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Wood Stove for the shop


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#1 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 09:27 AM

I am getting ready to install a wood stove in my shop.

I have some questions about how to run the pipe.

here is a idea I am toying with.
Posted Image

Any one have suggestions?

I want the stove as close as possible to the exterior wall. As to not eat up all the floor space. The shop is 24' wide, 8' walls, and I think it is 12' to the peak (maybe 11').

Edited by Chuck_050382, October 19, 2010 - 09:34 AM.


#2 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 10:16 AM

Chuck,
Why don't you just run the pipe straight up through the roof from the stove ? Or maybe you have a reason why you want it to exit at the peak.You would use less pipe if you went straight up,and you could still bring it up above the level of the peak.

#3 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 10:23 AM

Chuck,
Why don't you just run the pipe straight up through the roof from the stove ? Or maybe you have a reason why you want it to exit at the peak.You would use less pipe if you went straight up,and you could still bring it up above the level of the peak.



Not sure how I would support the pipe if it went straight up.

#4 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 10:51 AM

You could go out the wall, then build a steel support for the pipe. Ideally, if you could lay hands on a piece of well pipe, it would be super strong & easy to deal with. Would have to be tall to reach from the ground to height needed though. Through the wall is safest as it keeps so many joints out of the building.

#5 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 10:52 AM

If you are burning wood in the stove, that run is asking for creosote/ash build up along the pipe under the roof portion and will also be very difficult to run a clean out brush thru. I would be looking at going straight up or out the exterior wall and up. Are you thinking of using double wall insulated pipe or single wall black or galvanized pipe? Is the shop ceiling insulated/sheathed or? Plenty of questions but I'm sure you only want to do this once and be safe.
Peter

#6 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 11:00 AM

Peter is right...all that pipe will cause more cooling in the pipe, which will accelerate the creosote buildup. With that long a run of pipe, if there were a flue fire, it would be like a torch out the top.

#7 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 11:02 AM

If you are burning wood in the stove, that run is asking for creosote/ash build up along the pipe under the roof portion and will also be very difficult to run a clean out brush thru. I would be looking at going straight up or out the exterior wall and up. Are you thinking of using double wall insulated pipe or single wall black or galvanized pipe? Is the shop ceiling insulated/sheathed or? Plenty of questions but I'm sure you only want to do this once and be safe.
Peter


Yeah I'm going to burn wood. I was thinking about that run because I thought I had read that you wanted to exit the roof as close to the peak as possible.

Was jus going to use single wall black pipe. The shop has foam board insulation against the tin, but I was going remove the insulation near the pipe.

The shop is built from a carport ( 5 metal 3.5" X 1.5" ribs) with framed in ends.

#8 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 11:16 AM

Prevailing winds and draft, that will determine how tall you have to go with the pipe, it does not necessarily have to reach higher than the roof peak IF you can still get a draft at a lower point. Dan's thought of well casing is a good one I've seen more than one well casing flue/chimney, and sealing a wall against leakage is a LOT easier than cutting thru the roof and sealing that.
Peter

#9 DMF OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 11:37 AM

I'd go straight through. As other's have mentioned, going the path you illustrated will cause issues with cooling a creosote build-up. The shortest run of pipe to get the draft you need is best. There is a rule of thumb (code in Mass anyway) that states how high you need to go vs. the pitch of the roof. As Powerking mentioned, you don't need to go above the peak.

#10 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 11:40 AM

other ideas and suggested methods:
Posted Image
Posted Image

#11 DMF OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 11:52 AM

Either one of those is better than the first one that you posted. Again, you may find that you don't need to go higher than the peak either.

#12 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 12:16 PM

Prevailing winds and draft, that will determine how tall you have to go with the pipe, it does not necessarily have to reach higher than the roof peak IF you can still get a draft at a lower point. Dan's thought of well casing is a good one I've seen more than one well casing flue/chimney, and sealing a wall against leakage is a LOT easier than cutting thru the roof and sealing that.
Peter



Sorry but I have to disagree with this advice. There are building codes in place all over this continent that dictate the diameter of the chimney, the construction of the chimney and how tall the chimney must be in relation to the pitch of the roof. You should be talking with your local buildings department to make sure that you comply with the local code. I suggest that you also talk with the local fire department for additional advice regarding pipe clearances and stove clearances from combustible walls and ceilings. Wood stoves can emit a tremendous amount of heat not only from the stove portion but also from the chimney pipes.

Personally, I prefer radiant tube heat. It's safer and takes up zero floor real estate. In addition, the heat is nearly instantaneous when you flip it on. These heaters are available in propane, natural gas or oil fired models. You couldn't pay me to cut trees, split/stack/dry wood and then haul it indoors to burn it. What a royal PITA.

#13 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 12:37 PM

You couldn't pay me to cut trees, split/stack/dry wood and then haul it indoors to burn it. What a royal PITA.


I use wood for cooking, and clean up storm damaged trees for friends and family. So I have a lot of wood on hand and available, and I am going to be cutting and splitting anyway. I might as well use some to heat with. I will be putting in a used propane furnace eventually. But I am getting the wood stove for free and am looking forward to not using Kerosene heaters this winter.

#14 DMF OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 01:12 PM

You couldn't pay me to cut trees, split/stack/dry wood and then haul it indoors to burn it. What a royal PITA.

At $2.70 a gallon for oil I can be tempted to cut a lot of wood....

#15 justwalt OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2010 - 01:15 PM

Any angles or bends in the pipe make for tough cleaning.

And if the shop is insured, to avoid any problems, your insurance company
will want to know about it and will require it to be installed to code with set backs
from combustibles from the floor to the ceiling.

In my home, (with a wood floor), they wanted 18" of a non-combustible
material around the stove, and of course under it... then I went into an existing chimney.

AS for the roof, I'd want a piece of triple insulated pipe to never worry about it.

The insurance won't cover the building or contents for fire otherwise.

walt




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