so hard I thought they might snap.

 

Anybody know if they have a grading system, like bolts?


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#20 IamSherwood OFFLINE  

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Posted April 22, 2013 - 07:18 PM

Here is a link about cotter pins.

 

I'd like to find the best supplier, because the bulk packs that you get from

places like Harbour Fr... or princess auto, are junk, and they don't fit. More

of that "made in China" stuff. Are they still made in America?


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#21 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2013 - 06:49 AM

Some of the treasures that I come across when tag saleing is old hardware that is still new in the box. I like the old "made inAmerica" stuff. It is cheaper and better quality that way. I occasionally come across boxes that don't have zip codes on the manufacturers address. That means that they are atleast 50 years old. Just right for my ACs and Bolens. Good Luck, Rick



#22 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2013 - 11:15 AM

When I went through "A" School in the Navy to learn to work on Aircraft they taught us to bend both sides and then to bend the ends back into the shaft so you ended up with it looking something like a bow tie.  The reason to bend it back into the shaft was for safety so the end would not cut you.   

 

 

I worked on a JD LT133 over the weekend, had to remove the front pins for steering arms. They cotter keys were bent like that, almost made a little teepee on the pin. I found it weird, never seen anything like that.



#23 thom OFFLINE  

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Posted April 23, 2013 - 05:31 PM

I remember my first experience with "lefthand" lug nuts. After owning many old model ( 30s and 40s) Chevrolets,I bought a 1940 Studebaker sedan. After I hauled it home , with 4 flat tires, I tried to remove the wheels so I could replace the tires. The first two wheels  were easy enough. The other side was a problem. After I discovered that turning counter-clockwise  would not work I split one with the only chisel I had , which was too small for the job. Then I decided to just break the remaining studs by turning them clockwise. You guessed it , all the remaining nuts screwed off. The old sayin "Lefty loosey , righty tighty" doesn't always prove true.






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