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Digging A Ditch Before Mechanization


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#16 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 09:23 PM

Yes I have read some about that it is very interesting. I would never have though of MALARIA being one of the biggest obstacles in acomplishing that canal.

I also have a book my brother loaned me about building HOOVER DAM that i have been reading.

If you get a chance read about building the Erie Canal. It was the first great Civil Engineering project in the United States. They had monstorous wheels and axles setup to pull stumps and many ingenius other animal pulled machines.


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#17 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 09:28 PM

If you are interested in the tools read the books by Eric Sloane. 60 years ago he wrote a series of books about life and tools in America in the early 1800s.


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#18 Texas Deere and Horse OFFLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 09:32 PM

Thank you JD., very good read and neat to see how they did it back then.



#19 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 09:34 PM

If you are interested in the tools read the books by Eric Sloane. 60 years ago he wrote a series of books about life and tools in America in the early 1800s.

I have a couple of Slones books, he is an excellent writer/illustrator of the old ways.


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#20 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 09:50 PM

Those teamsters must have been harder than woodpecker lips.

 

They purchased and trained more oxen, most of them were wild Sandhill bulls, newly castrated, that often did not take kindly to their new status as work animals.

 

Couldnt imagine doing that to full grown wild bulls.



#21 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 10:05 PM

I have a couple of Slones books, he is an excellent writer/illustrator of the old ways.

 

I started reading his books 40 years ago. His personal museum still exists and hosts an antique machinery and tractor show in the fall. It is in Northwest Connecticut. If you want to read a youngster to sleep his "Noah Blake, Diary of an Early American Boy" is great.


Edited by boyscout862, March 26, 2013 - 10:09 PM.


#22 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted March 27, 2013 - 04:37 AM

Very interesting and the pictures were great to help explain the work.



#23 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 27, 2013 - 08:04 AM

Yeah I doubt They had Squeeze Chutes to hold them while they did it either?

Those teamsters must have been harder than woodpecker lips.

 

 

Couldnt imagine doing that to full grown wild bulls.



#24 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 27, 2013 - 10:23 AM

Yeah Being on the East Coast with it's long History it would be easy to not realize how young part of this country really is.

I Believe it was in 1844 That the Iowa Territory was open for Settlement.  Since there were no roads, a Farmer was Hired to plow a Furrow from Dubuque to Iowa City about 100 miles so the pioneers had a route to follow into the Territory.

That was interesting. And to think that was only just over 100 years ago! It is amazing how much everything has changed in a short period of time. We sure are spoiled in this day and age. Thanks for sharing :thumbs:



#25 daytime dave ONLINE  

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Posted March 27, 2013 - 11:21 AM

That was a very interesting read.  Those plows were enormous.  That is a lot of oxen to pull that huge plow.  I'm glad it had pictures to help put the perspective onto it.   






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