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Wood Stove for the shop


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#16 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 01:37 PM

Standard is end of pipe is to be 3' above anything within 10'!

My shop is small (14' x 24'), I use a "jacketed" wood space heater. 9' of pipe (total), 6" black stove pipe (heavier duty than the "blued"), to the square, hanger there, then insulated 6" pipe straight up to cap. I do end up with the door open a lot! The stove never goes out all winter, I'm on my 3rd stove in about 30 years. Prefer brick lined firebox, but the one I bought for $100 (used) this summer is cast iron lined.

My shop has a mildly sloped roof, so it's easy to clean the chimney with a 6" wire brush on a 10' metal conduit! ~~ grnspot110

#17 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 05:54 PM

As stated earlier, Our local code says 3' above the peak and in addition to that, there must be a spark arrestor installed at the top of the chimney. I also agree that safest is best and you should look into that aspect thoroughly! Talking to your local zoning officers, the fire dept., and your insurance company are all recommended ideas!

#18 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 06:58 PM

I forget things are more complicated in certain areas. Here in the country, most of us farmers, we just build within common sense and not too much hassle. Even then, we do have to keep insurance requirements in mind. So yes, definitely check local codes & stay within them.

#19 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 07:07 PM

IMO the best place for you wood stove is in the middle of the floor of the shop, or at least in the middle of the longest wall with the chimney going straight up. As said before make sure you have lots of clearance around stove and chimney pipe, both parts will radiate heat and you do not want anything combustible near them.
If you must run the chimney though the wall use the proper pipe for that and use a T instead of a 90deg. elbow, Ts,get 1 end capped off and the cap is removable for cleaning.
Best way to distribute the heat is a ceiling fan or anything that blows the air down or around.
I heat my shop with a wood furnace and the chimney is probably the most important part.

The last thing you want is your shop to catch fire.

#20 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2010 - 07:54 AM

As stated earlier, Our local code says 3' above the peak and in addition to that, there must be a spark arrestor installed at the top of the chimney. I also agree that safest is best and you should look into that aspect thoroughly! Talking to your local zoning officers, the fire dept., and your insurance company are all recommended ideas!


I talked with the insurance company to find out how much it would increase my premiums before I decided I was going to do this

I forget things are more complicated in certain areas. Here in the country, most of us farmers, we just build within common sense and not too much hassle. Even then, we do have to keep insurance requirements in mind. So yes, definitely check local codes & stay within them.


Olcowhand: it's like that here too. All this talk of local code and building departments is new to me. Around here you build what you want where you want. Just have to call before you dig if its where lines might be.

IMO the best place for you wood stove is in the middle of the floor of the shop, or at least in the middle of the longest wall with the chimney going straight up. As said before make sure you have lots of clearance around stove and chimney pipe, both parts will radiate heat and you do not want anything combustible near them.
If you must run the chimney though the wall use the proper pipe for that and use a T instead of a 90deg. elbow, Ts,get 1 end capped off and the cap is removable for cleaning.
Best way to distribute the heat is a ceiling fan or anything that blows the air down or around.
I heat my shop with a wood furnace and the chimney is probably the most important part.

The last thing you want is your shop to catch fire.


If I put it in the middle of the shop I loose the ability to work on cars in there. I have a ceiling fan waiting to be installed.

And yes I dont want to burn the place down. Thats why I am asking for help.

#21 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2010 - 05:44 PM


If I put it in the middle of the shop I loose the ability to work on cars in there. I have a ceiling fan waiting to be installed.

And yes I dont want to burn the place down. Thats why I am asking for help.


Chuck my wood furnace is tucked away in the corner just like you want to do, if I put mine in the middle I'd have the same problem as you or anybody would. Fans are the answer. It's warmer near the stove and cooler at the opposite side. I think a safe distance is 3' all the way around the stove on a non combustible floor. Mine needs to be moved to make the chimney go more straighter up instead of the way it is, too much of a horizontal run needs to be cleaned out once or twice a season, and builds up mostly in the elbows. Sounds like what every you come up with is going to be save and that's the way to do it.

#22 DH1 ONLINE  

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Posted October 31, 2010 - 03:53 PM

Fired up my wood furnace today for the first time this season, runs as it always has no surprises. They forecast -3c in the city tonight, so - 5 or 6 where I am (20*F) that will finish off whatever is still left in the garden.

#23 SandburRanch OFFLINE  

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Posted November 02, 2010 - 07:37 PM

With the price of stove pipe these days a person may be able to pick up some 6" pipe line pipe at the scrap yard that would compete in cost. With it you could clean it easily with a pig. The launching system wouldn't have to be nearly as sophisticated as this one in the video.

YouTube - Pipeline Pig Launcher (AMPL)

#24 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2011 - 09:06 AM

Well The stove never got installed last year, but I will be installing it this weekend. I bought the stove pipe last weekend and then cleaned up the stove (it had sat outside for over a year) and gave it a coat of high temp paint. It looks so much better now. I am going to make my own double walled pipe for where it will exit the roof by running a piece of 6" pipe through and 8". Last winter a branch fell in a ice storm and tore a hole in the roof, so i had to replace a panel of roofing, I am going to run my pipe out through that pannel so if I ever want to take out the stove I can simply replace that panel again.

here are a few pictures of the stove. This is close to where it will be installed, I still have to rearrange somethings, and move some junk, but I wanted to get it in the shop before it rained last night. The stove it made from a old transformer.
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

#25 ducky ONLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2011 - 09:21 AM

Chuck
From my experience I would go with your straight up version for of easy cleaning and to prevent ash build up in the flatter runs of pipe.I would also suggest a piece or 2 of tri wall where you go though the wall or ceiling.

#26 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2011 - 09:29 AM

the pipe will be going up out the roof. I am going to try and put it where it can go straight up, but it may have to have a slight jog, so I can exit through the roof where I want it to exit.

#27 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2011 - 09:39 AM

In the back ground of the last photo I see a ceiling fan setting on a bucket. Use it! Put it in the highest spot in the ceiling and have it blowing down. Preferably in the center of the room. This will make a huge difference. I converted my double barrel wood stove to burn waste oil and have never looked back. Took me several years to come up with a simple burner that burned clean but now I can throttle the stove from warm to red hot and my non insulated shop is toasty warm even when below zero. If I was good with this darn computer I would make a diagram like yours of the burner and post it. Extremely easy to make. My stove pipe is old 8" auger tubing. It goes out the back wall where it tees into the vertical pipe. The bottom of the vertical pipe sets on the ground and runs up the back of the shop to above the peek. Been there for 30 years and has worked like charm.
Good luck with your project. What program do you use for your drawings? They look good.

#28 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2011 - 09:43 AM

What program do you use for your drawings? They look good.


google sketch up, free and easy to use.

#29 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2011 - 09:44 AM

In the back ground of the last photo I see a ceiling fan setting on a bucket. Use it! Put it in the highest spot in the ceiling and have it blowing down. Preferably in the center of the room. This will make a huge difference.


That's the plan.

#30 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2011 - 09:54 AM

Thanks Chuck. I'll check it out. Easy is very important for me :^)




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