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1941 Briggs Model U Sears


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#1 bowtiebutler956 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2013 - 03:04 PM

 This is another engine I picked up recentley. Its a 41 Sears 500 Briggs Model U. The model U was manufactured by Briggs from 1940-45. It was designed by Briggs to stop the constant readjusting of the carburetor, depending on how much fuel you had in the tank, which was a very common problem with the old engines of this era. This particular engine was built for Sears by Briggs, and was used on the Sears David Bradley Handiman Walk Behind GT. This engine has a sealed fuel system, and if you take the gas cap off while its running, it will almost die. The basic block, head, crank, piston, rod, etc are the same as the model N. The parts that make these engines different are the carb, a rather unusual looking gas tank, and a wider base. This engine was in running condition when I got it, as you can see, but it was far from perfect. I will be replacing the block, and head, because of excesive rust pitting, and deterioration of the cooling fins. Here is a video, and some pics of it just after I got it. I put the air filter, and muffler on it, as it had the wrong air filter, and a very rusted muffler on it when I got it. This engine will be getting a full restoration. Thanks

 

Matt

 

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#2 bread320i OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2013 - 03:34 PM

I gota ask.

Why not just leave it as is. Its current state shows is age and durability.

 

Oh and where can I find a muffler like that. I want one.


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#3 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2013 - 03:37 PM

Wow, a 70+ year old engine that runs!


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#4 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2013 - 04:04 PM

That is pretty cool! The carb and gas tank looks like something you would see on a still with all of the copper pieces!


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#5 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2013 - 04:15 PM

That sure is a different looking animal with that carb and gas tank. It almost looks like it was sitting in the dirt upside down for a while with it being all pitted like that. I'm sure you'll have it all prettied up in no time.

 

Say....why are you flaunting your warmer weather with a pic of you in shorts and sandals? Its not fair you know, some of us are months away from that. :watching_you:


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#6 superaben OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2013 - 04:15 PM

I gota ask.

Why not just leave it as is. Its current state shows is age and durability.

 

Oh and where can I find a muffler like that. I want one.

 

Did you try Will Woodard?

 

Ben W.


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#7 bowtiebutler956 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2013 - 04:33 PM

I gota ask.

Why not just leave it as is. Its current state shows is age and durability.

 

Oh and where can I find a muffler like that. I want one.

 Thats easy, this engine has already been repainted, and the work that was done is marginal at best. If it was still all original, I wouldn't restore it. Since I'm going to restore it, I might as well make it as close to perfect as possible. I have many engines, that I have no intention of restoring because they are all original, and run well. Here is a video, and some pics of a 1940 model I that is all original, from the spark plug to the muffler. I haven't even cleaned the carb. It runs great. I won't restore this.

 

 

I got the muffler from a guy by the name of Mark Bruto. He reproduces these old briggs pancake mufflers. His ebay store is called burnzoil. It cost about $25.

 

Matt

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#8 bowtiebutler956 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 24, 2013 - 04:41 PM

Wow, a 70+ year old engine that runs!

 They built them to last back then!

 

That is pretty cool! The carb and gas tank looks like something you would see on a still with all of the copper pieces!

 Your right, it does Ryan. LOL

 

That sure is a different looking animal with that carb and gas tank. It almost looks like it was sitting in the dirt upside down for a while with it being all pitted like that. I'm sure you'll have it all prettied up in no time.

 

Say....why are you flaunting your warmer weather with a pic of you in shorts and sandals? Its not fair you know, some of us are months away from that. :watching_you:

 Its not warm here Nate. Its HOT!! It was 102 yesterday!  So although our winters are very mild, our summers are vicious. So, as it gets hotter Nate, you'll be lucky if I'm even wearing shorts in my next videos! :bigrofl:

 

Matt


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#9 bowtiebutler956 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 03:33 PM

 I finished getting the U tore down, and it was full of surprizes! This little engine has had alot of hours on it, in its life. It had a .010 over piston in it, and it already had a fair amount of scratching in the cylinder, along with some rust pitting where it had had water in it at some point in time. When I got to the bottom end, the rod felt nice, and tight on the crank, but when I removed the rod cap, I found the crank journal, and rod to be in ruff shape. I put a mic on the crank, and found it to be almost .012 under tolerance. :ah_shoot: Wondering how the rod fit so tight, I started inspecting the rod cap, and realized the rod, and cap had been ground down to tighten it up on the crank. I'm not knocking the previous owner, as my dad use to do this to fix small engines cheaply when I was a kid, and I've spent a large part of my life trying to fix things with no money, so I understand. Every gasket in this engine was handmade, including the head gasket. While all these things are ok, they simply won't do, for an engine that I'm restoring. Luckily, the block, crank, rod, piston, etc., all carry the same part numbers as a model N, which I have plenty of spare parts for. So, here are a few pics of the replacement block sitting next to the oe block for comparison sake. Along with a few other parts like, piston, rope cup, etc., that are getting replace with better ones. Thanks

 

Matt

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#10 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 04:36 PM

Believe it or not filling rod and main bearing caps was once a standard procedure. I saw it in print in an old Motors manual once.
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#11 bowtiebutler956 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 07:35 PM

Believe it or not filling rod and main bearing caps was once a standard procedure. I saw it in print in an old Motors manual once.

 I have heard that. My dad said when he was a kid, adding shims, and filing rod caps was standard procedure. My grandfather was an expert at pouring new babbit bearings for the really old engines. Those were definitely different times.

 

Matt



#12 Amigatec OFFLINE  

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Posted March 26, 2013 - 07:41 PM

The Motor Manual I saw it in covered cars built between 1935 and 1949. It was in the section on Chrysler Engines. It was not in the 1950 and up manual. But back then a lot of motors used Babbitts and shims.
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#13 bowtiebutler956 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2013 - 07:54 PM

 Thought I'd update this thread. Finally got around to assembling the long block on this engine. I found an absolutely perfect crankshaft for it in one of my parts engines. I also found a NOS gasket set, along with a NOS Champion J8 plug, and a correct plug wire. This engine should run great when its done, as it will be nice and tight. Anyway, here are a few pics, along with one of the original parts sitting next to the replacement pieces. Thanks

 

Matt

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#14 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2013 - 08:57 PM

Looking good Matt  :thumbs:


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#15 Ryan313 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 02, 2013 - 04:15 PM

Looks great! I think you should post a picture of your entire Briggs collection.


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