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#1 ErnRemy OFFLINE  

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Posted October 03, 2010 - 11:17 AM

Has anyone had any experience with using windsheild washer fluid as extra weight in the tires. I was talking with local tire shop about fluid for my tires this winter when running the snow blower he informed me that the pop the top beed and pour in up to 10 gallons of fluid the reinflate. sounds better than calcium cloride rusting out the rimms

#2 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted October 03, 2010 - 11:46 AM

You can't use calcium chloride without tubes. Yes, windshield washer fluid can be used, but there are different types for seasons. Be SURE to use a winter formula which will have plenty freeze protection. I use 20% ethanol (alcohol) to 80% water in my tubeless tires.

#3 DGS345 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 03, 2010 - 04:34 PM

When I loaded mine I used RV antifreeze with a half gal of regular antifreeze(for corrosion) and I used a pump hooked on my drill along with a hose i made pics attached.

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#4 justwalt OFFLINE  

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Posted October 03, 2010 - 11:53 PM

different fluids have different weights...
calcium chloride weighs about 11.9 lbs/gal, and eats metals... bad
molasses or sugar beet by-products weighs 11.7 lbs/gal, but is messy and tastes bad
washer fluid is about 8.4 lbs/gal, and keeps the bugs off...?

citrus based fluid falls in between, (I thought about 10 lbs/gal),
but it tastes good, and though sticky, it washes off easily,
and is totally environmentally friendly.

always think about a leaking or flat tire when choosing a tire ballast
and the tires really need to be professionally filled due to the possibility
of loosing the bead seal while filling, and other problems. any shop
that fills tires has the charts for the exact amount of fluid for your tire size.

tires are filled to the valve stem, at the 12:00 position... the rest is air.


walt

Edited by justwalt, October 04, 2010 - 12:08 AM.


#5 DGS345 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2010 - 06:04 AM

Calcium chloride is nasty stuff when I was working in the tire shop I can,t tell you how many pair of boots and jeans it cost me. If you are using a safe alternative there is no reason to have your tires done by a pro, who is going to overcharge you. The rv anti freeze is 100% safe for humans, animals and the environment. And when I went to my local Advanced Auto and told them how much i needed, they gave me a good price on it. As I said earlier I wouldn't break the bead to fill my tires but you can build a simple tool to do it. Just take out the core and a fuel line hooked to the valve stem works fine. Just stop every few minutes to let the air out. In my 10 years in a tire shop loading all kinds of tires we never once used a chart just filled them to the valve stem. Simple, easy and safe as long as you use common sense.

#6 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2010 - 06:28 AM

Calcium chloride is nasty stuff when I was working in the tire shop I can,t tell you how many pair of boots and jeans it cost me. If you are using a safe alternative there is no reason to have your tires done by a pro, who is going to overcharge you. The rv anti freeze is 100% safe for humans, animals and the environment. And when I went to my local Advanced Auto and told them how much i needed, they gave me a good price on it. As I said earlier I wouldn't break the bead to fill my tires but you can build a simple tool to do it. Just take out the core and a fuel line hooked to the valve stem works fine. Just stop every few minutes to let the air out. In my 10 years in a tire shop loading all kinds of tires we never once used a chart just filled them to the valve stem. Simple, easy and safe as long as you use common sense.



:iagree:

#7 poncho62 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2010 - 06:46 AM

I use RV antifreeze.....its on sale this time of year, so its just about as cheap as windshield washer fluid

#8 Chuck_050382 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2010 - 07:58 AM

I have washer fluid in my ford's tires. Will be doing it to the craftsman soon. and once the the 990 gets done it will be filled also.

#9 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2010 - 08:04 AM

I used Rim Guard on a pair of Nanco 21x10.50x12s and got 80 lbs total per tire and rim included Didn't weight before but a guess would be 25-30 for tire and wheel.
The 26x12x12s weighted 180 lbs. each when done. About 35 lbs. per empty. It,s basically beet juice and weighs 10 lbs/gallon. At $4.00 a gallon it run $160.00 with labor. They were filled laying on a 2x4 with the valve at the highest point to get maximum fill and 5 psi.
Think a Carlisle 26x12x12s would probably come in at 200 lbs. Has anybody filled a pair of those?
It really make a different in the way the tractors rides on bumpy ground. Real takes the jars out.

#10 DGS345 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2010 - 09:19 AM

My tires with the weights (23x8.50x12) weigh in at around 142 pounds each with the wheel weights.(dont tell the wife I used her bathroom scale) and yea it rides like a caddy now:smile1:
It cost me around maybe 30.00 dollars to fill my tires. best thing I ever did cant wait to try them out in the snow

Edited by DGS345, October 08, 2010 - 10:02 AM.


#11 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2010 - 10:02 AM

My tires with the weights (23x8.50x12) weigh in at around 112 pounds each with the wheel weights.(dont tell the wife I used her bathroom scale) and yea it rides like a caddy now:smile1:
It cost me around maybe 30.00 dollars to fill my tires. best thing I ever did cant wait to try them out in the snow


That's what I used to weigh mine.
Wasn't sure it would survive rolling those 26x12x12s up on her.

#12 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2010 - 09:28 AM

I used Rim Guard on a pair of Nanco 21x10.50x12s and got 80 lbs total per tire and rim included Didn't weight before but a guess would be 25-30 for tire and wheel.
The 26x12x12s weighted 180 lbs. each when done. About 35 lbs. per empty. It,s basically beet juice and weighs 10 lbs/gallon. At $4.00 a gallon it run $160.00 with labor. They were filled laying on a 2x4 with the valve at the highest point to get maximum fill and 5 psi.
Think a Carlisle 26x12x12s would probably come in at 200 lbs. Has anybody filled a pair of those?
It really make a different in the way the tractors rides on bumpy ground. Real takes the jars out.


Just to update.
Last night I loaded our other 26x12x12s with anti freeze (40/60).
Tires weighed in at 140 lbs. About 40 lbs lighter than Rim Guard.

#13 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2010 - 12:53 PM

Just to update.
Last night I loaded our other 26x12x12s with anti freeze (40/60).
Tires weighed in at 140 lbs. About 40 lbs lighter than Rim Guard.


Is anti freeze really that much lighter then the rim guard?




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