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Glassbeading Or Sandblasting Fiberglass


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#1 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 07:59 PM

Just curious to see if anybody has ever tried glassbeading or sandblasting fiberglass? I have some fiberglass fenders that are cracked, and there is a lot of dirt in the cracks or between the splits. I was going to try and clean most of dirt out and see if I can epoxy most of the cracks back together, but wasn't sure what the best way of cleaning the dirt might be. I would think that sandblasting would be a little too harsh on the fiberglass, but what about glassbeading them? Since most glassbeading cabinets don't have the higher pressure, I thought it might be a little bit more wiser to use it. I guess sandblasting could work if I turned the pressure down on the tank too, but I'm still just a little scared of using this route.

 

I guess I could just cut out most of the cracks, and just build everything back up with new fiberglass, but I was hoping for an easier fix. Any suggestions?


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#2 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 08:09 PM

How about putting baking soda on/in the cracks (maybe with and old tooth brush) and dripping white vinegar on them (turkey baster) and letting the dirt bubble out? Shouldn't hurt anything. Works great on lots of porous materials and will even remove mildew.

I've never tried this on cracked fenders, but I have used it to clean bathroom tubs and sink gouges that needed repaired.

Just a thought.


Edited by jpackard56, March 14, 2013 - 08:13 PM.

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#3 Toolpartzman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 08:12 PM

Is there a way you can clean the cracks out without blasting? It seems to me that any blasting will create rough areas in the "good" surface thats going to need sanding etc. before finishing. High pressure car wash or something more gentle?


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#4 bgkid2966 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 08:13 PM

Soda blasting is great for soft materials. I don't know if it works with the same equipment as sand blasting. Just a thought.

 

 

 

 

Geno


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#5 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 08:14 PM

How about putting baking soda on/in the cracks (maybe with and old tooth brush) and dripping white vinegar on them (turkey baster) and letting the dirt bubble out? Shouldn't hurt anything. Works great on lots of porous materials and will even remove mildew. Just my 2cents.

 

Ah, didn't even give that a thought. Good thinking, and I will have to give that a try. Thank you!


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#6 Humey222 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 08:19 PM

He had a good idea about the baking soda and vinegar, I've heard that before. I thought about a soda blaster. I've used it on some of parts for my Gibson and i'm very impressed with for outcome on the rims, gas tank straps and a few others. Maybe turn the pressure down on it; say around 70 or 80psi? Just a thought.

      Parry


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#7 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 08:29 PM

I saw the results of sand blasting a '62 Vette. The guy should have been flogged. I wouldn't use any blasting on fiberglas. There are usually  soft spots that will eat away fast. Good Luck, Rick


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#8 ckjakline OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 08:45 PM

Troy,

Sandblastig or glass beading fiberglass will probably ruin the fenders,and if it doesn't it'll probably do more harm than good.I would use the baking soda and vinegar methob mentioned above.Baking soda and water will clean corroded battery terminals.Maybe spray the crack with simple green or another degreaser and blow the crack out with an air nozzle.Maybe that'll break down the grease.



#9 philips100 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 09:37 PM

Do you have pictures? Is it stress cracks or is it crazing?

 

Being a boat repair guy, to properly repair cracks in epoxy, you should grind back the epoxy and feather out from the crack. Then you have a larger surface for the newly applied epoxy to attach.

 

If you have too many cracks to use this method, you can open up the cracks by dragging the pointed end of a can opener over them. Take a look at Interlux products. They have a product that will coat and fill in the open cracks and crazing. You can then primer and paint or re- epoxy you fiberglass pieces. This process will usually last about ten years.


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#10 Nato77 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2013 - 10:07 PM

If the crack and dirt is down into the fibers, I would grind the crack out into the fibers till the dirt is gone. Then use a 2 part epoxy to fill it. This is the way I've done truck hoods for years.

 

Are they fiberglass or SMC?  The difference is you can see the fibers on the back side of a fiberglass panel, SMC will be smooth on the back. Fiberglass resins don't work very well on SMC being its compressed together (resin won't soak in). Thats the reason I use epoxy to do repairs. 


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#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2013 - 10:29 AM

Having done a fair bit of sandblasting on metal in a previous career, It would be far too agressive to use on Fiberglass.You could blow a hole through that in a heartbeat!  My brother was in Auto Bodywork for 33 yrs and with glass he always ground it out and laid up fabric to repair it. 


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#12 backwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2013 - 10:36 AM

norton has a plastic an fiberglass repair kit drill an 1/8th" hole at the end of the crack use a dremel or similar tool v grove the crack then use glass cleaner to clean the area. do not use any thinners or solvent based cleaners on it the fiberglass will absorb the solvent an give ya ahellof time fixing the repair. i would use fiberglass mat or long hair filler to help with structal integritiy of the piece. pictures of the problem parts would also help for better advice on fixing this.


Edited by backwoods, March 15, 2013 - 10:37 AM.

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#13 JRJ OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2013 - 11:26 AM

There is some very good info. about repairing the damage you are referring to, and I think many of us have learned something we did not know about working with fiberglass.

 

 

Dick



#14 backwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2013 - 11:42 AM

if anyone has questions about fiberglass or plastic repair let me know im taking autobody in college if i dont already know the answer ill look in the book or ask my teacher and get the info from him.



#15 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2013 - 04:39 PM

How about putting baking soda on/in the cracks (maybe with and old tooth brush) and dripping white vinegar on them (turkey baster) and letting the dirt bubble out? Shouldn't hurt anything. Works great on lots of porous materials and will even remove mildew.

I've never tried this on cracked fenders, but I have used it to clean bathroom tubs and sink gouges that needed repaired.

Just a thought.

That sounds like a very safe and easy method.

 

Soda blasting is great for soft materials. I don't know if it works with the same equipment as sand blasting. Just a thought.

 

 

 

 

Geno

We have a lot of ARMEX baking sode blasters at work, and they do a really good job....less agressive than sand or steel shot. We also have plastic bead blasters....little granuals of plastic for media.






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